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Old 05-28-2016, 10:02 PM   #1
Fred Caro
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partition/table problem


I started with:

/dev/sda1 xp
/dev/sda5 extented
/dev/sda6 debian
/dev/sda7 swap

I think! But the xp was on a primary partition, the rest on extended logical ones.

I removed /dev/sda1 and installed various "linux" on /dev/sda1, sooner or later they complained- usually to the effect that the new system had remounted as read only and any additional software (especially large installs) would trigger this remount.

I did not want to create a new partition table as this would destroy any reference to the debian installation. I assumed that the sda1 partition is recorded as xp, so I put a small partition on as sda1 and formated it to ext4 (perhaps a mistake) and used the rest of the space as usual.

All was fine until I did another large update-

(distro is Ubuntu-mate and updated libreoffice via the bootique (daft name, even when spelt right))

It remounted read only and would not shutdown, much as before.

Forced a shutdown and rebooted to the rescue menu, ran fsck and fix broken packages options.

All seemed well when I resumed the boot until I ran synaptic and looked for the sources, it complained again and had to force a shutdown.

When I rebooted, fdisk -l listed 15 /dev/ram occurrences

I removed these and synaptic listed the sources

Not entirely sure what is going on!

Fred.
 
Old 05-28-2016, 10:06 PM   #2
frankbell
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It would help to see the exact error messages as well as the output of fdisk -l to which you referred. The more precise the detail you provide, the easier it will be for others to help you.

I realize that you may not have them at hand at this point, but, if you replicate the problem, it would be a good idea to make a note of them. Perhaps you could record them with a digital camera.
 
Old 05-28-2016, 10:16 PM   #3
jpollard
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The only time you have a problem with 'readonly' during boots is deliberate:

1. the system boots with root mounted read only to allow the system to potentially repair damage.
2. if the filesystem requires repair, you DON'T mount the disk as the buffers in memory no longer necessarily match the disk filesystem structure. You force a reboot after the repair succeeds (and it may take multiple tries first) without dismounting.
3. if the disk doesn't need repair, then it is remounted read/write and continues.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 07:16 AM   #4
Fred Caro
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It does n't boot read only it experiences a problem and remounts the file system (all under /) as read only then appears to hang. The problem occurred when updating libreoffice. The 'repair broken packages' routine in the boot options seems to have worked and libreoffice appears to be working also the source ppa for libreoffice is installed.

sudo fdisk -l still shows this, however:

Quote:
fred@fred-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
[sudo] password for fred:
Disk /dev/ram0: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram1: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram2: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram3: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram4: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram5: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram6: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram7: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram8: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram9: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram10: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram11: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram12: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram13: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram14: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/ram15: 64 MiB, 67108864 bytes, 131072 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes


Disk /dev/sda: 186.3 GiB, 200049647616 bytes, 390721968 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xa12ba12b

Device Boot Start End Sectors Size Id Type
/dev/sda1 2048 1026047 1024000 500M 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 103153662 390721535 287567874 137.1G 5 Extended
/dev/sda3 * 1026048 103151047 102125000 48.7G 83 Linux
/dev/sda5 103153664 382339071 279185408 133.1G 83 Linux
/dev/sda6 382341120 390721535 8380416 4G 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order.


fred@fred-desktop:~$
fred@fred-desktop:~$ ls -l /dev/ram*
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 0 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram0
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 1 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram1
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 10 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram10
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 11 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram11
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 12 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram12
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 13 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram13
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 14 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram14
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 15 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram15
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 2 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram2
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 3 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram3
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 4 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram4
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 5 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram5
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 6 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram6
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 7 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram7
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 8 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram8
brw-rw---- 1 root disk 1, 9 May 29 10:42 /dev/ram9
It is not usual to see listings for /dev/ram under fdisk. Also there are a lot listings (29) when I run mount, including 10 for cgroup, eg,

Quote:
pstore on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/freezer type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,freezer,nsroot=/)
cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu,cpuacct type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,cpu,cpuacct,nsroot=/)
cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/devices type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,devices,nsroot=/)
Fred.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 08:00 AM   #5
jpollard
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/dev is a memory resident filesystem used by udev updating it from device scans/information. It isn't disk based.

The same applies to /sys - it is supported by the kernel to allow system control via standard file operations. Again, not a disk.

fdisk only reports disk devices. /dev/ram* is a simulated disk (in memory), and not a real disk. If you are getting errors from ramdisks, you may be having memory problems.

You might consider running memtest for a couple of hours to see if there are any (it can take all day for lots of memory and the full set of tests).

Last edited by jpollard; 05-29-2016 at 08:01 AM.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 09:40 AM   #6
Emerson
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First, your sda1 was not tagged as XP, there really is no such thing.
Second, partitions can fill up and cause crashes as the one you got during large applications installation when lots of temporary files are created and root partition is almost full. Also, it is possible you ran out of inodes, df -i will tell.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 09:02 PM   #7
Fred Caro
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I will run a memtest but I don't have the same problems on other systems using the same hardware.

For the record, results of df -i:

Quote:
fred@fred-desktop:~$ df -i
Filesystem Inodes IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on
udev 492756 526 492230 1% /dev
tmpfs 505829 724 505105 1% /run
/dev/sda3 3194880 236649 2958231 8% /
tmpfs 505829 8 505821 1% /dev/shm
tmpfs 505829 5 505824 1% /run/lock
tmpfs 505829 16 505813 1% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs 505829 9 505820 1% /run/user/108
tmpfs 505829 18 505811 1% /run/user/1000
Fred.
 
Old 05-30-2016, 08:06 PM   #8
Fred Caro
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I ran a memtest for 2 hours and it did not report any errors and no other disk reports /dev/ram with fdisk -l.

There were i/o errors when I tried shutdown after the initial failed libreoffice update.

It seems to run ok and boot the debian install ok but why do I still get /dev/ram entries from fdisk on Ubuntu-mate?

Fred.
 
  


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