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Old 10-14-2016, 02:45 AM   #1
SwiftlyGifted
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Not sure how to install programs on Linux Mint


My main problem is that I didn't know as much as I thought I did. I'm new to Linux. Windows 10 was my former OS. But I'm told that Linux is more secure when it comes to many things. So here I am. However when trying to install Google Chrome it asks me which version to install and all I know is that I use Linux Mint. I have Firefox installed so I'm not sure if I even need Google Chrome. I'm just really lost and it's not a good feeling. I want to install some software on this laptop but I don't know where to begin.
 
Old 10-14-2016, 03:07 AM   #2
syg00
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Go to linuxmint.com - under "Downloads" there is a tab for Documentation; get the user guide pdf for your language. Has a chapter on Software Management plus plenty more.
Used to be there was a welcome window that should have something as well.
 
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Old 10-14-2016, 05:20 AM   #3
Jjanel
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Hi & WELCOME! It's great that you are giving Linux a shot. ('dual-boot'? PC?)
Yes, the basic Unix architecture is no where near as vulnerable as Windows is.

Here, the 'magic' keyword is 'package'! Now you can search for tutorials on installing packages.
There's even a lot of whole books on the web. Mint is based on Ubuntu and Debian, so dpkg (NOT rpm!)

Looking forward to hearing about your journey! (when you post a question, remember to include essential details and attempts)

Best wishes... Happy *searching* (with 'just the right' keywords)! e.g.

Last edited by Jjanel; 10-18-2016 at 09:58 PM. Reason: add e.g. link
 
Old 10-14-2016, 05:28 AM   #4
hazel
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The main thing you need to remember is that in Linux you don't download software from the web with your browser. You get it from your distro's repository using your package manager. That means that it's guaranteed safe, virus-free, and you don't need to bother about versions. You'll automatically get a version that is compatible with the rest of your system.

Browsers like chrome (and some other programs too) have a built-in update facility, but you're probably better off not using it. Stick to the repository.

Mint uses Debian's apt package management system which has a graphical front end called synaptic. In addition, there's a simplified update program which is specific to Mint and which is designed to be novice-friendly. You might want to start off by using that.
 
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:44 AM   #5
BW-userx
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the first thing is, look it up in MINT how to install stuff, I am not sure what they use, apt-get, pacman, scoobie-do, or whatever, but you need to familiarize yourself with their application that they use to implement their installing and dealing with the applications from their repos.

here is a good place to start

If you have a google account for most everything, Firefox can deal with that too, just set your homepage to google.com

Last edited by BW-userx; 10-14-2016 at 09:45 AM.
 
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:50 AM   #6
BW-userx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
The main thing you need to remember is that in Linux you don't download software from the web with your browser.
I beg to differ. for the less squeamish it is called source code that can be compiled and installed to the system.
 
Old 10-14-2016, 09:58 AM   #7
snowpine
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Hi SwiftlyGifted,

To answer your specific question, Google Chrome gives you the choice of two downloads: "64-bit .deb (For Debian/Ubuntu)" or "64-bt .rpm (For Fedora/openSUSE)" and you should choose the first option (64-bit .deb) if you are running the 64-bit version of Linux Mint. (If you are running 32-bit Linux Mint, then you are out of luck; Google has chosen not to support you.)

I should mention however that Google Chrome is an exception to the rule. Normally there is no need to surf the web and download installers--that is the "Windows way" of doing things! Most of the time in Linux Mint, we can easily install any application we want with just a few mouse clicks. The way to do this is through the Software Manager. This will give you access to thousands of trusted open-source applications that are well-tested to work with your specific Linux Mint release. Easy and no hassle!

The reason Google Chrome is not available in the Software Manager is that it is a proprietary, "closed-source" product of Google Corporation. (You can, however, install Chromium browser through the Software Manager. Chromium provides most of the functionality of Chrome, but is open-source.)
 
Old 10-14-2016, 10:16 AM   #8
linux4evr5581
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Open your terminal then type the name of the program you wish to download. It will then output what exactly you should type to download that program correctly. Then type sudo apt-get install nameOfprogram (this is the part of the reason why Linux is more secure, because you don't have to go out to the worldwideweb on your browser to download programs; instead they come from trusted repositories when you issue the terminal command apt-get)

Last edited by linux4evr5581; 10-14-2016 at 10:22 AM.
 
Old 10-14-2016, 10:57 AM   #9
Habitual
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwiftlyGifted View Post
My main problem is that I didn't know as much as I thought I did. I'm new to Linux. Windows 10 was my former OS. But I'm told that Linux is more secure when it comes to many things. So here I am. However when trying to install Google Chrome it asks me which version to install and all I know is that I use Linux Mint. I have Firefox installed so I'm not sure if I even need Google Chrome. I'm just really lost and it's not a good feeling. I want to install some software on this laptop but I don't know where to begin.
https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=90&t=97158 is a good start.
and https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/Home is another.

typing
Code:
welcome
into Alt+F2 and hit enter, and have a look around.
 
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Old 10-14-2016, 11:48 AM   #10
Germany_chris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
The main thing you need to remember is that in Linux you don't download software from the web with your browser. You get it from your distro's repository using your package manager. That means that it's guaranteed safe, virus-free, and you don't need to bother about versions. You'll automatically get a version that is compatible with the rest of your system.

Browsers like chrome (and some other programs too) have a built-in update facility, but you're probably better off not using it. Stick to the repository.

Mint uses Debian's apt package management system which has a graphical front end called synaptic. In addition, there's a simplified update program which is specific to Mint and which is designed to be novice-friendly. You might want to start off by using that.

If you install Chrome from the web it add the Chrome repo. The only other way is manually add the Chrome repo and apt install or apt-get install.
 
Old 10-14-2016, 08:32 PM   #11
Soadyheid
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Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
The main thing you need to remember is that in Linux you don't download software from the web with your browser.

Originally Posted by BW-userx
I beg to differ. for the less squeamish it is called source code that can be compiled and installed to the system.
I'd respectfully like to say that the Op is a new entrant into the Linux World and would be better to install packages via Mint's Synaptic Package Manager or the included graphic Software Manager. Once he/she has been using Linux for a while and is more confident, alternative methods like apt-get and compiling from source code are useful tools.

Start simple, Linux has many ways to skin a cat!

Play Bonny!

 
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Old 10-14-2016, 09:03 PM   #12
BW-userx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soadyheid View Post
I'd respectfully like to say that the Op is a new entrant into the Linux World and would be better to install packages via Mint's Synaptic Package Manager or the included graphic Software Manager. Once he/she has been using Linux for a while and is more confident, alternative methods like apt-get and compiling from source code are useful tools.

Start simple, Linux has many ways to skin a cat!

Play Bonny!

I'd like to say, my comment is and was to let the NEW user/comer to Linux know just that, there is more then one way to skin a cat, therefore he should not be given biogas information from the git go. But instead given the opened mindedness that Linux has to offer. just that, there is more then one way to skin a cat.

let him know the options that he or she has up front. Not give them or tell them off the bat something that is not true to lead them into thinking this is the only way that one can do something in Linux by making statements such as this, thus closing that window to all of the different ways to skin that cat.

Code:
The main thing you need to remember is that in Linux you don't download software from the web with your browser.
that is a lie, and misleading. even with Windows one does not always download software from the web . it is called buying a dvd/cd and installing it.
what that other said should not have been said to anyone.


the OP being a newbe I was once a newbe, and I am thankful that no one mislead me like that telling me that one does not download software from the web with the browser (to install it). else I'd not have been learning about how to do something Linux is capable of while still learning apt-get at the same time.

just because he or she is a newbe does not mean that they are automatically so (stupid) slow they cannot learn more than one thing at a time. or that they should be told that their is only one way to do something in Linux at the start. only for them to find out that was a lie. or trying to spread someone else's phobias onto another as the case maybe.

if you where just adding your two cents, well that is still my story and I am sticking to it. cheers

Last edited by BW-userx; 10-14-2016 at 09:14 PM.
 
Old 10-15-2016, 09:38 PM   #13
Fred Caro
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The default browser is firefox and it works very well compared to chrome on Windows. It's worth exploring settings and some add ons (do not carried away) etc.

You can install stuff from the net but the security of that is more advanced. Repositories are there (yes they -repositories- are on the net but protected by default) for your convenience and security; this is partly why Linux is more secure than Windows.

Install methods are spread over gui's like "synaptic package manager", "Discover" ,and others, but also the command line which is probably the best way to install programs, although not the only way.

Fred.
 
Old 10-15-2016, 11:46 PM   #14
crazypenguin
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For Linux Mint I would recommend using Synaptic or Software Manager for someone just getting started with Linux.

There will be plenty of time later on to learn how install from the command line and terminal window.
 
Old 10-16-2016, 08:30 PM   #15
Soadyheid
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@BW-userx
Quote:
just because he or she is a newbe does not mean that they are automatically so (stupid) slow they cannot learn more than one thing at a time. or that they should be told that their is only one way to do something in Linux at the start.
My apologies if you thought I was in any way criticising your response. From the Op's original post
Quote:
My main problem is that I didn't know as much as I thought I did. I'm new to Linux. Windows 10 was my former OS. But I'm told that Linux is more secure when it comes to many things.
I reckoned that a simple answer was what was required; "use the package manager". Compiling from source is obviously also a valid answer but maybe a bit more scary from the Op's point of view?

Having read quite a few Newbie questions over the years I note that some of the answers given can be a bit off putting to someone who doesn't know much about Linux and is just starting out.

Member:
Quote:
...Open a terminal
Newbie:
Quote:
What's a terminal?
It can sometimes be difficult judging what level of response you should give, I try to give what I feel is the uncomplicated answer. So saying, I have to smile at some "Newbie" questions as whoever is asking the question is assuming they know very little while in my estimation they're just a couple of points off being a rocket scientist!

Yup! That's my

Play Bonny!


Last edited by Soadyheid; 10-16-2016 at 08:32 PM. Reason: Spellnig!
 
  


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