LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-17-2011, 04:50 PM   #16
leoio2
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Posts: 18

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0

slackyman: So, perhaps the links I listed are not what I should be studying right now then? For "Gentoo, its hardware support, its working model" I'm using:
http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handboo...l=1#book_part1

And for "python "thinking", python developing style and -yes - basic Linux knowledge.", I'm using:
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/p.../genindex.html

Can you please list your links (in order from knowing nothing to LFS) regarding how I should progress if what I listed is inadequate? I'm on chapter 6 of the Python course currently. I have tons of questions about it but I am waiting to finish the entire course before I inquire here about them.
Quote:
And don't forget the LSB!
I assume you're referring to learning this after I finish LFS.
http://ldn.linuxfoundation.org/lsb/lsb-introduction

Last edited by leoio2; 03-17-2011 at 04:51 PM.
 
Click here to see the post LQ members have rated as the most helpful post in this thread.
Old 03-18-2011, 02:32 AM   #17
Slackyman
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Rome - Italy
Distribution: Slackware 13.1
Posts: 347

Rep: Reputation: 44
You're doing right.
The best practice (IMHO) is to start with official documentatin - just as you're doing - and then investigate further every doubt or minuteness of the matter by searching other people's documentation, blog and... forum.
So - yes - you're doing right.
More, since LFS was thought to build an OS up taking care of LSB, I think you have at least know what we're talking about
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-18-2011, 03:30 AM   #18
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
You're definately headed in the right direction.
Before going to Gentoo & LFS, which are 2 of the more difficult installs, install any linux OS and make it stable running system, play around with it & if it breaks fix it without reinstalling. Basically get your feet wet and learn linux, then move to the harder things.

Last edited by EDDY1; 03-18-2011 at 03:33 AM.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 02:59 PM   #19
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
@leoio
I made a comment regarding fixing OS when broke without reinstalling.
Well mine is broke.
Iceweasel not working, no bin, can't reinstall, can't get exclusive lock.
Update manager say 68 updates, Iclick on it it gives blank screen
Can't get into synaptic.
I've got a message saying
Quote:
kernel: [ 206.258738] ACPI: EC: GPE storm detected, transactions will use polling mode
Any way there are a few other things that are going on.
I ran "zcat" command now I have extra directories in /home.
I guess I'll have a chance at finding out what I learned in the last 15mos.
This will possibly be the first time that I will not reinstall os.
It will be a good feeling if I can do it.
I've only had this system running since Nov and don't have anything important to lose, but would like to repair instead of reinstall.

Last edited by EDDY1; 03-19-2011 at 03:50 PM.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 03:34 PM   #20
Shadowmeph
Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: West Coast Canada
Posts: 260

Rep: Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
You're definately headed in the right direction.
Before going to Gentoo & LFS, which are 2 of the more difficult installs, install any linux OS and make it stable running system, play around with it & if it breaks fix it without reinstalling. Basically get your feet wet and learn linux, then move to the harder things.
I cannot agree with you more on this, I did the mistake of installing Arch Linux ( Not even sure how I succeeded at this since I was and still am a total Noob lol) and figured Wow that wasn't that hard then tried LFS and got very Disheartened because it was way beyond my capabilities which moved me back to Windows , now I am starting over and have forgotten almost everything about Linux.
My advice is to do what EDDY1 has said and take it slow and easy
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-19-2011, 03:49 PM   #21
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
@shadowmeph
What we definately have to take it easy, while learning as much as possible. Failures can be discouraging, that's why you need to get a stable running system, so that you can see what it requires to run.
I hate that my machine took a dive, but now I can learn from it.
 
Old 03-19-2011, 03:59 PM   #22
brian-va
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
If you jump straight into Gentoo or LFS, you may just get upset when you get stuck. Ditch XP and install debian testing, make it work, and keep it working for a while. By a while, I don't mean install it then say "cool it works," then move on to the next item on the list. Use it as your daily usage OS for a good while, 6+ months. Then upgrade to sid, or better yet a mixed testing/unstable/experimental system, and run that for a while. Sid and experimental should keep you entertained for a while.

Once you become comfortable using this type of setup and fixing what WILL break, move to something harder, like a source based OS. From what I have seen, there is no guide to show an inexperienced Linux user to install and maintain something like LFS as your daily usage OS. This doesn't mean you cant look at the others, VM's are perfect for this. If they fail, you can start over, and your main OS is left untouched.

As for all the Comp. Sci. stuff you want to learn, one place you may not have seen is the MIT Opencourseware site. There is a ton of info available there. Obviously you need a good foundation to understand it completely, but you did say you want to learn everything. Read some of it, then look up what you don't understand.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-19-2011, 05:02 PM   #23
Fred Caro
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Posts: 999

Rep: Reputation: 166Reputation: 166
brian,
yes but,regarding the rest of the comments,a starting point to come from is difficult if you want to ignore the gui.
Breaking a system in order to fix it sounds like a medical condition.
Reading documentation is hit and miss by default, it seems, but I do look for the boiling down of CLI info. but it seems impossible due to the choice of 'ways to do it' so comes back to 'learn by practise'.

Fred.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 12:05 AM   #24
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
@Fred Caro
I never suggested breaking intentionally
Quote:
You're definately headed in the right direction.
Before going to Gentoo & LFS, which are 2 of the more difficult installs, install any linux OS and make it stable running system,
Quote:
play around with it & if it breaks fix it without reinstalling
. Basically get your feet wet and learn linux, then move to the harder think.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 02:17 AM   #25
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
Well this is the first time
 
Old 03-20-2011, 02:19 AM   #26
leoio2
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Posts: 18

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Yeah, I am just doing a ton of reading now. It will take a couple of months unfortunately but I'll try to keep you all updated.
 
Old 03-20-2011, 04:25 AM   #27
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
When I made this statement I meant to say this is the first time I was able to recover my system without reinstalling os.
Quote:
Well this is the first time
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RHEL 6 Deployment guide missing from distro? thespaceman Red Hat 1 01-19-2011 04:59 PM
The Reg guide to Linux, part 1: Picking a distro XavierP Linux - News 1 06-22-2010 07:42 AM
LXer: The Reg guide to Linux, part 1: Picking a distro LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 06-21-2010 08:50 PM
Is experimenting with Linux for the first time as a virtual machine beneficial? foodown Linux - General 35 03-21-2010 09:33 PM
LXer: Our guide to building your own online distro LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 12-07-2008 06:01 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:44 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration