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Old 06-10-2014, 08:52 PM   #16
ymf331
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Well I think that Windows has been around longer, and stability largely depends on the maintainers of your distribution of choice. To me, it seems like your better judgement comes into play more often but it's unlikely that someone tailor-made you a virus. Hi. Never tried that distro though.
 
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Old 06-11-2014, 09:57 AM   #17
jailbait
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyb View Post
arnyb says:

I had not given that aspect much thought. I am using an "old" computer, though the processor is a newer one. I think I'm using a P4 (or equivalent) w/768 MB (RAM) with on-board cache memory (no certain of how much here). It seems slow, but I am not the techie type, so ... I might be wrong.
Can anyone offer any thoughts on this aspect. I am told that older processors, and older machine tend to run slower, and one advantage of specific versions of Linux is that on a "older machine", this does not tend to be a problem.

Anyone have any thoughts on that ?? Would different distro treat different hardware configurations better or worse - feature wise. This should be something I need to know, any thoughts on this.

Arnyb
The hardware factors that influence the speed that Linux runs are CPU speed, the amount of RAM, and disk access speed. You can't do much with software to speed up the CPU. You can optimize RAM usage by installing a smaller desktop such as XFCE or using smaller applications such as a small editor instead of LibreOffice. You can also optimize RAM usage by installing the smallest kernel possible. The best way to speed up hard drives is to install a SSD. Another way is to install a second hard drive and distribute your programs and data across the two drives so that the two drives run in parallel most of the time. You can speed up seek time on a hard drive by placing the most highly used data in the center of the drive and distributing the rest of the data toward the beginning and end of the drive in decreasing frequency of access.

------------------------
Steve Stites
 
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:20 AM   #18
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How well any distro runs is directly related to the hardware it's running on. I used Zorin Lite for a long time for a specific reason and it was a good distro. While I have some powerful hardware, I actually prefer a "light" distro and I'm a fan of LXDE. I don't need my OS to have rotating cubes or wobbly windows - I just want it to launch applications. I will be the 3rd that mentions Lubuntu and you'll need the 32bit version for your hardware...
 
Old 06-11-2014, 10:32 AM   #19
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On AC I like my desktop windows to shuffle around a lot and explode on the ☒...
http://userbase.kde.org/System_Setti...top_Effects/en
 
Old 06-11-2014, 10:38 AM   #20
NGIB
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My daily driver is a Core I-7 laptop with 8GB RAM, 750 GB drive and a 2GB nvidia video card - and I run LXDE. Looking at XFCE now as it has a tad more "polish"...
 
Old 06-11-2014, 11:01 AM   #21
jamison20000e
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I like both but Openbox, JWM or even lighter are my go tos on DC. I must say tho my GRUB always has more than two options as well.
 
Old 06-11-2014, 06:59 PM   #22
jross
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyb View Post
arnyb says:
That's a good thought.

I had not given that aspect much thought. I am using an "old" computer, though the processor is a newer one. I think I'm using a P4 (or equivalent) w/768 MB (RAM) with on-board cache memory (no certain of how much here). It seems slow, but I am not the techie type, so ... I might be wrong.
Can anyone offer any thoughts on this aspect. I am told that older processors, and older machine tend to run slower, and one advantage of specific versions of Linux is that on a "older machine", this does not tend to be a problem.

Anyone have any thoughts on that ?? Would different distro treat different hardware configurations better or worse - feature wise. This should be something I need to know, any thoughts on this.
Actually, since a lot have mentioned Lubuntu, that is indeed tailored to older and slower machines. Theoretically, it should run quite well with your specs.

Zorin Lite is a respin of Lubuntu. The problem is, as I mentioned, it is based off older versions (I believe 8 is about to expire) and 6 is based off of a 2 year old lubuntu). Same problem with the regular versions of Zorin, which may be too heavy for your machine.

Anyway, You can start off trying a live CD of lubuntu 14.04 and zorin lite to get a feel for what they offer (they both are very windows looking desktop. Do you know how to do that? I just think you should start seeing what these actually feel like since you don't have to install to just try it.

Last edited by jross; 06-11-2014 at 07:03 PM.
 
Old 06-11-2014, 08:25 PM   #23
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyb View Post
arnyb says:
T I am using an "old" computer, though the processor is a newer one. I think I'm using a P4 (or equivalent) w/768 MB (RAM) with on-board cache memory (no certain of how much here). It seems slow, but I am not the techie type, so ... I might be wrong.
Can anyone offer any thoughts on this aspect.
From the Lubuntu.net website, here are the system requirements for the 32bit Lubuntu:
Quote:
A Pentium II or Celeron system with 128 MB of RAM is probably a bottom-line configuration that may yield slow yet usable system with a standard lubuntu desktop.

