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Old 01-22-2006, 08:30 PM   #1
ThorCollard
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Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 9

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Thumbs up My experience installing SUSE 10.0 dual-boot


These are my (successful) experiences installing
SUSE Linux 10.0 dual-boot.

My system has (and still had) a 160GB drive containing
Windows XP. The drive was set up (by the manufacturer, and
I never changed it) with one giant partition.

My initial plan was to resize the Windows partition and
put SUSE Linux in mew partitions on that drive. I ran
into trouble, as the SUSE Linux install would not let
me resize that partition. I had defragged the disk, but
when I ran Norton Speeddisk - it showed some Unmovable files
on very high cylinders on the disk. I never found out
for sure if this is the Windows swap file or some stupid
Norton thing or how to move it. Anyway, I had also thought
of getting a second disk and installing SUSE on that as a
safer option, so I now decided to do so.

I did so. I bought a 250GB SATA drive. I installed
the drive in the case and booted with the SUSE Linux
DVD in the DVD drive. The installer came up fine, and
it found my hard drive and allowed me to partition it.

I chose to partition it in this way (keep in mind I don't
know if this is a GOOD way, it is the way I chose based on
what I read here and elsewhere online - comments welcome):

Size Mount Point File System Comment
P 100M /boot ext3 I don't know why I chose
ext3, but did not see the
need for the overhead of
Reiser journalling (though I
don't knoow much about that
either).
P 80G none FAT For later use.
P 40G none FAT For later use.
P 4G swap Linux Swap I have 2G memory
L 10G / Reiser
L 40G /usr Reiser
L 60G /home Reiser

P=Primary, L=Logical

One thing I ran into while partitioning was how to designate the
swap partition. First I just put 'swap' in the mount point, but
that failed on install. Then I saw that you had to put 'Linux Swap'
as the file system type.

I installed everything except for Laptop and Mobile Computing.

Linux recognized my modem (I live in the sticks - dialup and
satellite are the only options here). I have not yet been able
to configure my printer (a cheapo Canon i450 - not on the list
presented, so I just aborted, will try later), or my scanner
(haven't even tried the scanner yet).

I wanted to get right to see if I could dual-boot. I had
selected GRUB as my bootloader and put it on the MBR (Master
Boot Record) of the new SATA drive.

I changed my BIOS to boot from the SATA drive.

First, I rebooted, and selected 'Windows' from the menu
This hung after providing the useful message:
chainloader (hd1,0)+1

I *was* able to make a mountpoint /windows/c and mount the
other drive and see the files:
linux:/boot/grub # mount /dev/hda1 /windows/c

I also was able to go change my BIOS and boot Windows, but of
course didn't want to do that every time.

I investigated this on the net. There are many threads about
chainloader on this site and others, but none fixed my problem
that I found. I did find the /boot/grub directory and the
menu.lst and device.map files.

My device.map file looked correct:
linux:/boot/grub # cat device.map
(fd0) /dev/fd0
(hd0) /dev/sda
(hd1) /dev/hda

While menu.lst contained:
title Windows
chainloader (hd1,0)+1

I changed this to
root (hd1,0)
chainloader +1

That didn't work, so I tried
rootnoverify (hd1,0)
chainloader +1

No dice.

So, I went back to 'info grub'... and found that Windows
insecurely insists on thinking it is on the first drive.
Poor baby. It had the commands to pretend to Windows that
there is a tooth fairy and it can make-believe it is on
the first drive. So I changed menu.lst to this:
rootnoverify (hd1,0)
map (hd0) (hd1)
map (hd1) (hd0)
chainloader +1
makeactive
boot

as it suggested. I don't know if 'makeactive' and 'boot' are
necessary or what they do, but they in the 'info grub' example.

It worked - I can boot Windows XP or SUSE at will.

Thanks to the suggestions I got here, and hoping this log will
help another VW Beetle get back on the road....


linux:/boot/grub # fdisk -l

Disk /dev/hda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 19457 156288321 7 HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 13 104391 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 14 10457 83891430 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda3 10458 15679 41945715 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda4 15680 30401 118254465 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5 15680 16202 4200966 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda6 16203 17508 10490413+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda7 17509 22730 41945683+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda8 22731 30401 61617276 83 Linux


linux:/boot/grub # mount
/dev/sda6 on / type reiserfs (rw,acl,user_xattr)
proc on /proc type proc (rw)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,mode=0620,gid=5)
/dev/sda1 on /boot type ext3 (rw,acl,user_xattr)
/dev/sda8 on /home type reiserfs (rw,acl,user_xattr)
/dev/sda7 on /usr type reiserfs (rw,acl,user_xattr)
/dev/hda1 on /windows/c type ntfs (rw)
usbfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw)
/dev/fd0 on /media/floppy type subfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,sync,fs=floppyfss,procuid)


-- Thor
 
Old 01-23-2006, 04:09 AM   #2
bigjohn
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Registered: Jun 2002
Location: UK .
Distribution: *buntu (usually Kubuntu)
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Well if you got it booting into the SuSE and Windows, then all power to you Thor.

