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Old 12-20-2008, 06:09 PM   #31
Theoutdoorsman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyGunFreak View Post
This is probably beginning to go off track for Linux support, I've built PC's for a long time, and have used Asus motherboards for almost all that time (oddly, never that board), and never heard of the voltage issue w/ that board. However, I just googled the manual for that board, and it looks like it has to be either .8v or 1.5v only. Probably switches which you can use, via a jumper... Here's the manual.

http://www.cizgi.com.tr/pdf/p4v8x-x.pdf

Unfortunately most of the specs for AGP cards on TD and Newegg, don't list voltage requirements.

Good luck

IGF
You are correct in the voltage requirements. Off track??? We're talking about compatability issues regarding several distibutions of Linux. I've tried three now, with only one that I can get to work at all. I've found a card that will work (XFX GeForce 6200). I'll give the Ubuntu a go, now, and see what happens with that disto. If this one won't boot, I'll be forced to look into buying the XFX card and get rid of the problem. If you know a work around for this darn ATI card, I'd LOVE to hear it! I'm getting really tired of beating my head against a wall with this thing. Like I mentioned before, I have the linux drivers for the card, but have absolutely NO idea how to install them during the installation process of Mandriva 2008 Spring, or any other distro for that matter. How do I do that? If someone could explain, in detail, how to do this, I sure would appreciate it.
 
Old 12-20-2008, 07:13 PM   #32
IndyGunFreak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theoutdoorsman View Post
You are correct in the voltage requirements. Off track??? We're talking about compatability issues regarding several distibutions of Linux.
Eh, folks here tend to get wired up, you could be talking about your favorite restaurant and it wouldn't bother me.

I I wonder if there's some kind of "minimal" install you can do for Mandriva, then install the ATI drivers from CLI, then install a GUI. I'm really not experienced enough w/ Mandriva to help you much..

IGF
 
Old 12-20-2008, 07:36 PM   #33
thorkelljarl
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A couple of standard links

http://apcmag.com/howto_category.htm?cid=198

http://www.livecdlist.com/

On the list you will find live-cds that will allow to work with partitons and files. Good Luck with linux.
 
Old 12-22-2008, 02:39 PM   #34
Theoutdoorsman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyGunFreak View Post
Eh, folks here tend to get wired up, you could be talking about your favorite restaurant and it wouldn't bother me.

I I wonder if there's some kind of "minimal" install you can do for Mandriva, then install the ATI drivers from CLI, then install a GUI. I'm really not experienced enough w/ Mandriva to help you much..

IGF

Well, I ditched the ATI card troubles for now and installed Ubuntu on my test machine with an Nvidia card. I must say........ I'm impressed. To my disbelief, Ubuntu not only installed and booted, it picked up ALL my usb peripherals with NO problems. The firefox web browser is also my second choice of browsers via Windows as well. So that just fit like a glove. Although Mandrake has a LOT more optional packages, this distribution is quite fitting. I like it. I think I'll stick with this one for a while!!! I do have one question before I hang this thread up though. My "better half" likes one particular game in Mandrake 10.1. Is it possible to incorporate that game into this distribution? If possible, how do I do it?
 
Old 12-22-2008, 06:22 PM   #35
jay73
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Quote:
Although Mandrake has a LOT more optional packages
Now this is just not true; it is Ubuntu that has the largest collection of pre-compiled software of all distributions I have ever tried. Need to convince yourself? Check out System > Admin > Synaptic Package Manager: over 25000 packages ready for download.
 
Old 12-22-2008, 07:34 PM   #36
IndyGunFreak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theoutdoorsman View Post
Well, I ditched the ATI card troubles for now and installed Ubuntu on my test machine with an Nvidia card. I must say........ I'm impressed. To my disbelief, Ubuntu not only installed and booted, it picked up ALL my usb peripherals with NO problems. The firefox web browser is also my second choice of browsers via Windows as well. So that just fit like a glove. Although Mandrake has a LOT more optional packages, this distribution is quite fitting. I like it. I think I'll stick with this one for a while!!! I do have one question before I hang this thread up though. My "better half" likes one particular game in Mandrake 10.1. Is it possible to incorporate that game into this distribution? If possible, how do I do it?
What game is it?.. It might be in the repositories of Ubuntu. Ubuntu is probably the most widely supported distribution there is, so you should have no problems finding help when you need it..

Good luck

IGF
 
Old 12-23-2008, 03:21 AM   #37
dchmelik
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For records mySQL or PostgreSQL are excellent, but you might want to find an interface. There are that may have separate interfaces, such as the Berekely db system.

As for GNU/Linux distros (distributions,) do you want one to install easier than Windows, login easier, or run easier, etc.? Perhaps people already mentioned some that do all that or more. Most only do one or a few of those things.

I know only one that does all that, which you probably would not like by your definition of 'basic everyday stuff:' Slackware (or derived: Slamd64....)

To me it is moderately easy to run, i.e. harder than Windows for most other people, but it is easier to install and login than most OSes. It is one of those that can take the least install time: you can choose all software, or a few groups of it, which is a decent amount and may take 15 - 60 minutes to copy (while taking a break,) then you answer a few setup questions. Maybe few people know that, because more use GNU/Linux distros (distributions) that may still require you to choose from a list of many hundreds of individual software packages. Slackware-based distros are the only I know do not force account passwords, which may only be a hassle for home systems running no server software (even if you would, you must make a password to remote login as root.)

Some people recommended Redhat's distros. and Suse, which to me using and maybe installing a few years ago seemed 'nice' in labs that had many of one computer type. About 1997 - '8 I bought 3 distro CDs from a Linux store: only Redhat did not boot. Later I downloaded 2 or a few Redhat distros and checked the md5sums (the copies were not broken.) Most ran but could never install/finish. One I remember trying is a basic version I immediately tried to upgrade to enterprise version with using instructions that failed. My friend who introduced me to PCs briefly used CentOS (a copy of Redhat enterprise.) Redhat-based distros certainly improved, but a few people say they are too hard compared to how easy they are called. The Redhat I saw a couple years ago used (maybe defaulted to) some version of Gnome (a GUI: like Windows or Mac.)
Last time I read documentation, Gnome had to be configured using only text files. I guess one could have downloaded KDE.

Suse probably has the most software; maybe it lets you choose 'all' or a few groups. When I tried Redhat it allowed that, relatively, because it had a medium amount of software (Slackware may only have a little more than considered necessary.)

Many people recommended Debian or derivatives such as Ubuntu. I used Debian about 1998 - '02: eventually it took almost a day to choose what to install and make sure choices did not conflict. Unless that changed, Slamd64 would be much easier unless you do not install as much as programmers do in Debian, but its installation interface was (or is) harder. Debian's ideas may be closer to that of FSF, or at least Gnewsense is (Debian-based, I think,) which FSF recommends. However, Slackware (32-bit) has been developed longest of all.

Mandrake, Xandros, etc., are rather new & unknown to me, and so is Gentoo, which I am surprised no one mentioned. Three years ago it seemed easier than the last Debian I tried. Gentoo may be stabler than Slamd64, but IMO, not as easy.

Probably someone mentioned one as easy to install as Windows, except Windows installation is time-consuming. Surely someone mentioned some as easy to run as Windows, except earlier Windows had no logins (it just started,) and if you want a POSIX (Unix, GNU/Linux, etc.) that way besides Slackware you may have to program it yourself. You could get help, so that would be easier. Maybe try a few that have a better installation interface than Slackware and Redhat, which actually have the best text installation interfaces. Maybe the one in Redhat is graphical now, and maybe it, Suse, or most of the above (probably not Debian) also ask if you want to automatically run the X Window System. Of course, that is easy to set up. I suspect several others like this have not been mentioned.

Hopefully I gave a couple ideas of what may be suitable or what to watch out for, but likely some more discussions would help from people who know have experience of what might be suitable in Windows since ME & 2000.
 
Old 12-23-2008, 12:13 PM   #38
Theoutdoorsman
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For anyone who might be having problems installing Linux on their machine, I learned something that might be of use to others. I am running an ASUS P4V8X-X motherboard with an ATI 9800 Pro (9500 Pro) video card. After trying to install various distributions of Linux, with multiple failures, I finally read during the installation of Ubuntu that disabling ACPI support within the BIOS, on motherboards sporting a VIA chipset, might be necessary. I entered my BIOS, disabled ACPI support, and viola!!! I can now install these distrobutions with no problems whatsoever!!! I now have Mandriva 2008 Spring up an running!!! Daddy like!!! Thanks for sticking with me on the problems I was having guys/gals!!! Your time was much appreciated!!! I'm sure I'll have many more questions. So I'll lay this thread to rest and start enjoying my computer for a while. Thanks again!!!
 
Old 12-23-2008, 07:29 PM   #39
IndyGunFreak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theoutdoorsman View Post
For anyone who might be having problems installing Linux on their machine, I learned something that might be of use to others. I am running an ASUS P4V8X-X motherboard with an ATI 9800 Pro (9500 Pro) video card. After trying to install various distributions of Linux, with multiple failures, I finally read during the installation of Ubuntu that disabling ACPI support within the BIOS, on motherboards sporting a VIA chipset, might be necessary. I entered my BIOS, disabled ACPI support, and viola!!! I can now install these distrobutions with no problems whatsoever!!! I now have Mandriva 2008 Spring up an running!!! Daddy like!!! Thanks for sticking with me on the problems I was having guys/gals!!! Your time was much appreciated!!! I'm sure I'll have many more questions. So I'll lay this thread to rest and start enjoying my computer for a while. Thanks again!!!
You know, I didn't even think of disabling ACPI...

Good going.... glad you've got what you want.

IGF
 
  


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