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Old 08-21-2012, 04:24 AM   #1
ust
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Mount path


I use df command to show the volumn , only found /home , / , /usr , /var , can advise if I want the path /boot also shown from the command df , what can i do ?

thx
 
Old 08-21-2012, 04:32 AM   #2
evo2
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Hi,

if you have mounted something at /boot it should be shown by df. Can you confirm that you really have a separate /boot partition?

Evo2.
 
Old 08-21-2012, 04:50 AM   #3
ust
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evo2 View Post
Hi,

if you have mounted something at /boot it should be shown by df. Can you confirm that you really have a separate /boot partition?

Evo2.
Yes , I have separate /boot partition but not shown by the command df .

Thanks.
 
Old 08-21-2012, 07:20 AM   #4
eSelix
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Check commands "mount", "cat /etc/mtab" and "df /boot". If "df /boot" show exactly the same data as "df /" then you have not mounted /boot.
 
Old 08-21-2012, 07:20 AM   #5
Soadyheid
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Er... you don't want to mount anything to /boot. That's where the Linux kernel(s) live and boot from The minute you mounted anything there you would no longer have any access to the disk copy of the kernel. The running copy would have been loaded to RAM I'm thinking. No... It's just too ugly to think about. I can see no reason for mounting anything to /boot.

Why do you want df to show /boot? Why don't you just -
Code:
cd /
ls -al
and you'll see all the directories.

Play Bonny!
 
Old 08-21-2012, 07:42 AM   #6
eSelix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soadyheid View Post
That's where the Linux kernel(s) live and boot from The minute you mounted anything there you would no longer have any access to the disk copy of the kernel. The running copy would have been loaded to RAM I'm thinking. No... It's just too ugly to think about. I can see no reason for mounting anything to /boot.
Don't panic He only ask about not showing /boot mount point. Anyway, about mounting, there are some reasons to do that on working system, and you are completly safe, because after reboot, orginal partition will be restored in that mounpoint, as long fstab hasn't been modified. For example, time ago, I realized that my boot partition was to small to properly install updated kernel, which fixes one of annoying bug. I remounted it on free directory, updated, and moved files to orginal boot partition. Other possibility is to unmount /boot partition or remount as read only (for example for security reason) if you currently do not maintenance system, it is necessary only during booting and updating.
 
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Old 08-21-2012, 09:30 AM   #7
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soadyheid View Post
That's where the Linux kernel(s) live and boot from The minute you mounted anything there you would no longer have any access to the disk copy of the kernel. The running copy would have been loaded to RAM I'm thinking. No... It's just too ugly to think about. I can see no reason for mounting anything to /boot.
Just for clarification: The kernel is loaded into RAM at boot time from your boot-manager. You don't need to have the kernel available on-disk while running. If you have a separate /boot partition this partition does not have to be mounted on a running system, except of course in the case you want to install newer kernels or change the bootloader configuration.
Therefore it is totally safe (but not really advisable) to mount anything to /boot.
 
Old 08-21-2012, 09:55 AM   #8
Soadyheid
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OK, I stand corrected. I just couldn't think of a valid reason for using /boot as a mount point. Thanks eSelex for clarification on that point. I usually hold two kernels in /boot and delete the oldest one before each upgrade. Obviously with something mounted on /boot you won't be able to upgrade the kernel without a load of faffing about.
If the Op has a separate /boot partition then you would get a result from df. He didn't mention his partition layout though.

I'll just go and stand in the corner then. Who's got the pointy hat?

Play Bonny!
 
Old 08-21-2012, 07:08 PM   #9
chrism01
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Also, under GRUB < v2, /boot can only be on a std partition or a a RAID1; it cannot be on an LVM.
Hence you'll often see /boot as a separate mt pt.
 
  


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