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Old 04-25-2009, 04:45 AM   #1
stuttie
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Motherboards


My brother and I are wanting to buld a new computer for ourselves and we have chosen to use gigabite boards BPVM-S2H OR EG43M-S2H are these bords compatable with linux mandriva OR SUSE We have been told we would have to load drivers from gigabite site. and others say that they are on the system disk.the choice of board depends on the answer. If the boards listed are not good, can a choice of boards be recomended they need to be 64 bit with on board sound and on board video
My brother is 14 & I am 13 sorry if this is a dumb question.

My big problem with Linux is I just can not get my head around installing software with tar balls and rpms I wish it coud be made easier
When we use rich Bills o/s at school it is just d/click and its there I am reading a lot and getting it I think

Last edited by stuttie; 04-26-2009 at 01:46 AM.
 
Old 04-25-2009, 05:58 AM   #2
H_TeXMeX_H
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For the GA-EG43M-S2H, note:

Quote:
Because of chipset limitations
* To avoid the system being unable to start or the memory being incorrectly detected, if only one memory module is to be installed, we suggest that you install it on the DDR2_1 or DDR2_3 socket; to install two memory modules, we suggest that you install them on the DDR2_1 and DDR2_3 sockets.
* Do not populate both DIMM sockets of the same channel (e.g. DDR and DDR2), or populate 4 DIMM sockets with double-sided memory modules to prevent system's failure to start or incorrect detection of memory modules. Please refer to the user manual for the memory configurations table.
The PVM-S2H has an nForce chipset, not too well supported under Linux.

Also, what are you gonna be using this for ? Games ? On-board video is not a good idea IMO.
 
Old 04-25-2009, 07:29 AM   #3
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stuttie View Post
My big problem with Linux is I just can not get my head around installing software with tar balls and rpms I wish it coud be made easier
With 'proper' package management (rpms, debs, etc) it is difficult to know what you can't get your head around; most distros have a package manager, you select the package(s) you want to install and it does gets it and sorts out the dependencies for you. I must have overlooked what is making it difficult for you...

tarballs are more difficult, but isn't that just a reason for using a package manager?

H_TeXMeX_H wrote:
Quote:
Also, what are you gonna be using this for ? Games ? On-board video is not a good idea IMO.
If you meant that on board video is not a good idea for games, particularly fps games, then I would agree. OTOH, on board video does give you lower system cost and can give lower power consumption so it does have arguments in its favour. It is true though, that you do have to be careful about support for your chosen chipset and it is always worth considering whether you want to be able to have the capacity to add a video later, as technology progresses.
 
Old 04-25-2009, 07:40 AM   #4
H_TeXMeX_H
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What I mean was that don't expect to be able to play games with on-board video, it's not gonna happen. You could probably play tetris and simple 2D games, but that's about it. Watching movies may be a problem as well, don't expect HD or anything. Expect base level graphics. Both integrated Intel and Nvidia graphics have major issues and you will likely get bad performance out of them. And you can't replace them, you have to buy a graphics card and so you kinda pay double the money for nothing. It's your choice and it depends on what you want to do with the system.
 
Old 04-25-2009, 08:24 AM   #5
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by stuttie View Post
My brother and I are wanting to buld a new computer for ourselves and we have chosen to use gigabite boards BPVM-S2H OR EG43M-S2H are these bords compatable with linux mandriva OR SUSE We have been told we would have to load drivers from gigabite site. and others say that they are on the system disk.the choice of board depends on the answer. If the boards listed are not good, can a choice of boards be recomended they need to be 64 bit with on board sound and on board video
My brother is 14 & I am 13 sorry if this is a dumb question.

My big problem with Linux is I just can not get my head around installing software with tar balls and rpms I wish it coud be made easier
Welcome to LQ!

You might get some information from the 'HCL', particular the 'MotherBoard section'.

Not a dumb question to ask but you can do some searching here on LQ to see how others have addressed this question.

I suggest that you don't reveal too much personal information, your age, your detailed location or anything that may cause you future problems. Here on LQ you should not run into any problems but it's always better to be safe.

You can use the 'Slackware-Links' for future reference. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 04-25-2009, 08:44 AM   #6
mrrangerman
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Quote:
H_TeXMeX_H

The PVM-S2H has an nForce chipset, not too well supported under Linux.
Um for the last 5yrs about every motherboard I've used has had the nForce chipset and have not had a single problem, I've installed most of the main Linux distro's. The system I'm typing this on is a Asus M2n-sli deluxe Am2 with the nForce chipset, I'm running Debian stable/lenny.
Or maybe I'm just fortunate that I've not had any problem.
 
Old 04-25-2009, 10:08 AM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrangerman View Post
Um for the last 5yrs about every motherboard I've used has had the nForce chipset and have not had a single problem, I've installed most of the main Linux distro's. The system I'm typing this on is a Asus M2n-sli deluxe Am2 with the nForce chipset, I'm running Debian stable/lenny.
Or maybe I'm just fortunate that I've not had any problem.
You're right, it might not have any problems, but there have been reports of issues with them, especially sound and hard lockups. Maybe they have been resolved ?
 
