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Old 07-14-2013, 05:54 PM   #1
helpmesos
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Question need help!!!!!


Please help me, some how I have locked myself out of my computer, I deleted all the profiles and now my computer wont let me log in all it keeps saying is login failed. Please help me I don't know anything about Linux my son won this computer from school and we are use to using windows
 
Old 07-14-2013, 05:59 PM   #2
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helpmesos View Post
Please help me, some how I have locked myself out of my computer, I deleted all the profiles and now my computer wont let me log in all it keeps saying is login failed. Please help me I don't know anything about Linux my son won this computer from school and we are use to using windows
We will be glad to help you, but you have to provide details. Also, please see the "How to ask a Smart Question" guidelines.

We need to know what kind of computer, what version/distro of Linux it's running and how you deleted profiles when you say you were locked out of it. (???) Unless you provide details and tell us exactly what's going on, we can't help. A good analogy would be calling an auto-mechanic and saying "my car is making a funny noise! Help!" versus "Whenever I start my Ford F150 truck w/V8 engine, I hear a high-pitched squeal when I step on the gas". One gives the mechanic something to work with...the other doesn't.
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:00 PM   #3
rbees
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We need more info, like what distro is it using?

Can you boot to single user mode?
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:11 PM   #4
helpmesos
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At first I was logged in, I went to user accounts and deleted all the users to make a new user. I typed in the info it wanted like a username and a password. I logged off and went to login and all it kept saying is login failed. I believe that the type of Linux is Linux at lions-HP-Compaq-dc7100-CMT-DX4. My son won it from school. I don't know how to boot to single user mode.
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:33 PM   #5
itsgregman
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When you attempt to start your system what bootloader does it use?

Does it look like a normal win startup or do you get a screen that says "Lilo or Grub" at the beginning?

Which bootloader you have would be a good start on your problem.
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:52 PM   #6
helpmesos
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helpme

How do I find out what boot loader I'm using?
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:55 PM   #7
rbees
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reboot the machine
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:59 PM   #8
yancek
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Most Linux systems I have used will show its name on the screen when you initially boot it. Some common names are ubuntu, mint, fedora, opensuse, etc. there are hundreds of them which is why it is important that you obtain that information.

Seems a little odd that there would be a number of users on a computer like that, something won at school. Seems to be you did this backward. Wouldn't you think it would be wiser to have created a new user first then try to login and see if it worked before deleting the other users, particularly if you could boot with one of the earlier users. Have you tried logging in as one of the previous users? Have you tried rebooting and logging in?
 
Old 07-14-2013, 07:37 PM   #9
snowpine
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Welcome to the forums!

If you've inherited a computer with a bunch of old user accounts, who knows what is on there? Have you considered simply wiping the hard drive and doing a fresh install of your favorite operating system, Windows or Linux? There may be a Linux Users Group (LUG) in your area that can help you do this.
 
Old 07-14-2013, 09:30 PM   #10
John VV
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there are many ways to get help
this forum here , and we DO like to help

The public Library in your city might have a LUG that meats there
or a local community collage might
or
even a local computer repair store can offer help

try a google search for " lug YourCityName "

it sounds like snowpine's guess is likely
this is some OLD operating system on the machine that had a bunch of old users still listed

also you can try installing a NEW operating system
Warning:
however you will LOSE all the data and files on this machine

if you go this route


we can help in guiding you in a selection
but we will need to know some hardware specs


in most cases you will need the install cd or dvd for the operating system that IS installed
from that you can fix that OS ( Operating System )

if the machine is fairly new then
Linux Mint
http://www.linuxmint.com/
might install

Last edited by John VV; 07-14-2013 at 09:34 PM.
 
Old 07-14-2013, 09:43 PM   #11
itsgregman
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Your bootloader should appear right after the manufacturer logo screen. It will say something like starting Lilo or Starting Grub then it will go on to the login screen where your select you user.

It may be easier and more useful for you as the existing system, as you said had many previous users, to simply install a new version of Linux. With the old pentium 4 processor on that system you might want to stay away from any with Gnome or Kde as desktops as they're both a little resource heavy. Look for something with Xfce or Lxde.

I would recommend something like Linux Mint for Xfce or PcLinux for Lxde. Those are both distros aimed at new Linux users and will be easy to configure and use.

The big question about your system is how much Ram is installed as to what your options are when choosing a distro.

Distrowatch gives a good listing of your options

http://distrowatch.com/

With a working computer simply browse, choose one you'd like to try and download the ISO, bring up your CD/DVD Burner and choose burn image or burn iso whichever option your burner gives you. As most versions of Linux use a live cd format you can download and try as many as you like before deciding which you want to install, or as a previous poster suggested you could even put Windows back on it but your system could only run Winxp which will only be supported by MS until 2014.

Last edited by itsgregman; 07-15-2013 at 03:04 PM.
 
