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Old 08-05-2014, 04:43 PM   #1
voido
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new to linux


Hey, I am new to linux but have been a Windows Admin for many years. I am at a point in my career that is preventing me from moving forward with sys admin jobs as most of them require linux experience. I have no experience with it and was hoping for some ideas on good training sources. Any advice is appreciated.

thankS

Jason
 
Old 08-05-2014, 04:52 PM   #2
notKlaatu
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https://www.edx.org/course/linuxfoun...roduction-1621

Might be a good start; the Linux Foundation is backing that.
 
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Old 08-05-2014, 04:54 PM   #3
jailbait
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voido View Post
I have no experience with it and was hoping for some ideas on good training sources.
I suggest that you buy various pieces of second hand computer equipment, put them together as a working system, and then install Linux on your home made system. I suggest that you install Fedora. Fedora is the free version of Red Hat which is the Linux distribution you are most likely to run into as a system administrator.

-------------------
Steve Stites
 
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Old 08-05-2014, 04:58 PM   #4
voido
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jailbait View Post
I suggest that you buy various pieces of second hand computer equipment, put them together as a working system, and then install Linux on your home made system. I suggest that you install Fedora. Fedora is the free version of Red Hat which is the Linux distribution you are most likely to run into as a system administrator.

-------------------
Steve Stites
I am currently running Centos on my VM Workstation. The DevOps group at my work uses Centos so I decided to get started with that. I am just uncertain where to go from there or what to do.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 04:59 PM   #5
voido
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Originally Posted by notKlaatu View Post
https://www.edx.org/course/linuxfoun...roduction-1621

Might be a good start; the Linux Foundation is backing that.
thanks for the information, I did some research and found that sight just before I checked these responses. I am going through the start of the course now.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 05:18 PM   #6
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voido View Post
The DevOps group at my work uses Centos so I decided to get started with that. I am just uncertain where to go from there or what to do.
So what does the DevOps group use CentOS for? What infrastructure and services do they require? What I mean is not to "get" the big picture but analyse it, break it up and check each part for services Linux does or could provide. Then you can try and build (part) of it at home. CentOS, when in runlevel 3 and depending on the services it needs to provide, doesn't have excessive memory requirements (still more resources is better always) and getting accustomed to accessed machines via SSH and not some GUI is one of the better ways to get acquainted with it IMO. Once you have build your network have a look at resource and incident monitoring, bottleneck analysis, centralized backups and bare metal restore, failovers, remote colos, unification layers and other resilience-enhancing mechanisms, maybe fake an outage and see what it does, maybe replay some real customers problems and see if you can find the cause. No need for any Shimato Dominguez Off-world Colonies as the fun awaits you right here... :-]
 
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Old 08-06-2014, 04:57 AM   #7
notKlaatu
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I agree with what unSpawn and voido said, and I'd add to it that possibly building a little virtual network (it's trivial to do, especially with docker now), and start building up a sample network environment. Start with the basics; getting the hosts communicating. Then starting adding services. And just build up something that you would build on Windows. You know the typical goals, all you need to do is learn the different ways of doing what you normally do.

Just an idea!

When I was getting started, I read a ton of books on basically anything having to do with Linux. I learned shell commands, networking principles, scripting. It was a bit unfocused, but I had the time and appetite for it. Your mileage may vary, but there are some great books out there that cover all kinds of stuff. The "Linux Bible" series is one of my favourites.
 
Old 08-06-2014, 05:20 AM   #8
EDDY1
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Linux EDX has certification courses but you can audit the courses & take the exams for free.
I'm working on LFS101x & it is a great course.
But you can audit all of the classes that you want.
https://www.edx.org/course/linuxfoun...1#.U-HzVI7FR76

Didn't see this 1 by notKlatoo oops
Quote:
https://www.edx.org/course/linuxfoun...roduction-1621

Might be a good start; the Linux Foundation is backing that.
__________________
http://slackermedia.info

Last edited by EDDY1; 08-06-2014 at 05:23 AM.
 
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Old 08-06-2014, 06:22 AM   #9
chrism01
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You can read all the manuals at www.linuxtopia.org and this is a good cli intro http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
 
  


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