LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-17-2012, 06:12 AM   #1
stoop65
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2012
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Partitioning


Hi there, I was wondering how important the partitioning [I]order[I] is(i.e. /, swap, /home as opposed to /, /home, swap, or any other possible combination of multiple partitions). Does it have any effect on performance?
Thanks in advance,
Stephen
 
Old 12-17-2012, 06:31 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,417

Rep: Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974Reputation: 1974
realistically it's not important. moreover, most of this would likely be in LVM, in which case the physical location on disk would be managed automatically within the LVM partitions. Theoretically It's quicker to read data on the outside of a platter, but it's not going to make much difference.

Last edited by acid_kewpie; 12-17-2012 at 06:33 AM.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-17-2012, 06:34 AM   #3
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 8,576
Blog Entries: 31

Rep: Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195
Yes. The read/write heads move relatively slowly across the platters so it helps to have the most frequently accessed data in the middle of the platter and the least frequently in the centre and the outside. That way the head's movement is minimised; they spend most of their time around the middle.

It depends on the individual system and its usage which file system(s) have the most frequent access. On a personal workstation it might well be /home while on a server it might well be /var or /srv. If it's the swap partition it shouldn't be! Measurements during typical use would be invaluable.

It's debateable whether the work involved justifies the marginal perfomance increase. If you enjoy doing this sort of thing for the fun of it then the work cost is negative and it's well worth doing!

EDIT: reading acid_kewpie's post after posting, I realise there are two performance considerations -- the seek time and the data transfer rate. Zone bit recording means more data is accessible per revolution of the drive toward the outside, improving both seek and transfer performance.

Last edited by catkin; 12-17-2012 at 06:57 AM.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-17-2012, 09:14 AM   #4
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
The most important factor is that the data you access is nearest the previous data. That typically means you should put the most frequently accessed data near the half way point.

A secondary factor is that relative seek times are lower and transfer rates higher at the outer edge of the physical platter (the beginning from a partitioning point of view).

In typical Linux systems, neither of those considerations translates easily into a clear decision about partition sequence.

Long ago, swap was accessed more than other areas. So it was good to give swap a preferred position. But now, swap is typically accessed less.

If you have a lot of ram, /lib and /usr/lib and other installed software tend to get accessed a lot as the system starts up. Then it might get very little access later because most of it remains in the file cache. So how much do you care about boot up speed. The beginning area is probably best for those things if you want to optimize boot up speed (we assume those things are roughly together wherever they are, so at the beginning they are together and faster).

But if you do a lot of work that modifies data files, those files must be written regardless of caching, so the long term performance should matter more than boot up, so the data files you modify a lot should have the preferred spot (but we still haven't figured out whether "preferred" is the beginning or half way or somewhere between those two points).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-17-2012, 10:24 AM   #5
theNbomr
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Distribution: OpenSuse, Fedora, Redhat, Debian
Posts: 5,396
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 908Reputation: 908Reputation: 908Reputation: 908Reputation: 908Reputation: 908Reputation: 908Reputation: 908
Not sure if it still matters, but there may be a problem for bootloaders to access the far nether reaches of today's huge disks. Bootloaders are primitive, and use primitive methods to read disks, so accessing a filesystem (the /boot directory, for grub) that cannot be accessed without special help might be a concern. Sorry to get all maybe-ish; playing with bootloaders isn't something I do all the time, and the rules seems to change faster than I can keep up with.

I'm not even sure you can assume that any kind of physical to logical mapping applies any more. It seems even disks have gotten smart, and it may be futile to try to outsmart one. Oh, my. That's a weird thought. I suppose the day isn't too far away when my toaster will be able to beat me at chess.

--- rod.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-17-2012, 03:46 PM   #6
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 15,388

Rep: Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199Reputation: 2199
In a real sort of test, I guess you could get some to show gain or loss from a choice. Not too many people try to modify the data anymore. At one time it was a consideration. There is really much more to the issue now and not sure one can figure out a best way. Testing under exact use would prove some gain. It may only be minutes per year or maybe minuted per day.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HD partitioning x88a Linux - Newbie 10 05-27-2008 12:26 AM
partitioning sentme_mail Linux - Newbie 4 02-18-2007 11:25 PM
hd partitioning aw76 Linux - Hardware 2 12-20-2005 11:58 PM
partitioning Thunderchild Mandriva 6 04-02-2005 06:51 AM
Partitioning egh128 Linux - General 13 04-23-2002 06:07 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:33 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration