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Old 07-31-2008, 10:58 PM   #1
linguru_vv
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mounting


ppl...i wud like to know the advantages of hard mounting in comparison to auto mounting.
and we dont come across this term mountin in WIN rite?
plz enlighten me...
 
Old 07-31-2008, 11:12 PM   #2
onebuck
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Hi,

Maybe! If you would use proper language instead of AOL speak.

If you are referring to using the '/etc/fstab' to control your mounts or are you referring to hal/udev mount of devices that are plugged into the system by a user?

Code:
excerpt from 'man fstab';
NAME
       fstab - static information about the filesystems

SYNOPSIS
       #include <fstab.h>

DESCRIPTION
       The  file fstab contains descriptive information about the various file
       systems.  fstab is only read by programs, and not written;  it  is  the
       duty  of  the system administrator to properly create and maintain this
       file.  Each filesystem is described on a separate line; fields on  each
       line are separated by tabs or spaces.  Lines starting with '#' are com-
       ments.  The order of records in fstab  is  important  because  fsck(8),
       mount(8),  and umount(8) sequentially iterate through fstab doing their
       thing.
Code:
excerpt from 'man udev';
NAME
       udev - dynamic device management

DESCRIPTION
       udev provides a dynamic device directory containing only the files for
       actually present devices. It creates or removes device node files in
       the /dev directory, or it renames network interfaces.

       Usually udev runs as udevd(8) and receives uevents directly from the
       kernel if a device is added or removed from the system.

       If udev receives a device event, it matches its configured rules
       against the available device attributes provided in sysfs to identify
       the device. Rules that match may provide additional device information
       or specify a device node name and multiple symlink names and instruct
       udev to run additional programs as part of the device event handling.
You should read the next two links;
 
Old 07-31-2008, 11:31 PM   #3
eggixyz
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Yes,

It depends what you mean, to a degree, depending on what you're trying to implement and on what OS.

For instance on Linux/Unix, the only real benefit to automounting (if it works properly) is that you don't maintain a constant link over nfs (The benefits of this aren't really worth it any more).

If you want to create static mount in /etc/fstab, just make sure that you set options like bg,soft so that your boot won't hang on a hard mount.

Best wishes,

Mike
 
Old 08-01-2008, 12:29 AM   #4
pixellany
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m sry, bt iz ver difclt unnerstnd ur lannage...hv u lrnd it in h-skool, or did u hafta mk koleg 1st?
 
Old 08-01-2008, 12:40 AM   #5
onebuck
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Hi,

 
Old 08-01-2008, 12:53 AM   #6
jay73
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Hard mounting makes for more convenience and speed while auto-mounting saves resources as filesystem are not mounted until they are needed. Auto-mounting should only be used for filesystems that are accessed only every now and again. Auto-mounting your root partition would be a bad idea considering that each mount will take a little time - just a little but enough to make your system feel annoyingly sluggish. Of course, if the filesystem is accessed all the time, there isn' t any point in auto-mounting either.

Windows does not have these options. It is more proof of the attention that the early versions paid to security and it is a side-effect of its origin as a "mono-box". If a computer is used by only one person, there is little point in control over mounting and unmounting. But when a computer is used by many, one can imagine that it is convenient to have at least some control over who gets to attach devices and which.
 
Old 08-01-2008, 01:30 AM   #7
linguru_vv
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sorry about the language.
actually we guys are plannig a linux workshop at our college. so there is the topic of teaching mounting in linux. most of the students are asking why do this tedious task of mounting by adding entries in /etc/fstab. they ask in windows one needn't do so much to access a mass storage device(make a mount point etc.thats what i mean). so i wanted to know if there was any advantage in doing this the hard way.

and i didn't understand this part @eggixyz..
"For instance on Linux/Unix, the only real benefit to automounting (if it works properly) is that you don't maintain a constant link over nfs (The benefits of this aren't really worth it any more)."
 
Old 08-01-2008, 01:49 AM   #8
onebuck
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Hi,

You should look at 'Linux Newbie Admin Guide', 'Rute Tutorial & Exposition' and 'LinuxSelfHelp' to assist you in the future with your endeavor.

Another good source would be 'Linux Documentation Project'.

Thank you for wording the response so we can communicate.

These links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 08-01-2008, 08:51 AM   #9
pixellany
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I guess it's a bit like choosing between stick and automatic when buying a car. Some give you no choice---Linux simply gives you both......plus a few other things you did not know you wanted... But you also have the ability to delete, turn off, or modify just about anything.
Freedom to choose
Freedom to modify
Freedom to get totally confused....
 
Old 08-01-2008, 01:52 PM   #10
onebuck
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Hi,

I prefer the Chrysler-Plymouth-Dodge-DeSoto Powerflite automatic transmission with push button panel.

Now that was good engineering!
 
Old 08-01-2008, 07:19 PM   #11
pixellany
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DeSoto......hmmmm, that would be several years ago...
 
Old 08-02-2008, 01:28 AM   #12
MafiaTux
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I would help you but when you talk like your texting it's very hard to figure out what your asking

Last edited by MafiaTux; 08-02-2008 at 01:29 AM. Reason: my language was a bit harsh
 
Old 08-02-2008, 08:59 AM   #13
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MafiaTux View Post
I would help you but when you talk like your texting it's very hard to figure out what your asking
If you read the thread, you will see that OP apologized and then started speaking real English.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 09:14 AM   #14
arizonagroovejet
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The concept of mounting and unmounting in Windows does apply it's just not necessarily referred to as that.
I have been asked more than once why it is that you have to unmount a USB drive in Linux before you unplug it. To which my reply is that you don't have to unmount it but you should do and the reason is exactly the same as why you should unmount it in Windows before unplugging it - to make sure that all changes to the files on the drive have actually been written.
Must Windows users just pull the USB drives out and don't bother to unmount them first. But you should unmount a USB drive before unplugging it, even in Windows, though I think in Windows it's maybe referred to as 'stopping' the device.

When you talk about hard mounting and creating entries in /etc/fstab are you thinking about things like Home directories being mounted from a remote server, or things like students plugging in USB drives? For USB drives you don't need to put anything in /etc/fstab, just plug them in and they will mount automatically. For Home directories you can either mount everyone's home directory all at once via an entry in /etc/fstab or you can use automount to mount each home directory individually when a user logs in and unmount it again after they've logged out.
 
  


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