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Old 09-02-2015, 12:03 PM   #16
Ihatewindows522
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schneidz View Post
i would boot a live-usb on the usb drive. then run something like:
Code:
dd if=/dev/sda of=/home/liveuser/sda.iso bs=8192
this assumes that the usb disk is bigger than the internal disk.
caution: dd can be very destructive and care should be given which device is being written to.
related:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...es-4175551279/
Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
I have similar reservations.

<soapbox>
"dd" is absolutely the worst option for a backup ... other than no backup at all
</soapbox>
I'd try to keep things "as simple as possible, but no simpler."

If you use dd, be EXTREMELY CAREFUL. It will do whatever you tell it and won't ask questions. Even Clonezilla can be dangerous (I know, I've done it!!)
 
Old 09-03-2015, 07:04 AM   #17
Adams Seven
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Thanks again for those contributing advice. I'm painfully aware of how new I am at all this, and grateful to seasoned hands for taking time with me.

I'm going to swallow my nervousness and taking another long look at Clonezilla ... and perhaps DD, too, despite its potential dangers.
 
Old 09-03-2015, 01:43 PM   #18
Doug G
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One advantage of learning the dd cloning method is that it works for other systems. I usually never have enough room on a usb stick to clone anything, but an external hd in a drive dock works well.

A couple days ago I took the time to use dd to clone my 500gb windows drive prior to upgrading to windows 10. I used a fedora 22 usb system and a usb3 external drive dock with a 2tb disk, dd took a couple hours. Was I glad I took the time to make the clone, the windows 10 upgrade went badly and left my computer in an un-bootable state with a corrupted partition table. Restoring the dd image took a couple more hours and this windows 7 machine was back in operation.

Oh yeah, another advantage is you can take the image to a linux machine, mount the iso, and have access to all the data that was on the orignal disk you cloned, without needig to restore the clone image.

Last edited by Doug G; 09-03-2015 at 01:45 PM.
 
Old 09-03-2015, 08:49 PM   #19
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I spent several hours with Clonzilla today, but I'm afraid I can't report good results.

I made the Clonzilla optical disk, as instructed, booted into it, followed the prompts, and started imaging my SSD to an external USB drive. (And that seemed to be the called for choice: imaging from one drive to another while running on the CD, and not cloning).

Clonzilla reported errors, but also success messages. I saw little choice but to wait and let the time-consuming process finish. It did finish, and deposited a big new file on the USB drive. I rebooted into the Clonzilla CD, and successfully copied this image onto the second SSD.

"This is never going to work," I thought ... and guessed correctly! On reboot, the second SSD gave me a grub prompt.

Clonzilla obviously has a lot of fans, but I need more hand holding. I couldn't interpret the error messages that flashed by so quickly, didn't know what was wrong or what I could fix.

I still have Win 7 on the computer, and may look for a Windows program that will do the job instead.

Despite my frustration: thanks again to those who took the time to try to help a noob.
 
Old 09-03-2015, 09:08 PM   #20
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Clones are completely overrated on Linux systems. Windows systems are another issue, they're such a pain to get back up and running from a normal backup that you pretty much HAVE to have a clone or you'll spend days/weeks reinstalling and reconfiguring everything after a reinstall.

Linux is completely different for three reasons:

1) Basically everything you will ever touch regarding your user interface - application configurations and settings, DE configurations and settings, panel configurations and settings, keyboard shortcuts, etc. is stored in your home directory, which is completely portable. Your home directory is your master key. It holds everything...just rsync your home directory onto another machine running the same distro with the same DE installed, and it will look and act exactly like your system, including all of your customizations, all of your configurations, even the web pages you had open when your system crashed! That's no joke...I had a laptop die about a month ago in a hotel room halfway across the world from my home. It locked up during a system update, and a hard shutdown corrupted the filesystem. The OS was corrupted beyond repair, but my home directory was fine. I had a recent backup, but I made a new one of my home directory from a live USB right before reinstalling. I reinstalled, restored my home directory, opened up my web browser, and it said it had experienced an unclean shutdown and asked if I would like to re-open my tabs, I clicked yes, and all of the web pages I had open when the system locked up popped right back up without issue!

