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Old 01-01-2009, 01:36 PM   #1
hansmax
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"No root file system defined"


I am trying to install Ubuntu 8.04.1 on my second computer. I have Windows XP on the C drive, and I have a D drive empty, that is formatted ext3, and a J drive, which is formatted FAT32. (These are all on one 200 GB hard drive.) I did the resizing, repartitioning and reformatting with PartitionMagic 8.0. I am now trying to install Ubuntu on the D drive from the live disk, and when I go into choosing a drive to install it on, get a message to the effect that there is no root file system on the drive and I need to establish that, so I tried to edit the partition (which is set to "do not use this partition" by default. It seemed that choosing "ext3 journaling partition" would be the most logical choice, but it just kicks me back to the "no root filing system is defined" message. What am I doing wrong? Any help would be appreciated. It's good to be here, and I imagine that I will be back often, since my New Years resolution is to finally get serious about Linux. Even though I have three paid for copies of WinXP, I'd give them up in a heartbeat for something that doesn't make a routine system update the equivalent of buying a new house.
 
Old 01-01-2009, 01:57 PM   #2
brianL
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It would have been best if you had left D and J as unformatted, unallocated space. Ubuntu has the facilities to create and format partitions during installation. You could delete D and J during Ubuntu's install, choose the Manual partitioning when you get to that stage, delete D and J, then create an ext3 partition for Ubuntu, swap, and a fat32 partition.
 
Old 01-01-2009, 02:07 PM   #3
onebuck
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Hi,

If you have the partition(s) allocated on the hdd (/dev/hda) then all you need to do is format them. It sounds like you did not provide space for a swap partition. Depending on how much memory is in your system, you may not need a swap. But just in case I would create one. Shrink the second or just create a logical partition within the second partition allocated space then create the swap & your linux partition(s) within that , i.e. /dev/hda3 logical then /dev/hda5(as swap), /dev/hda6 (as '/').

You could boot any Livecd or even the Install cd to get to a 'cli' (command line). Then you could use the curses based 'cfdisk' to make your partition changes. Or you could use the GNU/Linux 'fdisk' to do the partitioning.

After the write of the partition table I always like to insure the kernel partition table update by re-booting the system. I will then create my filesystem and prepare my swap by;

Code:
~#mkswap -c /dev/hda5              #create the swap
~#mke2fs -c -L MYroot -j /dev/hda6 #create ext3 filesystem
You can 'man mkswap' & 'man mke2fs' to get a better understanding.

You could always do a LQ search on this subject since it has been covered a lot.

These links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 01-01-2009, 02:19 PM   #4
hansmax
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Thanks for the info, BrianL and onebuck. I have a lot to work on. I think I will try partitionMagic with this, since I'm not too familiar with the command console yet. How big should I make the swap partition. The computer has one gig of RAM. Would a gig for swapping be sufficient?
 
Old 01-01-2009, 02:31 PM   #5
jailbait
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hansmax View Post
Thanks for the info, BrianL and onebuck. I have a lot to work on. I think I will try partitionMagic with this, since I'm not too familiar with the command console yet. How big should I make the swap partition. The computer has one gig of RAM. Would a gig for swapping be sufficient?
512Meg swap space is plenty unless you use the suspend to disk function. Then you will need 1.5G.

--------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 01-01-2009, 02:51 PM   #6
hansmax
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Thanks for the info, jailbait. I have a lot to do, so I will get at it. And thanks to all of you.
 
Old 01-01-2009, 03:34 PM   #7
hansmax
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Well, it went well for a while. It installed the system files, and while it was cleaning up and getting ready to finish up, the screen slowly faded to black and stayed there. I rebooted,got the MB splashscreen and boot selection screen, then picked Ubuntu to boot into, and again, a black screen. I shut down and rebooted into Windows XP, which worked fine, so I doubt it's the monitor. Maybe a conflict between my Intel onboard video and Unbunt? How the heck would I start to fix something like this?
 
Old 01-01-2009, 03:44 PM   #8
jailbait
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hansmax View Post

while it was cleaning up and getting ready to finish up, the screen slowly faded to black and stayed there.
It might be a screen saver in the BIOS or video controller. Try moving the mouse every five minutes.

------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 01-01-2009, 04:16 PM   #9
hansmax
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I found other advice that said try Ctr+Alt+F1, which actually showed me Ubuntu, so I can get in, I guess, but not without doing that first. I'm putting this issue on the second burner, and concentrating on the wireless card, which does not seem to be recognized. Once I get that, it will be easier to deal with this issue. Right now I'm dealing with this on a different computer that does have internet. If I can't figure the card out, I'm sure I will be back here for that, too.
 
Old 01-03-2009, 04:01 PM   #10
hansmax
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I tried the reinstall without importing any settings, and it worked well, did not lose the monitor this time. Also got the wireless card working with no effort. However, when I changed the monitor resolution, I lost the monitor again. Ctrl+Alt+F1 does not restore it, but it does get me into a command line. Is there anything I can enter here to get the default resolution back, in hopes that this will restore the monitor? Thanks for all the help you've given so far.
 
Old 01-03-2009, 04:23 PM   #11
hansmax
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I tried running sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg, but after going through about a half a dozen screens asking me about how I wanted the keyboard, it just dumped me back at the command prompt. Maybe a reinstall would be easiest, although this is kind of fun and interesting. I'll wait a while to see if there are any replies.
 
Old 01-03-2009, 04:35 PM   #12
hansmax
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Well, I tried the "Try to fix X-Server" option and that did the trick. The only question I have now is is there any way to reset screen resolution without messing it up again? Otherwise I'll just live with it until I get a little more expertise.
 
  


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