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Old 07-11-2011, 11:44 AM   #1
jcampbell2
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Registered: Jul 2011
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04
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Minimizing Ubuntu 11


Let me start by saying that I am extremely new to Linux. I have a Compaq Evo N110 laptop PC that is old and slow. After putting Win2k on it and discovering that there were several drivers that were not available, I upgraded to WinXP only to find out that WinXP was WAY too much f a resource hog. I then installed Ubuntu 11.04 and it is just as slow as WinXP. My question is this: How to I make my Linux OS smaller and less of a resource hog so that my laptop isnt soooooo slooooow?
 
Old 07-11-2011, 12:48 PM   #2
snowpine
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What are your system's hardware specs?

If it's an older system, you should probably try a "lightweight" distro such as Puppy Linux that is designed specifically for older hardware.

Google "ubuntu system requirements," "puppy linux system requirements," etc. and you'll see there are Linux distributions or "distros" available to meet all needs.

The best way to make your laptop faster, of course, is to use modern hardware. Treat yourself to a new laptop from a Linux vendor like System76 and you'll be able to enjoy Ubuntu in blazing-fast glory!

Good luck!
 
Old 07-11-2011, 01:00 PM   #3
baxzius
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Location: India
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Welcome to this Forum.i hope i can solve your problem!!! Brother from Indiana.
First of all,
You can take decisions..
1)If you are interested to Install new Linux By formating existing one
You can install the Pocket Linux called Slax.(click here to go to the official website)

Slax is a modern, portable, small and fast Linux operating system with a modular approach and outstanding design. Despite its small size, Slax provides a wide collection of pre-installed software for daily use, including a well organized graphical user interface and useful recovery tools for system administrators.

2)If you are really interested to minimize the existing Ubuntu then
b)Uninstall or remove unwanted softwares.by using Janitor.(Click here to see the Process with Pictures)
a)Now you can really uninstall unwanted softwares using manual sytle.
sudo apt-get remove {package-name}

For example remove package called mplayer, enter:
$ sudo apt-get remove mplayer

Remove package called lighttpd along with all configuration files, enter:
$ sudo apt-get --purge remove lighttpd

To list all installed package, enter:
dpkg --list
dpkg --list | less
dpkg --list | grep -i 'http



Now its your job to realise which are useful softares and unuseful softwares.
You can remove APACHE etc if you dont want to work concern Web Server purposes.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-11-2011, 02:55 PM   #4
tlhonmey
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Registered: Nov 2008
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The key to reducing resource usage isn't so much uninstalling programs, as it is to trim down what's running.

On Ubuntu, there are a lot of things running just in case you need them. So, to start with, go into System->Preferences->Startup Manager and turn off anything that you know you're not using.

Second thing to do is to look in the /etc/init.d directory and turn off any extra services that you know you're not using. You can usually use the command "man" to look up what the scripts in there are starting and decide if you need it or not.

Third thing to do, if all that doesn't help, (or possibly the first thing to if you're certain that it won't) is probably to swap your standard ubuntu for xubuntu or lubuntu. both are designed for older machines and uses less flashy, but less resource intensive versions of many programs. You can either reinstall, or install the xubuntu-desktop package from the repository. Reinstalling is usually better since there will be less disk space wasted, but if you have plenty of disk, then do whichever's more convenient. I haven't looked at lubuntu, but I would assume it works the same way.

If that doesn't get you enough freed up to work well, take a look at http://distrowatch.com/search.php?ca...&status=Active

That will give you a list of ones to try that are designed to work well on older hardware.
 
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:23 PM   #5
Duron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcampbell2 View Post
I have a Compaq Evo N110 laptop
As a point of reference going forward, that's a 1GHz Pentium III with 128MB or 256MB RAM standard, 576MB max.

Give Linux Mint Debian Edition a shot. Even with GNOME running, the first version of the rolling distro could hover at around 110MB RAM usage (granted, with nothing else running) and that hasn't seemed to increase terribly much with subsequent ones. So tear out GNOME and replace it with something lighter, again, like XFCE or LXDE.

If that sounds too daunting, a fresh install of Crunchbang 10 includes both Openbox and XFCE, and you can immediately switch between them in the login screen.
 
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:44 PM   #6
jcampbell2
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Location: Indiana
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04
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This particular N110 has 256Mb of ram.
 
Old 07-11-2011, 03:48 PM   #7
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcampbell2 View Post
This particular N110 has 256Mb of ram.
That gives you plenty of options including Xubuntu, Lubuntu, AntiX, CrunchBang, Puppy, etc.

But not Ubuntu which recommends 512mb minimum:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/In...emRequirements

If you want to lighten your existing Ubuntu system without reinstalling, try installing the Lubuntu Desktop from the software manager or:

Code:
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install lubuntu-desktop
Then log out, and you should be able to select LXDE/Lubuntu from the login screen.
 
Old 07-11-2011, 04:23 PM   #8
baxzius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlhonmey View Post
The key to reducing resource usage isn't so much uninstalling programs, as it is to trim down what's running.

On Ubuntu, there are a lot of things running just in case you need them. So, to start with, go into System->Preferences->Startup Manager and turn off anything that you know you're not using.

Second thing to do is to look in the /etc/init.d directory and turn off any extra services that you know you're not using. You can usually use the command "man" to look up what the scripts in there are starting and decide if you need it or not.

Third thing to do, if all that doesn't help, (or possibly the first thing to if you're certain that it won't) is probably to swap your standard ubuntu for xubuntu or lubuntu. both are designed for older machines and uses less flashy, but less resource intensive versions of many programs. You can either reinstall, or install the xubuntu-desktop package from the repository. Reinstalling is usually better since there will be less disk space wasted, but if you have plenty of disk, then do whichever's more convenient. I haven't looked at lubuntu, but I would assume it works the same way.

If that doesn't get you enough freed up to work well, take a look at http://distrowatch.com/search.php?ca...&status=Active

That will give you a list of ones to try that are designed to work well on older hardware.

Any way If our friend is really interesting to increase the speed of his Compaq stuff!!!!
The most basic thing to do is to see that the IDE driver is using DMA. Run "hdparm -d /dev/hda" and see that it is set to 1. If not, run "hdparm -d1 /dev/hda" to turn it on. Running on PIO will degrade performance dreadfully, especially if processes like updatedb are running.
Otherwise, running services will hardly affect your system performance at all.
 
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:49 PM   #9
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baxzius View Post
Any way If our friend is really interesting to increase the speed of his Compaq stuff!!!!
The most basic thing to do is to see that the IDE driver is using DMA. Run "hdparm -d /dev/hda" and see that it is set to 1. If not, run "hdparm -d1 /dev/hda" to turn it on. Running on PIO will degrade performance dreadfully, especially if processes like updatedb are running.
Otherwise, running services will hardly affect your system performance at all.
Uhh..."running services will hardly affect your system performance" is totally wrong. The more programs that are running=more load on your PC=slower PC. Same as it is for ANY OS. Also, uninstalling programs that aren't being RUN, does nothing to make your system faster.

PIO will degrade performance, but only when you're pulling lots of data from the drive. If processes are already running, having quicker disk access won't matter, since everything is already in RAM, isn't it?

OP, 256MB is what's killing you, as snowpine pointed out. I'd also suggest Puppy, Fluxbox, or TinyME for a machine with those specs, along with strongly suggesting you update your BIOS before doing a load, as there have been ACPI issues noted with Linux and that particular Compaq with older BIOS.
 
  


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