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Old 04-26-2011, 06:48 AM   #16
ethanole
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Registered: Mar 2011
Distribution: Gentoo, Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Redhat, Mandrake
Posts: 8

Rep: Reputation: Disabled

at first do a
Code:
su
to get into root account (or equal) - you will need your root account's password what you were asked to type in during the install... ;-)

2.
on debian yum is apt-get, so the command to install ntfs-3g package is:
Code:
apt-get install ntfs-3g
It should collect every additional packages needed for ntfs-3g to work properly. If the ntfs-3g package is already installed you should get some kind of output, that says "Hey, it's already there!"

3.
Once ntfs-3g is installed you should be able to mount the NTFS partition (or drive) with such a command like:
Code:
mkdir /mnt/windows_c #just a new mount point
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdXY /mnt/windows_c #where X=a,b,c... according to your drive order (a is the 0. HDD on the 0. bus at the 0. slot), Y=1,2,3... according to the drive geometry (1 is the first partition on the drive, 2 is the 2nd, and so on...)
If you have IDE and SATA capable mainboard then your drives should be something similar like this:
Code:
IDE0 master = hda (Hard Disk "A") or in your config ad0 (Ata Disk 0)
IDE0 slave  = hdb / ad1
IDE1 master = hdc / ad2
IDE1 slave  = hdd / ad3
SATA 0      = sda (Serial ata Disk "A") / ad4
SATA 1      = sdb / ad5
...
any additional block devices would go into the first available name (like me, I have my DVD on /dev/sdc). Block devices can be a lot of thing: CD, DVD, Tape, USB-stick, cellphone, memory card, etc...

Please notice that /dev has only imaginary "names" called nodes, so a hardware device can have a node called 'a' and it can have 'audio_card_device_AC97' both - it depends on the developers of the distro and of course on the one who installed the box and on the root as well how they name their nodes (as root you can rename nodes freely - of course it WILL ruin up your OS if don't know what you are doing)

4.
according to this table and your post from /dev you have your NTFS volumes (partitions) on ad1s1 and ad4s1, so you have to mount lets say like this:
Code:
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/ad1s1 /mnt/windows_c
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/ad4s1 /mnt/windows_d
(like described here: http://wiki.debian.org/NTFS )
before unmounting them do a sync command (just type sync [ENTER], wait for a while, and you can safely unmount them - anyway I still have bad feelings _writing_ on NTFS volumes from non-windows OS - and sync wirtes...)

hope I could help,
eth
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:55 AM   #17
TobiSGD
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Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethanole View Post
at first do a
Code:
su
to get into root account (or equal) - you will need your root account's password what you were asked to type in during the install... ;-)

2.
on debian yum is apt-get, so the command to install ntfs-3g package is:
Code:
apt-get install ntfs-3g
It should collect every additional packages needed for ntfs-3g to work properly. If the ntfs-3g package is already installed you should get some kind of output, that says "Hey, it's already there!"

3.
Once ntfs-3g is installed you should be able to mount the NTFS partition (or drive) with such a command like:
Code:
mkdir /mnt/windows_c #just a new mount point
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdXY /mnt/windows_c #where X=a,b,c... according to your drive order (a is the 0. HDD on the 0. bus at the 0. slot), Y=1,2,3... according to the drive geometry (1 is the first partition on the drive, 2 is the 2nd, and so on...)
If you have IDE and SATA capable mainboard then your drives should be something similar like this:
Code:
IDE0 master = hda (Hard Disk "A") or in your config ad0 (Ata Disk 0)
IDE0 slave  = hdb / ad1
IDE1 master = hdc / ad2
IDE1 slave  = hdd / ad3
SATA 0      = sda (Serial ata Disk "A") / ad4
SATA 1      = sdb / ad5
...
any additional block devices would go into the first available name (like me, I have my DVD on /dev/sdc). Block devices can be a lot of thing: CD, DVD, Tape, USB-stick, cellphone, memory card, etc...

Please notice that /dev has only imaginary "names" called nodes, so a hardware device can have a node called 'a' and it can have 'audio_card_device_AC97' both - it depends on the developers of the distro and of course on the one who installed the box and on the root as well how they name their nodes (as root you can rename nodes freely - of course it WILL ruin up your OS if don't know what you are doing)

4.
according to this table and your post from /dev you have your NTFS volumes (partitions) on ad1s1 and ad4s1, so you have to mount lets say like this:
Code:
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/ad1s1 /mnt/windows_c
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/ad4s1 /mnt/windows_d
(like described here: http://wiki.debian.org/NTFS )
before unmounting them do a sync command (just type sync [ENTER], wait for a while, and you can safely unmount them - anyway I still have bad feelings _writing_ on NTFS volumes from non-windows OS - and sync wirtes...)

hope I could help,
eth
If you had actually read the thread you would have noticed that the OP is not using a standard Debian install and this will not work for him, unless he reinstalls with a Linux kernel instead of the BSD kernel.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:59 AM   #18
ethanole
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Distribution: Gentoo, Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Redhat, Mandrake
Posts: 8

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
If you had actually read the thread you would have noticed that the OP is not using a standard Debian install and this will not work for him, unless he reinstalls with a Linux kernel instead of the BSD kernel.
aham, and he forgot to gain root access

eth
 
Old 04-26-2011, 10:32 AM   #19
gentisle
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: USA
Distribution: LinuxMint
Posts: 206

Rep: Reputation: 7
To ventsyv and savona,

May I suggest LinuxMint as something that would be easier to start with. It is Debian based, and I have found it to be much easier to get going and do things for a Newbie. It mounts NTFS partitions by simply clicking on the icon in the file manager window.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 10:41 AM   #20
TobiSGD
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Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentisle View Post
To ventsyv and savona,

May I suggest LinuxMint as something that would be easier to start with. It is Debian based, and I have found it to be much easier to get going and do things for a Newbie. It mounts NTFS partitions by simply clicking on the icon in the file manager window.
Debian has the same behavior. the problem is, as stated a few times above, that he installed it with the FreeBSD kernel. This way one could even argue if it is Linux anymore, it should be named Debian Gnu/kfreebsd.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 11:50 AM   #21
gentisle
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Location: USA
Distribution: LinuxMint
Posts: 206

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Well, being a newbie myself, I guess I didn't quite understand that. The reason being is that I didn't think it was possible to install a BSD package on a Linux system. Seems like I remember trying to do something like that, and it didn't fly. Anyway, I was just trying to help.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 11:55 AM   #22
TobiSGD
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Location: Germany
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Technically, Debian with the FreeBSD kernel isn't Linux. It is a BSD. The packages are compiled for this kernel, and therefore aren't Linux packages.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 01:34 AM   #23
ventsyv
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Registered: Apr 2006
Posts: 57

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
You have downloaded the version with the kfreebsd-kernel. This is not a real Linux version, it is more like a version of FreeBSD. It is not an appropriate version for newbies, but rather for experienced Linux and FreeBSD users. Download and install the standard version (i386, not kfreebsd-i386) and you will have much less problems.
Yeah I realized that. I have used FreeBSD before but in a very limited fashion. Anyways, I downloaded the "regular" Debian and after running the installer a couple of times I was able to get it just right. The drives are recognized as before, but now when I click on them they mount automatically.

As for Linux Mint - I've been trying to install it on my wife's laptop and was having great difficulties getting the microphone to work. I got it eventually, but when I tried Skype the other party could not hear me. I ended up going back to Windows Vista on that one.
 
Old 04-28-2011, 06:43 PM   #24
gentisle
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: USA
Distribution: LinuxMint
Posts: 206

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ventsyv View Post
As for Linux Mint - I've been trying to install it on my wife's laptop and was having great difficulties getting the microphone to work. I got it eventually, but when I tried Skype the other party could not hear me. I ended up going back to Windows Vista on that one.
At first, I couldn't get Skype to work either, but after doing all the updates, and installing all the dependencies (listed on the Skype for online docs), and downloading the latest 2.2 beta Skype 4 Linux, it almost worked. The video flickered in Skype as well as when playing a video file. In beta 2.1, my video was fine, but I could not be heard no matter how I adjusted the mic/mixer settings. I started looking, and finally started poking around in Compiz. I saw that the video box was unchecked, so I checked it. That allowed me to play video. So I thought it would solve the Skype video problem, but never got a chance to try it.

Then there were some updates my system said needed to be downloaded. But they wouldn't download because it said there was a broken package. But that wasn't something I could fix because Synaptics didn't show any broken packages. And running apt-get update/upgrade/clean/auto-clean/remove and everything else I could figure out didn't fix that. Finally I cleared all the packages to be updated, checked the 1st one, and it updated. Then it told me that there where no more updates. What happened to the other 12 that were there before?

Now both the video playback and Skype shows the video correctly - INTERMITTENTLY. Today, I had a Skype call w/someone, and I had to issue a couple of commands (below) and reboot to get the video back on. It wasn't forcing me to issue those commands before the failed update. So one or more of the updates freaked something out in the video. Anyway, I have to issue these commands.

Code:
sudo /usr/bin/metacity --replace (turn off compiz)
sudo /usr/bin/compiz --replace   (turn on  compiz)
I think it's worth you trying again, it just seems like there are a lot of little problems that cause us way too many headaches, and that chases people away from Linux. This is where Windows beats Linux (as much as I hate to admit that). But then OS X beats Windows much more on the same issue. I know it's a lot to wish for, but it would be nice to have a Linux distro that just works. I love to learn about new things on the computer, and new OS, but these days, I don't have as much free time on my hands to learn. Many have suggested this or that distro, and I've tried them, but they either won't boot on my machine, won't install, or won't run after install. Linux Mint seems to do best for me. As always your mileage may vary.

gentisle
 
  


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