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Old 03-13-2010, 06:12 AM   #1
Gallifrey
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Looking for a book recommendation!


Hello all,
I've been using Linux for my desktop for a couple of months now, but want to get more in depth, and start doing things for myself a little more.

Can anyone recommend a good book on linux commands? Preferably one with a newbie in mind, which covers the commands available in linux and explains how they are implemented, available options, syntax, etc. If possible, one which covers differences in command implementation between distros as well, and compiling software packages/resolving dependencies, and shell scripting. Also the realtionship between linux and hardware (HAL and udev).Basically a nuts-and-bolts look under the hood kind of book.

All suggestions would be appreciated. Many thanks.
 
Old 03-13-2010, 06:29 AM   #2
reed9
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I don't know about print books, but the Linux Documentation Project has a tremendous amount of good information.
http://tldp.org/guides.html
 
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Old 03-13-2010, 06:36 AM   #3
bret381
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I just downloaded this myself to have a read, so I don't know how good it is but thought I'd pass it along:

Linux Command Line
 
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Old 03-13-2010, 07:03 AM   #4
pixellany
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http://www.amazon.com/Linux-2005-Dep.../dp/1592007287 (I'm not sure if it has been updated.)

Also, browse around on the O'Reilly site.
 
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Old 03-13-2010, 07:08 AM   #5
raju.mopidevi
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commands
resolving dependencies ..? your package manager does it !
 
Old 03-13-2010, 07:58 AM   #6
cantab
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O'Reilly's Linux Pocket Guide is a good reference. It includes the basics of shell scripting. But it says nothing about the architecture of a Linux system, hal or udev.
 
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Old 03-13-2010, 08:23 AM   #7
Gallifrey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raju.mopidevi View Post
commands
resolving dependencies ..? your package manager does it !
I have come across a few packages for which there are no .DEB or .RPM packages, and have to be compiled from source. On top of which, I also use Slackware, OpenSolaris and OpenBSD, for which installable packages are quite hard to find at times.
 
Old 03-13-2010, 08:31 AM   #8
ceantuco
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I agree with Cantab! The O'Reilly's Linux Pocket Guide is another tool in my Tech tool kit! good luck!
 
Old 03-13-2010, 08:36 AM   #9
jstephens84
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This one Beginning Linux command line and this one Classical shell scripting
 
Old 03-13-2010, 08:49 AM   #10
jschiwal
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For Linux commands, look at Linux in a Nutshell.

I installed the source for the coreutils package and then ran:
./configure
make pdf

Then I printed it out and keep it in a three ring binder.

For some commands that I find I always need to resort to the manpage, a printout is handy and much easier to read:
man -Tps <topic> | lpr

The info manual for AWK is an excellent book: "GAWK: Effective AWK Programming", however, the O'Reilly "Sed & AWK" book is even better, and the 1st edition may be available on the web. For the latter, look or a gawk-doc package. If you don't have one, you can generate it yourself, or maybe find it on the GNU website.

The Samba website will have the same 3 Samba3 books you can buy in the book store. Many distros supply it in a Samba-doc package.

Your distro may have a "books" package, containing the "Network Administrators Guide" and "System Administrators' Guide", and maybe even a package containing the documentation found on the tldp.org website.

Last edited by jschiwal; 03-13-2010 at 08:50 AM.
 
Old 03-13-2010, 08:49 AM   #11
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gallifrey View Post
Can anyone recommend a good book on linux commands? Preferably one with a newbie in mind, which covers the commands available in linux and explains how they are implemented, available options, syntax, etc.
Here is a good tutorial on basic linux commands. It helped me a lot when I first began using commands in the terminal:
http://linuxcommand.org/learning_the_shell.php
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gallifrey View Post
If possible, one which covers differences in command implementation between distros
The differences between distros will mostly be limited to the package management tools used (i.e., apt-get, yum, urpmi, pacman, etc) The basic commands listed in the tutorial I linked to will be useful on any distro. That is the advantage of using the terminal. Most of the commands will be consistent across different distros.

If you need help with individual commands, just try googling the "command_name tutorial" or "command_name how to". For example, just google <chmod tutorial> (without quotes or <>) and see what comes up. I have found much useful info this way.

As for books, I bought the 2006 version of the Linux Bible when I first started with linux. I learned a lot from it. The 2010 version is out now:
http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Bible-20...8491370&sr=1-1
If you search around I think you can find all the info you need for free on the internet though.

BTW, you can read Linux in a Nutshell for free here:
http://books.google.com/books?id=sI_...age&q=&f=false

Last edited by tommcd; 03-13-2010 at 08:59 AM.
 
Old 03-13-2010, 10:12 AM   #12
cantab
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Some other variations between distros:

The ultra-small distros that use things like Busybox instead of the GNU utils.
Locations of configuration files vary somewhat.

The boot process and configuration files varies - most Linux distributions use the System V init, but some (notably Slackware) use the BSD-style init, and then Ubuntu uses Upstart.

The overwhelmingly majority of Linux distributions use the GNU userland programs (hence why rms would like us to call them GNU/Linux). In principle you could run the BSD userland on the Linux kernel. Such a distribution would technically be Linux, but in practice would behave more like a BSD variant from the user's perspective. (I know of no such distribution, so this is theoretical).
 
Old 03-13-2010, 10:29 AM   #13
worm5252
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I am not going to argue if there are good books out there. Personally If I wanted to know something I just searched google for that subject matter and read several websites containing documentation. After you read 2 or 3 you pretty much get it. For example if I want to know basic shell commands, and I know I am using the default bash shell I might search for "Linux+Bash+cli+basic commands". Should give some decent results. If not I modify my search till I find what I want.

Yea it isn't as easy as opening the index and finding what page you need, but it is a lot cheaper to use the resources you already have instead of buying a book.
 
  


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