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Old 05-23-2009, 05:00 PM   #1
SSJGoku
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mount types?


hey i was wondering what is the difference in the mount types when u are mounting a partition or another device. ex. ext2, ntfs, lvm2 etc

also when i mounted a partition i created it umounted itself when i restarted the computer, I was wondering if there was a more permanent way to mount things. of course i might have did something later too, though i don't think i did.

the command i used as root was
mount -t ext2 /dev/sda4 /home/Sloan/Desktop/Storage

thanks
 
Old 05-23-2009, 05:05 PM   #2
jamescondron
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First things first- those are different filesystems, they all have their benefits and characteristics.

To mount something from boot, have a look at the file /etc/fstab - I seem to remember it even having a man page if you want to look into it, but yeah- thats where you make that device mount automatically.
 
Old 05-23-2009, 05:05 PM   #3
arckane
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When you mount anything, mount needs to be able to understand the FileSystem type on the target otherwise it won't mount, and there's tons!

As for permanent mounting, lookup up /etc/fstab
 
Old 05-23-2009, 07:37 PM   #4
chrism01
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Just FYI, LVM isn't a filesystem, you have to install ext3 over the top.
LVM is another way of grouping discs into a logical much larger disk (bit like raid).
Actually, you can raid discs together, then put LVM on top, then ext3 on top of that...

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/
 
Old 05-24-2009, 12:08 AM   #5
SSJGoku
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so where can i find what all the different file types do i mean is there a command where is explains it
 
Old 05-24-2009, 05:01 AM   #6
KindOfNeutral
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSJGoku View Post
so where can i find what all the different file types do i mean is there a command where is explains it
For different file systems (ext2, ext3, ext4, reiserfs, ntfs jfs, xfs and) try googling "linux file systems".

They all do the same thing: when a program writes something on the harddisk it actually request the kernel that request the file system to write it to the disk. Diffrent file systems can be optimized for different things: Some are fast with big files, some are efficient with small files, fast with deleting or moving file, maybe more secure in case of power failure, etc.

You can use any file system that your linux kernel supports. ext3 is probably most common, ext4 is faster but it is quite new and may have some bugs.
 
Old 05-24-2009, 05:26 AM   #7
veerain
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try using "man mount" command.
see the different options for mounting file systems.
Also you need to have module or built in driver for linux kernel to use a given filesystem.
 
  


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