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Old 12-10-2011, 05:31 AM   #1
divyashree
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Permission bit


Can anyone tell me what is this L bit in groups last bit ??
I got this line in one of my directory..


Code:
-rwxrwLr-x    1 tmmlprod user      956900 Dec 10 15:32 409001000114.pdf

Last edited by divyashree; 12-10-2011 at 06:05 AM.
 
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:08 AM   #2
colucix
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Some implementations of the ls command use L to denote the set-group-id bit, whereas you usually see a S. The uppercase L means that the execution bit is not set, otherwise you would see a lowercase l. The same applies when ls shows it as S or s.

An example of an executable with the setgid bit set is the command wall. In this case the l should be lowercase, since the execution bit is set. Check it on your system to verify:
Code:
ls -l `which wall`
At this point I'm curious... which system are you running on and what implementation of the ls command is this?

Lastly, you can find some information about the L permission bit here.

Last edited by colucix; 12-10-2011 at 06:13 AM.
 
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:25 AM   #3
divyashree
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colucix View Post
Some implementations of the ls command use L to denote the set-group-id bit, whereas you usually see a S. The uppercase L means that the execution bit is not set, otherwise you would see a lowercase l. The same applies when ls shows it as S or s.

An example of an executable with the setgid bit set is the command wall. In this case the l should be lowercase, since the execution bit is set. Check it on your system to verify:
Code:
ls -l `which wall`
At this point I'm curious... which system are you running on and what implementation of the ls command is this?

Lastly, you can find some information about the L permission bit here.
I got this :

Code:
-rwxr-xr-x    1 root     sys        19332 Sep  2 18:54 /sbin/wall


Thanks for the info. But if executable bit is not set, then it should remain blank.
 
Old 12-10-2011, 07:50 AM   #4
colucix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by divyashree View Post
I got this: -rwxr-xr-x 1 root sys 19332 Sep 2 18:54 /sbin/wall
Ok, there are differences from system to system on how permissions are set. On which system do you see the L behaviour anyway?
Quote:
Thanks for the info. But if executable bit is not set, then it should remain blank.
Good point! Indeed the setgid bit has a different meaning if applied to executables, not-executables or directories:

1. on executables: the user who executes the program gains privileges of the group to which the file is assigned.
2. on not-executables: processes are granted to use the mandatory locking on these files. See this document for details: http://kernel.org/doc/Documentation/...ry-locking.txt
3. on directories: this causes new files created inside the directory to inherit its group ID.

Last edited by colucix; 12-10-2011 at 07:59 AM.
 
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Old 12-19-2011, 10:56 PM   #5
divyashree
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colucix View Post
Ok, there are differences from system to system on how permissions are set. On which system do you see the L behaviour anyway?

Good point! Indeed the setgid bit has a different meaning if applied to executables, not-executables or directories:

1. on executables: the user who executes the program gains privileges of the group to which the file is assigned.
2. on not-executables: processes are granted to use the mandatory locking on these files. See this document for details: http://kernel.org/doc/Documentation/...ry-locking.txt
3. on directories: this causes new files created inside the directory to inherit its group ID.
Thanks colucix for the nice info.

Actually I got it on an very old Unix System ( IRIX 6.5 ).
 
  


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