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Old 10-14-2004, 08:32 PM   #1
draknoir42
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Annapolis
Distribution: slackware 10.0
Posts: 7

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mouse problems


Hey i just installed slackware 10.0 which came w/ KDE 3.2. When Im in the Text view I have a square cursor for my mouse. When i type 'startx' KDE starts and the cursor appears in the center of the screen. The cursor then stays there until I move the mouse, at which point the cursor disappears never to return again.... Please help
 
Old 10-14-2004, 08:53 PM   #2
m00t00
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paste your xorg.conf
 
Old 10-15-2004, 03:15 PM   #3
draknoir42
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Annapolis
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Okay, so im logged in the screen says
root@darkstar:~#
What do I do now, im just so new I need to get a primer on basic commands and file editing, and i will post that config script. I just need to get an understanding to the point where i can start to putz around and figure things out on my own, but im not there yet
 
Old 10-15-2004, 05:10 PM   #4
comprookie2000
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Hope this helps; http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/nano-basics-guide.xml you will need to know nano for just about every distro when you don't have x,I like mc the best but if its not installed what good is it,nano most times is there.Welcome and good luck,any more questions,ask away did you run xfree86setup or xorgconfig?
http://www.slackware.at/data/slackwa...lackware-HOWTO

Last edited by comprookie2000; 10-15-2004 at 05:22 PM.
 
Old 10-15-2004, 10:32 PM   #5
draknoir42
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Registered: Oct 2004
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Distribution: slackware 10.0
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i tried to run xfree86config but linux said 'file not found." Is there a particular directory to look for the command in? I think the Slackware setup on the CD did it....i dont know...for my particular video card the regular xFree_SVGA driver is listed as working
 
Old 10-15-2004, 10:35 PM   #6
draknoir42
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Annapolis
Distribution: slackware 10.0
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Okay, I think I know exactly what is happening..... the mouse is somehow behind the KDE GUI in the text console behind it..... weird
 
Old 10-15-2004, 10:54 PM   #7
comprookie2000
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I'm going to force you to read;
6.2 Configuring the X Window System

Configuring X can be a complex task. The reason for this is the vast
numbers of video cards available for the PC architecture, most of which
use different programming interfaces. Luckily, most cards today support
basic video standards known as VESA, and if your card is among them you'll
be able to start X using the "startx" command right out of the box.

If this doesn't work with your card, or if you'd like to take advantage of
the high-performance features of your video card such as hardware
acceleration or 3-D hardware rendering, then you'll need to reconfigure X.

To configure X, you'll need to make an /etc/X11/xorg.conf file. This file
contains lots of details about your video hardware, mouse, and monitor.
It's a very complex configuration file, but fortunately there are several
programs to help create one for you. We'll mention a few of them here:

xfree86setup
------------

This is a simple menu driven frontend that's similar in feel to the
Slackware installer. It simply tells the X server to take a look at the
card, and then set up the best initial configuration file it can make
based on the information it gathers. The generated /etc/X11/xorg.conf
file should be a good starting point for most systems (and should work
without modification).

xorgconfig
----------

This is a text-based X configuration program that's designed for the
advanced system administrator. Here's a sample walkthrough using
xorgconfig. First, start the program:

# xorgconfig

This will present a screenful of information about xorgconfig. To
continue, press enter. xorgconfig will ask you to verify you have set
your PATH correctly. It should be fine, so go ahead and hit enter.

Next, select your mouse from the menu presented. If you don't see your
serial mouse listed, pick the Microsoft protocol -- it's the most common
and will probably work. Next xorgconfig will ask you about using
ChordMiddle and Emulate3Buttons. You'll see these options described in
detail on the screen. Use them if the middle button on your mouse doesn't
work under X, or if your mouse only has two buttons (Emulate3Buttons lets
you simulate the middle button by pressing both buttons simultaneously).
Then, enter the name of your mouse device. The default choice,
/dev/mouse, should work since the link was configured during Slackware
setup. If you're running GPM (the Linux mouse server) in repeater mode,
you can set your mouse type to /dev/gpmdata to have X get information
about the mouse through gpm. In some cases (with busmice especially) this
can work better, but most users shouldn't do this.

xorgconfig will ask you about enabling special key bindings. If you need
this say "y". Most users can say "n" -- enter this if you're not sure.

In the next section you enter the sync range for your monitor. To start
configuring your monitor, press enter. You will see a list of monitor
types -- choose one of them. Be careful not to exceed the specifications
of your monitor. Doing so could damage your hardware. Specify the
vertical sync range for your monitor (you should find this in the manual
for the monitor). xorgconfig will ask you to enter strings to identify
the monitor type in the xorg.conf file. Enter anything you like on these
3 lines (including nothing at all).

Now you have the opportunity to look at the database of video card types.
You'll want to do this, so say "y", and select a card from the list shown.
If you don't see your exact card, try selecting one that uses the same
chipset and it will probably work fine. Then choose an X server. You
should have installed the server recommended for your card, but if not,
you can always go back and install that later. Choose option (5) to use
the X server recommended for your video card's chipset.

Next, tell xorgconfig how much RAM you have on your video card.
xorgconfig will want you to enter some more descriptive text about your
video card. If you like, you can enter descriptions on these three lines.

You'll be asked next about your RAMDAC and clock generator settings. You
may enter them if you know the values, but the X server will probably
successfully probe for these values. The next option is to run X
-probeonly to find the clock settings for the card. You can try this, and
if it works it will speed up X's startup time. If it fails, it's not
usually a big problem. If it causes problems with your card, don't use
it.

You'll then be asked which display resolutions you want to use. Again,
going with the provided defaults should be fine to start with. Later on,
you can edit the /etc/X11/xorg.conf file and rearrange the modes so 1024x768
(or whatever mode you like) is the default.

At this point, the xorgconfig program will ask if you'd like to save the
current configuration file. Answer yes, and the X configuration file is
saved, completing the setup process. You can start X now with the
'startx' command.
 
Old 10-18-2004, 10:38 AM   #8
draknoir42
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Annapolis
Distribution: slackware 10.0
Posts: 7

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Okay thanks I got it working.....
FYI I did read the installation readme, but......

root@wouldntyouliketoknow:/# xfree86setup
-bash: command not found

xorgconfig did the trick though. Thank you all.
 
  


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