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Old 09-27-2012, 03:49 PM   #1
cowtown_dba
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Question Newbie requesting Linux distro recommendations


Hello all!

I am new to learning how to use Linux, and have never installed Linux yet. My company is starting to use RedHat.

I would appreciate any suggestions or recommendations about a Linux distribution that would be a good place for me to start my Linux education. If you could provide the name and version, then perhaps a reason why you feel it would be a good choice.

Thank you to everyone for your advice.

Mark
 
Old 09-27-2012, 03:58 PM   #2
snowpine
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If you need to learn Red Hat for work, then either CentOS (free clone of Red Hat, providing older but very stable software) or Fedora (fast-moving development release with the latest kernel and applications) are my recommendations.

If you want to learn something completely different from Red Hat then Ubuntu or Mint are very popular for beginning Linux users.
 
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:00 PM   #3
mennohellinga
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Hi,

If you want a distro that resembles Red Hat, use Fedora, http://fedoraproject.org
I hate Fedora.

If you want a distro that 'just works' on your desktop at home, use OpenSUSE, http://www.opensuse.org
Don't use it on a laptop, wireless networking is a big hassle.

If you want a distro that 'just works' on your laptop, use Ubuntu, www.ubuntu.com
I kinda like it.

If you want to learn about Linux and don't mind spending an afternoon installing and building, use Archlinux, www.archlinux.org
I love it.

Or Slackware, www.slackware.com, which I've never used.

If you REALLY want to learn about how Linux works and don't mind spending an entire weekend building a system, use Gentoo, www.gentoo.org
I still haven't been able to finish installing.

If you are a masochist and want to gain a deep understanding of Linux, build Linux From Scratch, http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

I started in Kubuntu, then moved on to Fedora, then to Archlinux. I have made a few short steps towards Gentoo but never continued. I have Ubuntu and Linux Mint in virtual machines.

You will find a good distro choosing tool at http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/index.php

Last edited by mennohellinga; 09-27-2012 at 04:02 PM.
 
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:05 PM   #4
ButterflyMelissa
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Hey Mark,

Okay, lemme be the first to welcome you to Linux and the forum.
Linux is about choice, so, you've got your pick, a small rundown:

Fedora - because it's closes to RedHat, stuff is broken and you (the user) are actually the "beta tester", you'll learn to fix things
CentOS - because it's closest to the server RedHat, stable and fault free, had one running (still does) without any hitch whatsoever
Linux Mint - easy install, Debian based
Debian - the oldest distro and very stable, somewhat bare against Mint but it's the refernce
the 'buntu sisters - Ubuntu, http://xubuntu.org/ and Kubuntu - very complete and easy/nice to use
Arch Linux - not really for beginners but the cleanest distro around, personally...not for beginners, unless (like you) they want to learn Linux from the command line
There are others, but, if you're still "shopping", check this questionaire...

Enjoy Linux!

Thor
 
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:35 PM   #5
TobiSGD
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I would not recommend Fedora at all to learn how to administrate Red Hat systems, they are simply to different, keep alone the different init systems.

Having said that, if you want to learn how to work with Red Hat systems I would recommend CentOS, since it is a free clone of Red Hat.
If you want to learn generally how to work with Linux I would recommend to begin with one of the beginner-friendly distributions, like Mint, Mepis or Ubuntu.
If you are willing to go with a somewhat steeper learning curve I would recommend to go for Slackware, Arch or Gentoo, since those distributions actively encourage (and partially force) the user to learn.
 
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:11 PM   #6
chrism01
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It may not be the most user friendly for a home user, but in your particular case, go Centos.
Its going to be less confusing to stick with the same thing as used at work.
(as above, Centos is a free rebuild of RHEL; includes updates, but not support)
You can always branch out later if you want.
 
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Old 09-27-2012, 11:45 PM   #7
pardoxx
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I suggest to study fisrt one distro at a time before moving it to the next level.
if you like redhat then go for redhat first study the basic installation, nature and environment of GUI, command line interface
and last basic troubleshooting of it.
 
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:30 AM   #8
cowtown_dba
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Thank you!

Thank you to all for the great advice. I am looking forward to this new adventure!
 
Old 10-01-2012, 08:58 AM   #9
aristocratic
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From above:

If you want a distro that 'just works' on your desktop at home, use OpenSUSE, http://www.opensuse.org
Don't use it on a laptop, wireless networking is a big hassle.

So now you tell me. LOL. It has been a headache indeed. Maybe I should switch distros.
 
  


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