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casperdaghost 09-18-2013 10:53 AM

measuring performance gain on procees
 
I installed openbox window manager on my Ubuntu 12.4 LTS virtual machine.
Everybody talks about how much memory it saves.
My question is - how do I calculalte how much memory it saves. What do i look for on a before and after - how do I track how much memory it saves. How do i track performance gain?

suicidaleggroll 09-18-2013 11:06 AM

Run "top" or "free" to check idle memory usage, and compare it.

Memory savings rarely translate into a "performance gain" or speed improvement, unless of course you run out of memory and have to start digging into swap.

zeebra 09-19-2013 02:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll (Post 5030061)
Run "top" or "free" to check idle memory usage, and compare it.

Memory savings rarely translate into a "performance gain" or speed improvement, unless of course you run out of memory and have to start digging into swap.

If you want to run a cheap system that takes less power, then there are significant "performance gains" to be made from lowering the memory footprint.

Quote:

Originally Posted by casperdaghost (Post 5030054)
I installed openbox window manager on my Ubuntu 12.4 LTS virtual machine.
Everybody talks about how much memory it saves.
My question is - how do I calculalte how much memory it saves. What do i look for on a before and after - how do I track how much memory it saves. How do i track performance gain?

Use "top" as suicidaleggroll suggested to check the memory usage.

Furthermore, this article has some interesting comparisons.
http://l3net.wordpress.com/2013/03/1...inux-desktops/

cascade9 09-19-2013 05:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zeebra (Post 5030487)
If you want to run a cheap system that takes less power, then there are significant "performance gains" to be made from lowering the memory footprint.

If you want to run ancient machines with small amounts of RAM, yeah.

For newer machines, which tend to be more energy efficient than older systems, using a minimal system with a lower memory use desktop wont help that much.

If you've got 2GB+, the difference between the memory consumption of KDE 4.X/Gnome 3/Unity and really light desktops doesnt matter much, if at all.


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