Personally, you probably didn't need to do the SATA disc thing. Theres a free partitioning tool called "ranish partition manager" which I understand works quite well. I should have thought that you could have downloaded that and used it to repartition the first hard drive.

I no longer have a windows install, but when I did, I used (from a 120 gig disc) about 25 gigs for XP (primary), 1 gig for /boot (a lot for /boot but I didn't really know how much room I'd need - primary), 1.5 gigs of /swap (768 megs of RAM installed - primary), 25 gig's for / (again I didn't know how much room I'd really need, but had read stuff about log files getting pretty damn large - 1st logical) and the rest of the disc for /home (ha! I do tend to download lots of unnecessary crap - 2nd logical).

These days, I have 1 gig, 1.5 gig, 25 gig's and 40 gig's - the rest is unallocated. Using Mandriva 2006, I understand that even if I installed everything on the mirror for my architecture, it would only come to about 10 gigs or so, so the 25 for the / is plenty.

As for your bootloader, it does sometimes seem counter-intuitive, but if you had put it on the first part of the MBR on the first hard drive then it can see all the partitions on all the hard drives. Whereas, as you found out, by putting it onto the second HDD it can't see the windows and you have to use some imaginative solutions to make it work.

If your solution(s) worked, excellent, well done. Yes the fstab type listing you posted does indeed seem complicated to a new user, but if you know whats going on it doesn't matter.

regards

John

p.s. Oh and if you look through the gentoo installation hand book theres a nice, easily understood, part that explains about the various file systems and their pro's/con's that I found helpful - you can then just tailor your system to how you want it, for whatever it is that you do with it.
 
Old 01-23-2006, 08:33 AM   #3
ThorCollard
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Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 9

Original Poster
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Thanks, John -

SUSE 10.0 comes with PartIt, which can repartition the drive. I did
that on a laptop at work, but it was unable to do much with my
home computer. I don't think it could move the 'UnMovable' data
(whatever it is) in my XP partition (my theory).

Also, I intentionally didn't put GRUB in the MBR of the first drive
because I wanted to be SURE I could still boot XP (by just removing
the new disk or changing the BIOS). I had read too many messages of
grief being unable to boot XP. So this seemed the safest.

I am a new Linux user - well actually I used it for a couple years about
10 years ago, but I am not a new Unix user (20 years programming experience). My fstab looks fine to me.
 
Old 01-23-2006, 04:22 PM   #4
bigjohn
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2002
Location: UK .
Distribution: *buntu (usually Kubuntu)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThorCollard
Thanks, John -

SUSE 10.0 comes with PartIt, which can repartition the drive. I did
that on a laptop at work, but it was unable to do much with my
home computer. I don't think it could move the 'UnMovable' data
(whatever it is) in my XP partition (my theory).
I'm not sure but that could easily be connected with the questionable ability of linux distros to write to NTFS partitions - don't quote me on that. Previously, when I still had windows install, I used to do all my partitioning stuff with Partition Magic 8 - the only time I ran into trouble, was when I tried to take some space from my /home to make a FAT32 partition for my mp3's (well FLAC's actually). It seems that because I took the bit from the /home, PM8 decided to make it a linux FAT32 partition, not a windows FAT32 one. Of course, XP didn't like that at all !

Quote:
Also, I intentionally didn't put GRUB in the MBR of the first drive
because I wanted to be SURE I could still boot XP (by just removing
the new disk or changing the BIOS). I had read too many messages of
grief being unable to boot XP. So this seemed the safest.
Ok I can see that - yes I've also seen such posts, but I don't recall seeing one that causes any booting problem "out of the box". I seems that it only occurs when the "proper" newbie, tries something beyond the bootloaders capability, and then tries a "home brew" attempt at fixing it.

Anyway, wheres the problem? I seem to recall that both SuSE and Mandriva offer rescue facilities from the first CD/DVD whereby, you just hit F1 for more options, enter "rescue" and then follow the instructions to re-install the windows bootloader <shrug>.

Quote:
I am a new Linux user - well actually I used it for a couple years about
10 years ago, but I am not a new Unix user (20 years programming experience). My fstab looks fine to me.
Ah! that explains it, not only did your fstab quote look rather, erm, "polished", it explained by what a proper newbie would have posted a barrage of questions.

20 years of Unix experience eh ? Well, if you're anything like the chap from my LUG who has about the same about of Unix time "under his belt", then Linux isn't really going to be a problem is it. The chap from my LUG is also a lapsed Debian developer and runs a local debian mirror - his Unix time, generally translates into not using much in the way of GUI's, he's a "command line monster".

Probably see you around the forums then.

regards

John
 
Old 01-23-2006, 04:34 PM   #5
Tinkster
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Registered: Apr 2002
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Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
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Hey, Thor,

And congrats :} ...

would you mind me moving the thread to Linux-Success-stories?
It would be more suitable there than here since it's not a
question ...


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 01-23-2006, 06:55 PM   #6
ThorCollard
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Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 9

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Sure Tinkster, move it if you like.
I just posted it in case somebody might find something useful in it.
 
  


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