Old 04-26-2009, 01:12 AM   #8
stuttie
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stuttie
The reasion for on board sound and on board video is $ but would like to up grad to PCI cards later.
 
Old 04-26-2009, 04:37 AM   #9
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
What I mean was that don't expect to be able to play games with on-board video, it's not gonna happen. You could probably play tetris and simple 2D games, but that's about it.
With the better solutions, you can do rather better than that; its not going to give you the kind of performance that a separate video card will, but games earlier than the last couple of years should be within reach (with the usual caveats of maybe having to turn down levels of detail and switching off anti-aliasing if performance is not what you want); non-FPS games should be ok even if they are that bit more recent.

In any case, with the poorer availability of games on the Linux platform, if gaming is a major interest, you'll probably want to consider dual booting as an option.

Quote:
Watching movies may be a problem as well, don't expect HD or anything.
Note that under other OSs, the ATI (read AMD) chipsets are particularly designed to deliver good movie playback with low load on the CPU (not just do it, but doing it with either a low load or a lower power cpu - you will, of course, have noted that at the time AMD developed these chipsets it was having to make the best of a bad job, with low-ish power consumption, low-ish computing power solutions being all that it could offer) with a particular aim of making media centre devices possible while keeping power dissipation low. I am not sure how much of this performance survives with the Linux drivers, but if you are interested in this particular aspect, I would suggest that you look at the benchmarking results on a Linux benchmarking site, such as Phoronix.

In general, there are three chipset manufacturers in the game; Intel, AMD/ATI and nVidia. Intel have been off the pace of the others with integrated graphics for years, but are still adequate if you don't have gaming aspirations (although, for as long as I can remember, they have been promising that their next chipset will change the rules of the game). Note also that you can't choose chipset independantly of processor family; Intel and AMD (obviously?) only support their own processor families.

Quote:
Expect base level graphics. Both integrated Intel and Nvidia graphics have major issues and you will likely get bad performance out of them.
There is a problem with drivers; you are making a small gamble on whether your selected chipset supplier will choose, in future, to take linux support seriously (whether its drivers directly or whether its supplying full documentation to others). It has been clear, at times, that Linux drivers are not anywhere near their highest priority and how that will progress is anybody's guess.


Quote:
And you can't replace them, you have to buy a graphics card and so you kinda pay double the money for nothing.
Not really; if you look at the price for motherboards with integrated graphics, because they tend to be aimed at the more price-sensitive end of the market, it is difficult to see the extra price that you are paying for the graphics 'add-ons'. OTOH, because these tend to be the smaller boards (which fit into standard cases, just leaving even more surrounding air than is usual), you might find that its difficult to get all of the peripheral interfaces that you want, if you want lots of USBs, e-SATA, parallel/RS232 ports, (or even enough SATAs for elaborate raid arrays) etc, etc.
 
Old 04-26-2009, 11:31 AM   #10
stuttie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stuttie View Post
stuttie
The reasion for on board sound and on board video is $ but would like to up grad to PCI cards later.
Everything is easy when you know how!!
 
Old 04-27-2009, 07:35 AM   #11
onebuck
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Hi,

The big problem some people run into are driver related. Not all vendors support GNU/Linux but everyday the scope is changing with vendors coming on board.

As long as the hardware marries then you should not have major problems unless the drivers are not there.
 
Old 04-27-2009, 11:47 AM   #12
inspiron_Droid
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Avoid Asrock at all costs,> I highly recommend that you check the hardware compatibility list for your distribution of choice. Any mother board should work as long as it doesn't have n ati chip[ sethat being said try to pay specail attention to the chipset manaufacturer for the Video, Lan and Sound.

Thanks and happy building,
Porter
 
Old 04-27-2009, 12:26 PM   #13
malekmustaq
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stuttie:

Q-"Everything is easy when you know how!!"

Yes, and what you must strive actually is to learn and "know how" linux works.

Q-"My big problem with Linux is I just can not get my head around installing software with tar balls and rpms I wish it coud be made easier
When we use rich Bills o/s at school it is just d/click and its there I am reading a lot and getting it I think"

There is no sense at comparing Linux with that "rich Bill's o/s" its like comparing a limousine with that of a horse pulled wagon: the former runs faster and more advanced in almost everything. Only that, you are still new to it. That's why you have need to read a little and apply what is learned into your new system: learn to crawl before you learn to walk. This is how we learned microsoft windows; this is how we learn about Gnu/Linux too; this is how nature works.

I am using nForce, onboard, and still I play games. There is nothing too much to worry with the current or later hardware. Check options at the HCL of the LQ and be assured in what you choose.

Go get a copy of rute tutorial, make it your guide or reference as you progress in Linux:
http://www.freebookcentre.net/unix-b...heer)-PDF.html

Hope this helps a little to picture out your new challenge.

Goodluck.

Last edited by malekmustaq; 04-27-2009 at 12:33 PM.
 
  


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