LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-20-2010, 01:16 AM   #1
anotherlinuxnewb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Posts: 12

Rep: Reputation: 0
Need help choosing Linux approach


I am considering several approaches to integrating Linux into my PC, but I'm mainly going to be using it to surf the web. I just ordered the Acer Aspire AS5740G-6979 and this is my first time returning to a PC after a crash in 2008 left me permanently disgruntled with Windows. Despite using NOD32 Virus Scanner, I got a virus and crashed... now I have a Mac Mini... I digress.

So now I need a PC for my work and want to surf the web using Linux as a sort of proxy to protect my machine from spyware and viruses. Which of the following approaches to you recommend:

1) Partition my HD and install Windows and Linux
2) Use a Flash Drive to boot Linux
3) Run Linux from within Windows

So what do you think the best and most secure approach is? And which version of Linux do you recommend? Can you boot Ubuntu from a Memory Stick?
 
Old 04-20-2010, 01:34 AM   #2
EricTRA
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295
Hello and welcome to LinuxQuestions,

If I were you I'd just forget about Windoze That's about the most secure way you can get. If you really need Winblows then you can easily create a dualboot any way you want: create partitions first and install to dedicated partition; install Win first and next Linux, ...

Of course you can install Window$ on your HD and run Linux from a USB stick, whatever you prefer. Most Live version of distros can easily be installed onto such a USB drive. I personally have Knoppix 6.3 installed on a 32Gb USB stick with 4Gb protected data storage and it runs great. Ubuntu can also be installed onto a memory stick as far as I know, so pick your choice.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 04-20-2010, 01:37 AM   #3
anotherlinuxnewb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Lol.. trust me I would love to forget about Windows, but it's a necessary evil, as I need it to run Neurofeedback software.

I'll look into Knoppix... I have no idea the difference between that and Ubuntu. Have you ever tried running Linux within Windows? I am pretty sure I know the answer to that already

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTRA View Post
Hello and welcome to LinuxQuestions,

If I were you I'd just forget about Windoze That's about the most secure way you can get. If you really need Winblows then you can easily create a dualboot any way you want: create partitions first and install to dedicated partition; install Win first and next Linux, ...

Of course you can install Window$ on your HD and run Linux from a USB stick, whatever you prefer. Most Live version of distros can easily be installed onto such a USB drive. I personally have Knoppix 6.3 installed on a 32Gb USB stick with 4Gb protected data storage and it runs great. Ubuntu can also be installed onto a memory stick as far as I know, so pick your choice.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 04-20-2010, 01:39 AM   #4
cola
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: Dhaka,Bangladesh
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,031

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherlinuxnewb View Post
I am considering several approaches to integrating Linux into my PC, but I'm mainly going to be using it to surf the web. I just ordered the Acer Aspire AS5740G-6979 and this is my first time returning to a PC after a crash in 2008 left me permanently disgruntled with Windows. Despite using NOD32 Virus Scanner, I got a virus and crashed... now I have a Mac Mini... I digress.

So now I need a PC for my work and want to surf the web using Linux as a sort of proxy to protect my machine from spyware and viruses. Which of the following approaches to you recommend:

1) Partition my HD and install Windows and Linux
2) Use a Flash Drive to boot Linux
3) Run Linux from within Windows

So what do you think the best and most secure approach is? And which version of Linux do you recommend? Can you boot Ubuntu from a Memory Stick?
Welcome to LQ forum.
You can choose ubuntu.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 01:45 AM   #5
EricTRA
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherlinuxnewb View Post
Lol.. trust me I would love to forget about Windows, but it's a necessary evil, as I need it to run Neurofeedback software.

I'll look into Knoppix... I have no idea the difference between that and Ubuntu. Have you ever tried running Linux within Windows? I am pretty sure I know the answer to that already
Hi,

I understand completely, I'm fighting WinWorld here at the office also, already have migrated 20 of the 60 servers from Windhoos to Linux. So still a long way to go until I reach the workstations

And yes, I ran Ubuntu from within Windows. Although it's a great way to discover Ubuntu without making changes to your Windoze installation, it wasn't for me.

Knoppix and Ubuntu are both Debian based, Ubuntu in my opinion being more for the 'new' user, lot of stuff automated and Knoppix being more for the professional Linux user.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 04-20-2010, 02:00 AM   #6
anotherlinuxnewb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
It's funny... even though Ubuntu is for the new user, I remember when I used it a couple years back I wanted to install a particular software package. Well, I kept getting errors installing it, and finally figured out that I had to modify a certain text file in order to insert a PGP key just so I could install a normal piece of software. Seemed way overly complex... quite a headache lol. So I'll stick with the Linux for new users... ain't no shame in that
 
Old 04-20-2010, 02:03 AM   #7
anotherlinuxnewb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Creating a shared directory...