14.04 32 bit ISO require your CPU to have Physical Address Extensions, or PAE. "PAE is provided by Intel Pentium Pro and above CPUs, including all later Pentium-series processors (except most 400 MHz-bus versions of the Pentium M)." - If you have an error with Celeron M reporting "NON-PAE CPU" and would like to install Lubuntu 14.04, please see this page
For a PC with your specs, you would not benefit from 64bit Lubuntu even if your PC could use it. So just use the 32bit Lubuntu.
As for the install CD requirements, see this:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Lubuntu/Alternate_ISO
Quote:
Installing with graphical interface on low-RAM systems
On the 'Desktop ISO', the graphical installer Ubiquity requires about 700-750 MB of RAM to run. This requirement does not include the RAM required to run the LiveCD (200 MB). So running the graphical installer by using the option 'Try Lubuntu' in the installer requires more RAM than selecting it from the boot menu.
So you may want to use the text based CD to install Lubuntu if you have trouble with the live CD installer. This is not difficult to use. It just involves using the keyboard instead of the mouse. You can get the text based install CD for Lubuntu here:
http://cdimages.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/r...rusty/release/
Choose the PC (Intel x86) alternate install image from that page.
So you should be good to run Lubuntu on your system.
Another thought would be to use Debian 7. The Ubuntu family are all based on Debian, so the configuration and package management are similar. Debian is also very good for older computers despite running a full on Gnome 3 desktop. Lighter desktops like XFCE are also available for Debian. However, Debian is not ideally suited for beginners in my opinion. So perhaps start out with Lubuntu and then consider Debian later once you get a feel for using a Linux distro that is based on Debian.
If you plan on using that PC for a while the performance would benefit quite a bit if you could add another 1GB of memory to your system.

Last edited by tommcd; 06-11-2014 at 08:37 PM.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 06:01 PM   #24
arnyb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jailbait View Post
The hardware factors that influence the speed that Linux runs are CPU speed, the amount of RAM, and disk access speed. You can't do much with software to speed up the CPU.


Quote:
You can optimize RAM usage by installing a smaller desktop such as XFCE or using smaller applications such as a small editor instead of LibreOffice. You can also optimize RAM usage by installing the smallest kernel possible. The best way to speed up hard drives is to install a SSD.

Quote:
Another way is to install a second hard drive and distribute your programs and data across the two drives so that the two drives run in parallel most of the time.
[/QUOTE]



[QUOTE]You can speed up seek time on a hard drive by placing the most highly used data in the center of the drive and distributing the rest of the data toward the beginning and end of the drive in decreasing frequency of access.
Quote:

------------------------
Steve Stites
Thanks for you detailed response. I have intentionally separated it into sections which I consider more manageable.

Before I begin my response, I am hoping that it is permitted to specify Hardware that I have as part of my computer. On some forums, I have heard of folks getting into trouble for doing this. I took a look at the "rules" page, and did not notice anything specifically saying I could not post this kind of content, so .... here goes.

1. I present Hardware is:
  1. Pentium P4
  2. 2.80 GHz
  3. 786 MB of RAM
  4. Single Internal HD
  5. DVD Internal Drive

2. optimize RAM usage:
  1. This is something I had not given a lot of thought to however:
  2. Interesting Idea
  3. I will need some suggestions and/or options here

Other available software:
  1. my present experience is with Open Office 4.0.1.
  2. I was made to understand that Libre Office was is a similar product, an "office Suite" type of product.
  3. As I am looking for this type of product, I had not considered something with a smaller footprint, but this too is a good idea.
  4. So, I need to check out alternate products that will run in a "Linux Environment.

3. I originally had a second hard drive, but it died and was never replaced. This is a $$-related problem, all mine. When you live on a restrictive budget, you learn to not have and make due with what you have.

4. Seek time. This is something I need to learn how to do. It is an interesting thought, something I should be aware of, and learn how to do. Can you recommend any "really good" products, hopefully "open source" and "freeware".

Again thanks for taking a look, responding, if you so wish and for the time and effort a quality response takes to compose. I appreciate the friendship and the time that everyone is devoting to me.

arnyb
 
Old 06-12-2014, 06:57 PM   #25
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyb View Post
Before I begin my response, I am hoping that it is permitted to specify Hardware that I have as part of my computer. On some forums, I have heard of folks getting into trouble for doing this. I took a look at the "rules" page, and did not notice anything specifically saying I could not post this kind of content, so .... here goes.
Thanks for checking the rules first. As far as I've seen, it is acceptable to post your hardware, and most (if not all) times people need your hardware info to give a helpful suggestion or to aid in debugging.

With those specs, you should be able to make do with Lubuntu. It probably won't be very fast, but it should definitely be a useable OS. Just don't expect every click to have an immediate response . Once you get a feel of how Linux works, however, I would recommend that you start looking elsewhere, as there are lots of options that are more lightweight, and will therefore run faster on older hardware. You may want to look into losing the desktop environment and sticking with a basic window manager instead. It definitely won't be full of eye-candy, but it will definitely be able to get the job done.

Hope this helps!

EDIT: It might not be a good idea to publicly post your e-mail in your signature...

Last edited by maples; 06-12-2014 at 06:59 PM.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 07:41 PM   #26
jross
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Quote:

1. I present Hardware is:
  1. Pentium P4
  2. 2.80 GHz
  3. 786 MB of RAM
  4. Single Internal HD
  5. DVD Internal Drive

my present experience is with Open Office 4.0.1. I was made to understand that Libre Office was is a similar product, an "office Suite" type of product.[*]As I am looking for this type of product, I had not considered something with a smaller footprint, but this too is a good idea.
The only real difference between my specs and yours is that I have 1 GIG ram. And I can run Xubuntu 14.04 just fine (that's the "next step up" from Lubuntu, so to speak). I think Lubuntu would most likely work very well for you. In fact, it will most likely be much faster than XP (that's my experience!). All that other stuff about optimizing RAM etc. really I think only was presented to you since it wasn't clear how low your specs were. But knowing what you got, I wouldn't even worry about any of that stuff, it is way beyond what you should be even worrying about at this time as a newbie.

Lubuntu comes with Abiword, which is a lighter weight word processor than Libre. However, Libre Office is available in the ubuntu software center and you can easily install it for free in Lubuntu if you really need a more robust office suite.

Now that your specs are known, I think you are *really* overthinking this It's time to just try this and see if you like it. Again, you can do a trial with a live Cd before actually installing it. Do you know how to do that?

Last edited by jross; 06-13-2014 at 02:16 AM.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 05:15 PM   #27
arnyb
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Question

arnyb replied:
As I have done before, I am dividing the quoted initial response into blocks, and posting a paragraph about each.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jross View Post
The only real difference between my specs and yours is that I have 1 GIG ram. And I can run Xubuntu 14.04 just fine (that's the "next step up" from Lubuntu, so to speak). I think Lubuntu would most likely work very well for you. In fact, it will most likely be much faster than XP (that's my experience!). All that other stuff about optimizing RAM etc. really I think only was presented to you since it wasn't clear how low your specs were. But knowing what you got, I wouldn't even worry about any of that stuff, it is way beyond what you should be even worrying about at this time as a newbie.
1. okay, so my hardward and memory look workable to the members that have replied.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgoss View Post
Lubuntu comes with Abiword, which is a lighter weight word processor than Libre. However, Libre Office is available in the ubuntu software center and you can easily install it for free in Lubuntu if you really need a more robust office suite.
2. Abiword is "new to me. I will take a look at their site, and see what it is all about -- meaning what features it comes with:
  1. I like a spell checking function.
  2. Does it integrate with other programs, meaning a spreadsheet, or some other ones.
  3. Is it part of a package, or a single program.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jross View Post
Now that your specs are known, I think you are *really* over thinking this It's time to just try this and see if you like it. Again, you can do a trial with a live Cd before actually installing it. Do you know how to do that?
3. I have never used the CD Drive for much except to read a book. I have never recorded anything, be it a movie, software download or other stuff. I would be open to any assistance you can offer on this.

I have a new thought, something I have read on other posts, and this is to be certain that whichever distro I finally decide upon, I need to make certain it is stable. As the "newer" beta software is usually not thoroughly tested, I know to steer clear of this type of product. I am wondering if anyone has encountered problems with the distro's shown here ?

Thanks for everyone who read and replied. Your knowledge, assistance and advice are both welcome and appreciated.

arnyb
 
Old 06-16-2014, 02:39 AM   #28
jross
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I'm not sure you understand that with linux, you can download a free version and then make a CD, DVD, or usb drive. You then put the CD in and boot off of it and can then "try" the linux distro before installing it; this does not affect your computer in any way, so it won't hurt or change anything. It will be a trial to see what it actually looks and feels like, but will be slower since it is running off of a CD, so you just factor that in.

Also, if you do decide to install linux, you can (assuming your HD is large enough) keep your Windows XP and install linux along side it in what is called a "dual boot." This means when you turn on your computer you will be given the option of which one you want to boot into. So, it's less risky that way if you are skiddish about losing the windows while you learn the linux.

I found this youtube video of a guy showing installing lubuntu 14.04 and you might want to check it out to see what it will look like. I'm not saying this guy is any expert - only that you can get an idea and he also describes how his mother was easily able to use it. http://youtu.be/f9Z71mc4ojA

The first thing you will need to do is go to http://lubuntu.net/ and download the 32 bit version. This is just a normal downlowd using your browser and click download. After, you save that, there are many here who can walk you through the process of burning it to a CD (luckilly lubuntu still fits on a CD) so you can get your feet wet and try it.

I can assure you no one here would ever recommend a beta version to a newbie!
 
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Old 06-18-2014, 12:40 AM   #29
Fisherjfmzc
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this is a nice thread sharing ideas, learn from one another, just a simple reminder those who want a live chat maybe chick this chatwing....
 
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Old 06-18-2014, 12:46 AM   #30
jamison20000e
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I won't call this spam,,, it's on Android right although after checking your other link? Ditch the 7 and we'll talk.

Last edited by jamison20000e; 06-20-2014 at 09:07 PM.
 
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