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Old 05-28-2016, 12:11 PM   #1
shaen
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Post Paper on linux and its community: might be of interest to newbies


Hey there,

I'm a university student that just transitioned from Mac OS to Linux a few months ago. I had to write a conference paper analysing communities on web 2.0 and found this to be a great opportunity to get more information out there about Linux - after having thoroughly researched the topic of course.

Here is the link for those interested, intrigued and generally just scratching their heads over what Linux is all about: http://wp.me/s7lerl-540

Feel free to leave comments and questions!

Cheers,
Shaen.
 
Old 05-28-2016, 12:30 PM   #2
beachboy2
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shaen,

Welcome to LQ and thank you for writing the conference paper.

Please forward all Linux queries to these forums so that we can help to enlighten others.
 
Old 05-28-2016, 01:31 PM   #3
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaen View Post
Feel free to leave comments and questions!
Hi Shaen, welcome to the forum

I would be delighted to leave some comments! To be honest, you leave no doubts as to your own perspective...

Quote:
We Don’t Need No Thought Control
But I have a couple thoughts as to what you said here...

Quote:
Many big corporations sell their OS to the public at a hefty price and with strict copyright restrictions (Krzyzanowski, 2015), as in the famous case of Microsoft and Apple. These restrictions mean that users cannot tamper with the software to make it their own and/or share it. One must purchase the OS, that typically comes with the purchase of their computers, and use it as it was manufactured and envisioned by the company (“Software License Agreement”, 2016). Although this force-feed approach is often considered as the only choice for acquiring an OS, it is simply the most common option (“Operating system market share”, 2016). People are unaware of other alternatives due to a significant lack of advertising and marketing (Byfield, 2009) but Linux’s popularity is starting to grow in light of (resurfacing) frustrations surrounding big companies’ “centralized control” (Löhner, 2016).
When did it become unreasonable or even wrong for someone (or a company) to make money from a product they created (to sell at a profit) and for it to include reasonable and necessary safeguards to protect against theft?

I could be wrong but what you wrote kind of has the undertone of "restrictive EULA (i.e., not Open Source) and profit = bad." Yes, I am a capitalist (with checks and balances.)

One of the key words here is "reasonable." I do not agree with nor am I seeking to justify what I would consider abuse, overreach or overly restrictive policies of any particular company, including the comment by Cowboy Coder mentioned later in your paper. However, at the same time, I believe that individuals and companies should have the right to create a EULA that protects their interests as long as it doesn't infringe upon or take away the privacy or certain rights of the user. Those "rights" will no doubt have to be hashed out in legislative bodies and courts around the world.

I would also argue that what would seem as "force feeding" to many Linux users is a blessing and help to others who neither have the desire or ability to learn about computing to the level a repair technician or programmer (or even the issues revolving around free vs. proprietary software.) They have no interest or ability beyond turning the system on and bringing up and using their favorite programs from the Start Menu. Others may disagree but using Linux does require more technical "know how" with certain things than Windows does, including (and perhaps especially) driver support and installation.

I see benefits and weaknesses to both Open Source and proprietary software and licenses and am glad they both exist and folks have the freedom to license their software as they see fit.

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 05-28-2016 at 01:48 PM. Reason: Added comments/Changed wording.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 01:18 PM   #4
offgridguy
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+1.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 10:05 PM   #5
Fred Caro
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There is a difference between 'open source' and 'free' or 'Libre' software.

Quote:
When did it become unreasonable or even wrong for someone (or a company) to make money from a product they created (to sell at a profit) and for it to include reasonable and necessary safeguards to protect against theft?
That is fine if they created it themselves, from scratch but they don't. It builds on what has gone before and if that software becomes available either by accident, and or benevolence, companies (or individuals) modify it and call it their own, wrongly. That is why developers sued VMWare.

Fred.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 10:26 PM   #6
Doug G
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Quote:
That is fine if they created it themselves, from scratch but they don't. It builds on what has gone before...
No company or organization has created digital computer software "from scratch" since the first program on ENIAC in the 1940's. Since then, every piece of software has been built with concepts and code from earlier software. The question is where is the dividing line between originality and copying. linux itself has been entangled in copyright lawsuits for decades, and if it weren't for the support from some for-profit companies, many of which sell their own software, we probably wouldn't be allowed to use linux today.

$0.0000000000002
 
Old 05-30-2016, 01:01 AM   #7
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Caro View Post
That is fine if they created it themselves, from scratch but they don't. It builds on what has gone before and if that software becomes available either by accident, and or benevolence, companies (or individuals) modify it and call it their own, wrongly. That is why developers sued VMWare.
Good point, thanks!

Regards...
 
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Old 05-31-2016, 09:51 AM   #8
sundialsvcs
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I prefer to use the term: "Collaborative Software Development.

The fact that it is "open source" is really just "a necessary attribute."

The common term, "FOSS = Free Open-Source Software" is definitely a misnomer. "Nothing's free. Especially not computer software!"

"The Linux eco-system" is the product, now, of literally thousands of people (and corporations, including very-major corporations), cooperatively developing software under the auspices of legally-enforceable copyright licenses which mandate sharing. In exchange for their contribution of work to the collective effort ... usually, at their own expense ... they are legally entitled to use the collective work-product that comes from everyone's collective effort. (As is anyone and everyone else, who contributed nothing so-far.)

The result of this concept is obvious ... and economically compelling. "A rising tide lifts all boats." Everyone is able to benefit from something that no one "one" would be able to afford(!) to create on their own.

(Some people say that the market-value of the Linux eco-system is worth "billions," while others say, "trillions." Anyway, a very big number.)

Companies are also able to (legally ...) start with this collaboratively-developed foundation and to build their own proprietary wares on top of it, so long as their proprietary offerings do not co-mingle with the collaborative portion so as to actually be "part of it." (That is actually illegal. The legal enforceability of copyright agreements such as (but not limited to) GPL has been tested and upheld in courts around the world.

I candidly suggest that your conference-paper shows rather extreme bias, and I would invite you to consider that it should be rather-substantially rewritten, if you have not yet presented it.
 
Old 06-09-2016, 08:27 PM   #9
Fred Caro
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sundialsvcs,

this might depend on which version of the GPL you are considering. 'copy left' stipulates that if you have used code A to produce code B, you must publish your changed source code.

Quote:
co-mingle
This is only relevant to non 'copy left' at best and possibly only a legal construct that you would need a lot of resources to challenge.

Fred.
 
Old 06-10-2016, 02:32 AM   #10
hazel
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I think it is misleading to identify an operating system with a desktop, as you do in your introduction. That might make sense in the case of Windows, where the two are closely integrated, but an OS like Linux can run with many different desktops or with none at all. It would be better to say that an operating system is the basic software that enables a computer to use its hardware and to run other programs.
 
  


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