Old 07-14-2013, 11:00 PM   #12
Inkit
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I would second the option to reinstall a more current version of linux. Going by what you say, you won't have too much data on the system to worry about. This means that you can basically wipe out the entire drive and install whatever you want. Ubuntu and Linux Mint are considered the most user friendly distributions currently and if you like the classic windows format, I'd suggest you go with the xfce or the KDE version instead of the Gnome one.
Also do a little reading up on unetboot. It allows you to download any one of a number of linux distributions and install it as a bootable live cd on to your pendrive. Once this is done all you have to do is change the boot sequence in the bios (this is usually done by hitting F2 on intel motherboards) booting from your pendrive. In fact if you do this you have the option of trying out a number of different versions before you actually install something on to your system.
It may seem like a lot of work, but it actually isn't.
 
Old 07-15-2013, 03:02 PM   #13
itsgregman
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As the OP's system is a Pentium 4, and around a decade old he probably won't be able to boot from a USB drive on that system. From what he posted I assume his son won a retired school computer that someone installed Linux on to extend its useful life.

As I stated before, not knowing how much ram is present in his system makes it hard to give him a recommendation for a replacement distro, but with a Pentium 4 he should probably try and stay with one of the lighter Desktop Environments.

If the OP prefers to save the installed system for some reason, knowing the installed distro would probably be a good start.
 
Old 07-16-2013, 05:43 AM   #14
Inkit
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Quote:
As the OP's system is a Pentium 4, and around a decade old he probably won't be able to boot from a USB drive on that system
not necessarily. I have a "more than a decade old" computer with a pentium 4 processor and 512 mb of ram and mint runs quite well on it. Granted it's a bit slow, but the point is that I can boot up and install from a usb drive and that I am able to have a fully functional system. In any case, we wouldn't know if the bios supports this feature till we try it out.

To the op,
It really doesn't matter whether your comp supports booting from a USB or not. If it doesn't then you haven't lost anything. Just write the iso on to a disc and boot from it. It's all the same, one method is just faster than the other.
And if this is the route you want to take, just go with ubuntu or mint. It's not a question of whether you get it right the first time or not. I am assuming that you want this to be a learning experience for your son, and anything you do adds to his experience. Many times he learns more from what doesn't go right than from what does. So just plunge in. What do you have to lose?
 
Old 07-16-2013, 08:18 AM   #15
Gonzalo_VC
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Lightbulb Let's see...

Quote:
Originally Posted by helpmesos View Post
Please help me, some how I have locked myself out of my computer, I deleted all the profiles and now my computer wont let me log in all it keeps saying is login failed. Please help me I don't know anything about Linux my son won this computer from school and we are use to using windows
My friend,
First of all: calm down Let's see if we can help from here. Please, see that is not the easiest way if you are completely new to GNU/Linux or ANY OTHER operating system and if we are helping through a forum. HOWEVER some things can be done
As other friends here said, we need to know a couple of things, like the version of Linux you are running (when you boot, some logo or name must appear, and version number).
Then, if there is some user, it can be found with a command that I don't remember right now, but someone else can tell us faster. Knowing the name of the user, you can try to log-in.
Please, remember always that for Linux, capital letters are different from non capital ones. So, "John" is not the same as "john" and you have to type the user name and the password you have entered just as it was created! OK?
We wait for more details.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkit View Post
not necessarily. I have a "more than a decade old" computer with a pentium 4 processor and 512 mb of ram and mint runs quite well on it. Granted it's a bit slow, but the point is that I can boot up and install from a usb drive and that I am able to have a fully functional system. In any case, we wouldn't know if the bios supports this feature till we try it out.
SURE, that's one of the greatest advantages in GNU/Linux! I'm running SolydX (based on the latest Debian) on 2 computers with Athlon processors (Pentium 4 era) one with 1 GB of slow RAM and the other with 512 MB of RAM. They run fine. And I have MiniNo 2.0 (based on Debian and with LXDE as desktop) running in a Pentium III with 512 MB RAM and this is surelly slower, but works. So this guy's machine would be fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkit View Post
To the op,
It really doesn't matter whether your comp supports booting from a USB or not. If it doesn't then you haven't lost anything. Just write the iso on to a disc and boot from it. It's all the same, one method is just faster than the other.
And if this is the route you want to take, just go with ubuntu or mint. It's not a question of whether you get it right the first time or not. I am assuming that you want this to be a learning experience for your son, and anything you do adds to his experience. Many times he learns more from what doesn't go right than from what does. So just plunge in. What do you have to lose?
That is right. With ANY GNU/Linux distribution live CD or DVD you can boot that computer, search in the file manager (Dolphin, Nautilus, Thunnar, PCManFM, etc.) you may find that hard drive as hda1 or something like that, click on it (it will be "mounted" or made available), search for the folder named /home, and inside you will find other folders from any users they might have (john, dad, son, mom, peter...). Inside of those, all the files that can be copied to a pen-drive, or send by e-mail to yourself.
After that, you can stop and think what to do with the computer (format it and install a brand new Linux from zero, arranging your partitions and creating the correct users, etc.

Just one more thing, helpmesos: there are ways to log-in and reset the users password, but I am no system administrator to know how. But some wise guys out there know it. They can fix your password mistake, OK?

Last edited by Gonzalo_VC; 07-17-2013 at 09:00 AM. Reason: (adding one more answer, without duplicating posts)
 
  


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