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Old 02-28-2007, 08:55 AM   #1
persisgilgal3
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Newbie to linux


hi everyone,

I want to learn as much as possible about linux and I want you all to help me do so. I have worked a little with redhat some time back, but now I dont remember a thing. Where do I start and how?? Also how is linux advantageous over windows??
 
Old 02-28-2007, 09:27 AM   #2
pixellany
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I am going to ask that this be moved to Linux--Newbie.

To start in Linux, you need to.....start!! Get any of the various distributions that come in a "live CD" format. Go to distrowatch.com and pick anything in the top ten on their "hit list".

You can run from a live CD without disturbing anything on you computer. Then, you can install once you have your feet wet.

Quote:
Also how is linux advantageous over windows??
This is best answered by you---once you have tried it. Also, look at the "All new Windows vs. Linux megathread" here

Last edited by pixellany; 02-28-2007 at 09:30 AM.
 
Old 02-28-2007, 09:42 AM   #3
trashbird1240
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Oh boy, this should open several cans of annelids.

What are your basic computing needs? Why do you want to switch to Linux?

The best way to learn about Linux is to read, read, read, and use, use, use. The book that taught me everything I needed to know to feel [minimally] comfortable with Linux was Running Linux from O'Reilly. Also, there is a huge amount of free documentation on the web and on any Linux machine if you can get access to one (e.g., booting a Live CD My intro to Linux was the Wikipedia article.

Now, how is Linux advantageous over Windows?

1. It's a whole different system, so thinking of "advantages" is somewhat moot; rather, you should think about how it might better serve your needs, philosophy, or fit in better with you cognitively. I know that I feel much more in control of my computing, and like a much more competent computer user using Linux. This is not because I have to be, rather because Linux allows me to be. Linux, and Unix in general make a lot more sense to me than Windows. Someone on another forum challenged me to say "are these applications necessarily more powerful on Linux than on Windows?" My reply was "No -- I'm more powerful on Linux." Thinking of Linux as an "alternative" to Windows is somewhat misleading since it uses a completely different paradigm of computing and has a separate history -- it was not designed as an alternative to Windows. It was designed as a clone of Unix, to serve the needs of scientists, engineers and others who demand high performance computing (as Unix had done all along, with one slight change: Linux is free software). Windows on the other hand, was designed to be marketable.

Now keeping all that in mind...

2. Linux has few of the performance problems of Windows. Furthermore, it has more secure code and a better, more up to date set of code than Windows, contrary to what Steve Ballmer would have you believe. Independent of your needs, Linux will probably run better for what you want. There are exceptions, but if you're like me (I'm a scientist and don't play games) Linux is far superior, just because it doesn't give me the headaches that Windows did. As an example, my Slackware box at the office has been running for 19 days and 40 minutes; with Windows on the same hardware, I would have had to reboot it at least once. Linux/UNIX uptime is usually measured in years, not days.

And for people who say "You can't get that on Linux", you either can, or you can get something better (in terms of applications). LIke I said, Linux was not built as a substitute for Windows, so the applications don't carry over all that often. You can use it that way, but I'm of the school of thought who thinks you'll get more out of it if you use it the Unix way.

Running Linux is a good all-around introduction to the Unix way of doing things, e.g., alternatives to word processors, using the command line. Check it out. Even an older edition will tell you stuff that will make you way more familiar with Linux.

Joel
 
Old 02-28-2007, 09:44 AM   #4
trashbird1240
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Oh yeah -- a good way to start is to try a Live CD, I recommend PCLinuxOS 0.93a -- a new version is coming out but wait till it's stable.

Also, try any of the other billion that are available as LiveCDs. Just pop it in, boot up and you've got a full system. Pretty sweet.

Joel
 
Old 02-28-2007, 09:46 AM   #5
XavierP
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Moved: This thread is more suitable in Linux-Newbie and has been moved accordingly to help your thread/question get the exposure it deserves.
 
Old 02-28-2007, 03:07 PM   #6
jkillah1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trashbird1240
The book that taught me everything I needed to know to feel [minimally] comfortable with Linux was Running Linux from O'Reilly.
How weird! I just picked that book up from the library a week ago! I'm gonna start reading it now, screw Linux for Dummies =P
 
Old 03-01-2007, 11:04 AM   #7
trashbird1240
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You will find the same amount of humour and a lot more depth in O'Reilly books than in "Dummies" books. If you're considering Linux, you've already removed yourself from the "Dummies" segment of society.

Joel
 
Old 03-01-2007, 03:26 PM   #8
jkillah1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trashbird1240
You will find the same amount of humour and a lot more depth in O'Reilly books than in "Dummies" books. If you're considering Linux, you've already removed yourself from the "Dummies" segment of society.

Joel
Thanks. Also, I'd just like to say that I used the DVD in the Linux for Dummies book to install Fedora Core 6! It's kinda cool, but I can't get it to work with my Linksys WiFi card (WMP4GS)... If anyone has any tips, I'd highly appreciate them! Keep in mind, I've just installed linux, and I have no clue how to use it yet! But I'd like to at least get the internet up. I have partitioned my hard-drive and have XP and Fedora. I'd ween myself off from XP completely, but I don't know how to get my video games and internet to work on linux...

Thanks for the support, this really is a helpful community of people, which I think is the greatest weapon Linux has against Microsoft.
 
Old 03-02-2007, 10:07 AM   #9
trashbird1240
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The first step is finding out which chipset your wireless card has, then finding an opensource driver, preferably one meant for linux.

For example, I have a Belkin FD7050 wireless USB adapter that has the Ralink rt73 chipset; there's a linux driver for that at rt2x00.serialmonkey.com.

Google is your friend. When you get error messages, just paste them in to the Google search box and you'll probably find a solution in minutes. That is the best way I've found to find solutions to particular problems. There are a few notable exceptions, such as kernel panics. Overall though, Google is an excellent way to find solutions.

I suggest you lose any fear of the command line you have quickly. It's the most efficient way of getting at things.

Joel
 
  


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