So I'm going to install Ubuntu KDE onto a flash drive now... but is there a way to designate a common directory on the PC hard drive that Linux can read and write to for sharing files?
 
Old 04-20-2010, 02:16 AM   #8
EricTRA
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295
Hello,

No shame at all in learning, I learn something new everyday. If you're going with the latest Ubuntu, then I think (not sure though, so check) that you have the right tools already installed so that you can just double click on your HD to mount it and read/write to it.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 04-20-2010, 02:16 AM   #9
cola
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: Dhaka,Bangladesh
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,031

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherlinuxnewb View Post
So I'm going to install Ubuntu KDE onto a flash drive now... but is there a way to designate a common directory on the PC hard drive that Linux can read and write to for sharing files?
Ubuntu is for gnome,kubuntu is with kde.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 02:18 AM   #10
EricTRA
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295
Quote:
Originally Posted by cola View Post
Ubuntu is for gnome,kubuntu is with kde.
Not necessarily, you can easily install KDE onto Ubuntu and switch desktop environment. Kubuntu just comes with KDE pre-installed and configured whereas Ubuntu, as you stated, comes with Gnome. But like with almost anything in Linux, YOU have the choice

Kind regards,
 
Old 04-20-2010, 03:46 AM   #11
tommyttt
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Location: Federal Way, WA
Distribution: openSUSE 11.4 x86_64, openSuSE 12.1, Fedora 15
Posts: 207

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherlinuxnewb View Post
I am considering several approaches to integrating Linux into my PC, but I'm mainly going to be using it to surf the web. I just ordered the Acer Aspire AS5740G-6979 and this is my first time returning to a PC after a crash in 2008 left me permanently disgruntled with Windows. Despite using NOD32 Virus Scanner, I got a virus and crashed... now I have a Mac Mini... I digress.

So now I need a PC for my work and want to surf the web using Linux as a sort of proxy to protect my machine from spyware and viruses. Which of the following approaches to you recommend:

1) Partition my HD and install Windows and Linux
2) Use a Flash Drive to boot Linux
3) Run Linux from within Windows

So what do you think the best and most secure approach is? And which version of Linux do you recommend? Can you boot Ubuntu from a Memory Stick?
My perspective would be to shy away from running any linux distro under windows. It has some problems allowing access to some of the hardware.

Can't recommend a distro for you since I only run openSuSE and freeBSD.

I assume the computer you're getting comes with windows, probably win7 if it's new. Couple of things to be aware of - most new systems with windows pre-installed don't give you a rescue/re-install DVD, they would rather waste HD space with a hidden partition containing it to save a few pennies. Demand a DVD from Acer as required by US law. That way if something happens to the MBR/partition table you can restore.

Also, installing linux (anything other than windows) may void the warranty. If you need to get it repaired for any reason, re-install fully with windows before sending it in.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 08:51 AM   #12
hda7
Member
 
Registered: May 2009
Distribution: Debian wheezy
Posts: 251

Rep: Reputation: 31
Take a look at Puppy Linux. It's a lightweight distro that is (at least supposed to be) friendly to new Linux users.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 09:14 AM   #13
xxmasrawy
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherlinuxnewb View Post
1) Partition my HD and install Windows and Linux
2) Use a Flash Drive to boot Linux
3) Run Linux from within Windows
i think you will find fedora 12 suitable for this usage
 
Old 04-20-2010, 09:55 AM   #14
cola
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: Dhaka,Bangladesh
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,031

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTRA View Post
Not necessarily, you can easily install KDE onto Ubuntu and switch desktop environment. Kubuntu just comes with KDE pre-installed and configured whereas Ubuntu, as you stated, comes with Gnome. But like with almost anything in Linux, YOU have the choice

Kind regards,
I know kde can be installed on Ubuntu and vice versa.
It was not clear from the original poster's post.
From OP:
Code:
So I'm going to install Ubuntu KDE onto a flash drive now...
 
Old 04-20-2010, 11:22 AM   #15
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720
I actually don't like Ubuntu, I'd recommend something like Fedora.

Anyway, I would recommend you try whatever Linux distro you choose in a virtual machine under Windows, and if you really like it, install it.

And then install Windows in a virtual machine under Linux if you need it. And AFAIK if you use VirtualBox, you can integrate Windows windows into the Linux desktop.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Simple Approach to Linux Wireless LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 07-18-2008 05:40 AM
Linux commands, tools a first practical approach manolakis Linux - Newbie 2 11-08-2006 11:39 PM
Looking for a Linux distro with EASY approach to installing programs Cinematography Linux - Distributions 26 06-29-2005 02:14 PM
Best approach to learning Linux vharishankar General 15 11-09-2004 02:29 AM
An interesting newbie approach to Linux Punkie Linux - Newbie 14 07-22-2003 01:44 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:44 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration