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Old 11-27-2010, 10:06 PM   #16
AnanthaP
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To the OP.
In linux, the kernel is standard and the windowning system is different. Most likely you have the gnome windowing system. So to get to the command prompt, create a shortcut on the desktop. In gnome, this is likely to be in Accessories->Terminal->Create_a_short_cut. Clicking on it will go to the command prompt which give you access to the basic linux commands. You can take it from there.

You can start by exploring the basic commands for which good material is essential. I myself started out in the early 1980s with "A User Guide to the UNIX System" by Rebecca Thomas and Jean Yates. To my surprise this is still available in Amazon for under $10.

Since you belong to a college, you probably have access to lots of similar books and free course materials.

OK

Last edited by AnanthaP; 11-27-2010 at 10:35 PM.
 
Old 11-28-2010, 08:19 AM   #17
MTK358
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GNOME is not the windowing system, X11 is. GNOME is a set of applications that run under X to provide a full desktop experience.
 
Old 11-28-2010, 11:04 AM   #18
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackendgame View Post
- ubuntu 9.10 (desktop & server edition)
- red hat linux 9.0
...
I have tried to install my version of red hat linux
...
i have been unsuccessful
...
But since I had the user's guide
Don't waste any more effort on an obsolete version of red hat. Newer RHEL is also not appropriate for your needs. It isn't that hard to find online tutorials for Linux, so you probably shouldn't waste time with an obsolete user's guide.

I don't know whether Ubuntu 9.10 is a good choice for you (but anyway better than Red Hat).

Quote:
I really want to learn the command prompt / user inter face side of the OS
I don't have even a guess what you mean by "user interface side of the OS". The central design philosophy of Unix (inherited by Linux) is to be more modular about such things. User interface is built into programs that run under the OS and you have a wide range of choices. User interface is not a characteristic of the OS itself.

As for command prompt, I don't want to start a flame war; You are obviously free to ignore my opinion. My opinion is that GUI is easier to learn and easier to use.

Quote:
Write code from scratch myself
You haven't said much about your current knowledge. Do you know any programming language now?

If you want to understand Linux internals, you need to know two programming languages: C and bash. (Some might claim bash is not a programming language, but the way it is used in Gnu/Linux internals, is certainly as a programming language).

Quote:
with my dream being to one day write my own OS.
To write the kind of software that could help you reach that, you should learn C++. Again, I don't want to start a flame war, but in my opinion the right subset of C++ is the best path to learning C (delay learning some of the uglier features of C by using std::string and std::cin, std::cout and similar C++ features instead). Also, I think C++ is the best available language for serious programming such as an OS and its supporting utilities. Linux itself and quite a lot of its related software are written in C even though C++ would be far more effective and maintainable. That doesn't mean next generations of such software should be written in C.

If you plan a basically command prompt path to learning Linux, you probably should focus sooner on learning bash than on learning C/C++. (A basically GUI path to learning Linux might involve learning just enough bash to understand individual startup scripts and not learning it until you actually get stuck in trying to understand each startup script).

Even more so, a basically command prompt path to learning Linux means you should select and learn a good text editor. One of the advantages of a more GUI approach is that you don't really need to learn a GUI text editor. Many of them are simple enough to just use them without learning them. That lets you focus sooner on other things you should learn (such as C++).
 
Old 11-28-2010, 12:49 PM   #19
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsfine View Post
My opinion is that GUI is easier to learn and easier to use.
The problem is that it teaches you zero about how Linux works inside. And if you come from Windows, you might get confused if you think it works similarly to Windows inside if you don't learn the command line.

In fact, many things I previously thought were just the way computers are turned out to be purely Windows concepts!
 
Old 11-29-2010, 01:13 AM   #20
chrism01
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Start with this: http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz It's great tutorial on Linux at the cli interface, covering loads of cmds with examples, also chapters on C under Linux.
I agree that RH9 is a waste of your time. Get the latest Centos (free version of RHEL), open up the cli terminal and away you go...
 
  


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