2) System-wide configurations, such as network configs, network share configs, service configs, etc. are stored in /etc. I wouldn't say this is completely portable, but you should have no issue with making a backup of /etc, and then restoring individual files onto a new system to configure your services as desired. Spend a week getting /etc/samba/smb.conf working perfectly, make a backup of it, and you never have to deal with it again.

3) Programs are not installed with individual downloaded .exe files that require a painful button-clicking GUI nightmare for each one, they're installed through a central package manager that will always have a convenient and consistent command line interface. Every time you install a package, make a note of it. Keep a list of all of the packages you've installed over the weeks/months/years. If you need to reinstall your OS, with literally ONE COMMAND you can reinstall every program and service you had on the old system.

With those notes in mind, and a full backup of your system (not a clone, just a regular rsync while your system is running), you can reinstall your OS, reinstall all of your programs, restore your home directory which includes all customizations, configurations, and settings for your user, restore any residual system configs in /etc, and be completely up and running within an hour, no exaggeration. That's probably about as much time as it would take you to restore from a disk clone, yes? But with this method you don't need to make a disk clone, you don't need to boot into a live distro to do it, which means you are MUCH more likely to keep regular backups than you would with a clone. AND if you screw something up, like delete or corrupt a file accidentally, you have a full navigable backup you can pull from, not a giant binary blob of a clone that's only really useful for full system restoration. ALSO, rsync supports incremental backups with hard-linking, so you can have separate, individual, FULL SYSTEM daily backups, that only take up the space of one full backup plus whatever has changed from day to day, and each one is fully navigable and fully restorable, and you can delete any of them at-will to clear up space without risking corruption of the others.

For the record, I would NEVER trust a clone made on a live, mounted, system disk. Ever. I don't care what software it is or what OS you're running, it's a recipe for corruption. Either boot into a live distro to clone your disk on a REGULAR basis, or don't use disk cloning for your backups, period.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 09-03-2015 at 09:22 PM.
 
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:20 PM   #21
syg00
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
For the record, I would NEVER trust a clone made on a live, mounted, system disk. Ever. I don't care what software it is or what OS you're running, it's a recipe for corruption. Either boot into a live distro to clone your disk on a REGULAR basis, or don't use disk cloning for your backups, period.
Whilst I too always use a liveCD for clone type operations, it should be noted that Linux filesystems support filesystem freeze, and the snapshot implementations (LVM and btrfs - and presumably ZFS) all invoke this for you prior to a snap.
I make use of this extensively to generate syncpoints so I can either backup the snap or roll-back in need. Entirely safe in my experience.
 
Old 09-04-2015, 06:01 PM   #22
Adams Seven
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Thanks for the thoughts, suicidaleggroll and syg00. Suicidaleggroll, I'll keep your thoughts in mind when contemplating an alternative to a disk clone.

I like to update these threads with outcomes. I dl'd the free Macrium Reflect for Windows and successfully cloned the dual-boot drive to a second drive. That's what I was after, and I got it. Macrium let me do it with Win 7 running.

On the not-so-bright side, for reasons unknown, the cloning process hosed both my standard user and administrator desktops on the Windows source drive (not the target), and I had to go into System Restore from Task Manager to make them right again. A separate topic, for a Windows discussion board.
 
Old 09-04-2015, 07:13 PM   #23
jpollard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adams Seven View Post
Thanks for the thoughts, suicidaleggroll and syg00. Suicidaleggroll, I'll keep your thoughts in mind when contemplating an alternative to a disk clone.

I like to update these threads with outcomes. I dl'd the free Macrium Reflect for Windows and successfully cloned the dual-boot drive to a second drive. That's what I was after, and I got it. Macrium let me do it with Win 7 running.

On the not-so-bright side, for reasons unknown, the cloning process hosed both my standard user and administrator desktops on the Windows source drive (not the target), and I had to go into System Restore from Task Manager to make them right again. A separate topic, for a Windows discussion board.
That sounds like the Windows system was not actually shutdown - but went into the half hibernation that Microsoft calls "shutdown". This state leaves the Windows filesystem in a corrupted state - and when copied may cause the use of the filesystem to attempt "repair" before copying. Then, when Windows is resumed (not rebooted), the filesystem is corrupted because it isn't in the state Windows left it in.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 08:57 PM   #24
jefro
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There is nothing wrong with this product either from what I see. Macrium Reflect Free
 
  


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