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Old 07-19-2004, 08:44 PM   #16
RobertP
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umask =000 corresponds to permissions 777 or everyone and everything can read/write/execute

umask=022 corresponds to permissions 755 or others can only read and execute. Execute is important for browsing the files. You could use dmask=022,fmask=033 to block execution of files while allowing browsing of directories

Do not forget to change msec's setting to match your desired permissions.
 
Old 07-29-2004, 10:54 AM   #17
gmusser
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msec ignores perm.local

I'm running into a similar problem. In my case, msec is ignoring my perm.local file. I'm running at security level 4. Help!
George Musser
 
Old 08-01-2004, 11:41 PM   #18
johngcarlsson
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gmusser,
Is it an 'operation not permitted' message with a FAT32 drive like me? Have you messed w/ fstab?
 
Old 08-02-2004, 08:23 PM   #19
RobertP
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Re: msec ignores perm.local

Quote:
Originally posted by gmusser
I'm running into a similar problem. In my case, msec is ignoring my perm.local file. I'm running at security level 4. Help!
George Musser
Here is what you'll find abut overriding msec:
from MandrakeUser
Quote:
If you want to override some permissions, you can do this with the /etc/security/msec/perm.local file. Each level has it's own set of different file permissions for some certain files. If you want to take a look at the defaults for each level, look at the /usr/share/msec/perm.* files. They contain the file name (or directory), the user/group that should own it, and the numeric permissions for the file or directory. Let's say, for example, that you are using level 4 but don't want to have /boot with only 700 permissions, which is the default in level 4. You would create your /etc/security/msec/perm.local file and write in it the following:
/boot/ root.root 755

Then you would execute msec (just type "msec" at the command prompt as root), and if you look at the permissions of the /boot directory now, you will see it is 755, so normal users can look in there.

*
It seems you may have neglected to run msec after changing perm.local...
 
  


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