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Old 02-17-2014, 09:27 PM   #1
Nato85
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New to Linux Questions and have some Questions


Hello everyone. My name is Nathan and I am wanting to dive into the world of Linux.

With that being said. I have a few questions and in order for you guys to answer my questions, I will explain the question as best as I can.

I am a computer technician, been one for about 15 years, I have primarily used Windows but I have used Linux distro's in the past such as Linux Mint and Ubuntu.

I also love building my own computers to which I will list down a few parts inside that may be helpful when I ask a question or two.

CPU: INTEL i7 3770K
MOBO: ASUS ROG Maximus Formula V
RAM: CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB
GPU: ASUS 680GTX
SSD: SAMSUNG 840 Pro 128GB
HDD: WESTERN DIGITAL Black 2TB
LCD: 2 X 24" BENQ Monitors

Question 1 : I am a gamer, always been a gamer, always will be a gamer, probably the only reason that I have stuck with Windows. I have noticed that Linux is accommodating gamers more and more every day. The main game I would be playing would be between Star Wars: The Old Republic and World of Warcraft. What is required to install these games, and if the games are already installed into Windows into a separate folder. Can I copy the folder to my new Linux installation and run the game? Or is there more required.

Question 2 : I am not going to ask the question "What is the best Linux Distro?" Because I believe that question is stupid and I would only get opinions instead of facts. I understand that each distro of Linux has both good and bad qualities. I have used Ubuntu and Linux Mint before, so in saying that, what is the recommended Linux Distro for me as a gamer be, and why?

Question 3 : The only thing that has ever turned me off Linux before is the driver installations. I have had problems in the past getting correct drivers and getting them working properly under Linux. With the parts I have listed above, how hard would it be to find drivers, download them and install them.

Question 4 : I have some software on my Windows PC that I love, however going over to Linux, I would understand that I would not be able to use it. One of the main pieces of software that is important to me at the moment would be TeamViewer. When I am at work, I use Team Viewer to remote control my PC at home to check emails and move files around. Is it possible for me to use Team Viewer on my office computer which is a Windows computer, to connect to my computer at home which would have a Linux Distro on it? I am not too concerned about crap like Microsoft Office as I can easily go to something like Thunderbird, and I am already using Mozilla software for my web browser as I am currently using Pale Moon. To watch videos and to play Music, I am currently using VLC Media player which I have an understanding that there is already a version available for Linux.

Question 5 : I currently have a 2TB external drive at the moment and every Tuesday I run an XCOPY script that copies everything from my 2TB Western Digital Black Hard Drive. I have also set it up where it only copies modified files or new entries to save on backup time. Is there something like that I can use under Linux?

Question 6 : All my games that I have installed have been installed to my 2TB Hard Drive. Is that going to be a problem running them in that directory on Linux?

The reason I am interested in going to Linux is I already understand that Linux is a better operating system. I have always wanted to operate under Linux but I have been scared off before as the installs I have done never seemed to work properly, and it has been a struggle to get the simplest things running, mind you, this was 3 years ago the last time I tried a Linux install and I have learned a great deal since then.

I hope I have not been too vague in my questions, and just need some one to explain to me what I need to do in order to get a good Linux install going.

I eagerly await your reply.
 
Old 02-17-2014, 09:46 PM   #2
Emerson
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1. Not sure about gaming.
2. All Linux'es are the same regarding gaming and drivers. They run the the same operating system - Linux.
3. You do not download drivers and install them, unless you are using LFS or similar drivers are available to you thru package manager.
4. You can use Wine or virtual machines.
5. There is a plethora of backup solutions in Unix world. Starting but not limited to rsync.
6. See [1].
 
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:58 PM   #3
dolphin_oracle
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question 1- probably not. you'll need installation as the installation routines scatter stuff all over the system anyway. check out playonlinux and wine.

question 2 - I leave this to others

question 3 - hardware support is pretty good these days. cutting edge hardware is sometimes an issue, but I think you are probably ok.

question 4 - teamviewer- I think so. Here's the teamviewer linux download page: http://www.teamviewer.com/en/download/linux.aspx

question 5 - most distros come with a version of rsync, which will do what you want. (grsync and luckybackup are examples of gui front ends that come to mind).

question 6. - just like moving to a new version of windows, you'll likely have to reinstall anything you try to run in linux under wine.

In your case, I would consider dual-booting windows with linux until you get some hands on time with linux. You don't have to blow away your windows install. I boot windows for what gaming I do, which admitingly isn't much anymore. Linux is different, and its not windows. Its great, but keep your windows install around while you learn the ropes. I don't know much about distros that are good for gaming, but the world tends to make things for ubuntu, so that may be a good place to start (at least the ubuntu-based distros).
 
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Old 02-18-2014, 12:37 PM   #4
DavidMcCann
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You may know these sites, but I thought I'd mention them
http://linuxappfinder.com/alternatives?page=3
http://www.winehq.org/
http://gamesonlinux.com/
http://www.linuxgames.com/
http://store.steampowered.com/

Both the games you mention are said to perform well under Wine.

As for the distro, my current recommendations are Mint and PCLinuxOS.
 
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Old 02-18-2014, 02:43 PM   #5
sgosnell
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Teamviewer certainly works on Linux, as long as you don't need to run it on an ARM CPU. My only complaint about Teamviewer is that there is no ARM version. But as long as your CPU is Intel or AMD, it will run fine, better in fact than on Windows, IME. I use it on my Linux laptop and on my Android phone and tablet to control my home server, and my mother's Windows machine. It's pretty much the same look and feel whatever OS you use.

Rsync will do everything that xcopy does, and more. Grsync gives you a GUI frontend if you want it. Making backups is one of the things Linux does best, and you can easily automate it with a cronjob, set to run at whatever time and frequency you like.

Linux will recognize and use whatever HDD you have, as long as you have the ntfs driver installed. Most distros come with it installed by default. You can mount the drive any number of ways, either manually or automatically, USB or internal to the PC.

I can't really answer the other questions. Drivers can sometimes be a problem, depending on the hardware, but I don't think it's any more than on Windows. But I don't have any exotic equipment, and I don't play games.

You can try out some distros via live CDs, or you can install VirtualBox and try them that way if you want, to see what you'll get, more or less. I started out with a Linux netbook, and soon abandoned Windows entirely, because there is nothing I need to do that I can't do in Linux, with far less frustration than on Windows. Now, when I have to deal with a Windows computer, I tend to get angry because it's so slow and complicated to get anything done.
 
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Old 02-18-2014, 06:07 PM   #6
Nato85
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It sounds like where there is a will, there is a way when it comes to gaming.

I have used Rsync in the past, have had a small issue setting it up on windows but i would imagine it would set up easier on Linux as I believe it was originally made for Linux

If I use a LiveCD, will it give me an accurate representation of the OS when it comes to what drivers it can give me and what it cant?

This only reason I ask about being able to install games to another hard drive instead of the main one as my SSD is only 128Gb in size, didnt want to fill my SSD up when i have a 2TB sitting next to it.


Could someone maybe give me a quick understanding how drivers are put on under Linux, i see someone said something about you dont download and install?
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:53 PM   #7
mostlyharmless
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The only driver per se that you'll probably want is the NVIDIA binary graphics driver. Depending on your ultimate distro, the method varies slightly, but is very straightforward. If you pick Mint, for example, you won't even have to do that part. Just try it and see! It'll be easier to help when/if you have a problem.
 
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Old 02-18-2014, 07:18 PM   #8
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nato85 View Post
Question 1 : I am a gamer, always been a gamer, always will be a gamer, probably the only reason that I have stuck with Windows. I have noticed that Linux is accommodating gamers more and more every day. The main game I would be playing would be between Star Wars: The Old Republic and World of Warcraft. What is required to install these games, and if the games are already installed into Windows into a separate folder. Can I copy the folder to my new Linux installation and run the game? Or is there more required.
You will have to use the Wine application layer to play those games. The Wine Application Database entries for Star Wars: The Old Republic show that that game works with some limitations, while WoW for any version with patch >=4.3 has a Platinum rating and should work without any problems.

Quote:
Question 2 : I am not going to ask the question "What is the best Linux Distro?" Because I believe that question is stupid and I would only get opinions instead of facts. I understand that each distro of Linux has both good and bad qualities. I have used Ubuntu and Linux Mint before, so in saying that, what is the recommended Linux Distro for me as a gamer be, and why?
Most games are currently tested for Ubuntu 12.04, sometimes later versions, so with Ubuntu or Mint you should be on the safe side.
Quote:
Question 3 : The only thing that has ever turned me off Linux before is the driver installations. I have had problems in the past getting correct drivers and getting them working properly under Linux. With the parts I have listed above, how hard would it be to find drivers, download them and install them.
The only proprietary drivers that will be needed from what I can see on your setup will be the proprietary Nvidia drivers, you can either get them from Nvidia and install them or (the recommended way) use the proprietary Nvidia drivers from your distribution, if available. Ubuntu (and with that Mint) has those drivers in the repositories and provides also an easy to use tool to install them.
For Nvidia users that want to play games the free nouveau drivers are currently not recommended.
Quote:
Question 4 : I have some software on my Windows PC that I love, however going over to Linux, I would understand that I would not be able to use it. One of the main pieces of software that is important to me at the moment would be TeamViewer. When I am at work, I use Team Viewer to remote control my PC at home to check emails and move files around. Is it possible for me to use Team Viewer on my office computer which is a Windows computer, to connect to my computer at home which would have a Linux Distro on it? I am not too concerned about crap like Microsoft Office as I can easily go to something like Thunderbird, and I am already using Mozilla software for my web browser as I am currently using Pale Moon. To watch videos and to play Music, I am currently using VLC Media player which I have an understanding that there is already a version available for Linux.
Can't comment on Teamviewer, I don't use that, but if you are satisfied with programs like Thunderbird and LibreOffice or OpenOffice as substitute for Microsoft's Office you will have no problems, Firefox and VLC exist for Linux also.
Quote:
Question 5 : I currently have a 2TB external drive at the moment and every Tuesday I run an XCOPY script that copies everything from my 2TB Western Digital Black Hard Drive. I have also set it up where it only copies modified files or new entries to save on backup time. Is there something like that I can use under Linux?
Definitely rsync, if you are able to write XCOPY backup scripts you will love its comfort in comparison.
Quote:
Question 6 : All my games that I have installed have been installed to my 2TB Hard Drive. Is that going to be a problem running them in that directory on Linux?
I have not tried it with an external disk, but running games in Wine from a NTFS formatted disk should not be a problem.
Quote:
The reason I am interested in going to Linux is I already understand that Linux is a better operating system.
Define better. I am a gamer and I still dual boot Linux and Windows, because some games just don't have a Linux version (though this is getting better since Steam exists on Linux and SteamOS is announced) and aren't working correctly in Wine. Though the number of those games is definitely decreasing.
 
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Old 02-18-2014, 09:36 PM   #9
Nato85
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I am loving the replies I am getting so far.

If i choose to use the LiveCD to start off with, will that give me an idea of what will work and what wont work?
 
Old 02-18-2014, 10:23 PM   #10
TobiSGD
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The LiveCD usually does not contain the Nvidia driver, so if you let that aside (I don't know how good the free driver handles a dual monitor setup), yes, it should show you what works. Your setup is fairly standard, so I would be surprised if you have problems.
 
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:25 PM   #11
dolphin_oracle
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pertaining to the liveCD - it will help you figure out if all your hardware will work, yes. You might be better off with a LiveUSB with persistence, that way you can try the proprietary drivers for your hardware. I believe you can do this with ubuntu.
 
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Old 02-19-2014, 06:08 PM   #12
Nato85
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I actually tried a UbuntuLive USB last night and I must say that I was impressed. Pretty much the only driver that it looked like I was missing was the NVIDIA driver which it gave me the option to download.

I really liked the Ubuntu Software Centre, because it kind of reminded me of an App Store, find what you want, and just click install.

I even got a game launched, however it gave me an error, which I would guess it was because I did not have some dependancy installed with Wine.
 
Old 02-19-2014, 07:21 PM   #13
Ryanms3030
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I know it was mentioned but SteamOS is on the way

http://store.steampowered.com/livingroom/SteamOS/
 
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