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Old 01-31-2011, 11:48 PM   #1
lxnewbie123
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Question Looking 4 distro suggestions 4 AM64 2G machine


Specifically I am looking for solid reliability of the file system, stability, interoperability (dual boot) with WinXP and NTFS partitions, and a MS Windows-like GUI. Also want ease of use - I don't want to have to do a lot of research on dependancies and libraries and all that when I want to add new software items. I don't want to have to become an OS expert to enjoy the reliability that I'm hoping to find with a Linux OS.

Hardware is AMD Athlon64 plus 3MB RAM plus 180GB HD shared with WindowsXP dual boot, running NTFS in it's partitions. So what's best for my purposes? Kubuntu? Lubuntu? Debian w/ KDE or xfce or lxde? Ubuntu plus KDE al a' carte? I'm a bit lost in the alphabit soup and can only think that it will be a major effort just to evaluate the many different options. Is there an easier way to pick a distro? Should I be looking at freeBSD + KDE instead of Linux in order to find reliability and stability? I really don't want to go through a file system crash, or frequest OS crashes.

Last edited by lxnewbie123; 01-31-2011 at 11:50 PM. Reason: typo
 
Old 01-31-2011, 11:58 PM   #2
EDDY1
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Ubuntu may be your best bet, but with all os'es you'll have to learn how to work with it.
 
Old 02-01-2011, 10:31 AM   #3
onebuck
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

Get Your ISO, LiveCD & Pocket OS section contains loads of links. The LiveCD List is a good List to choose a LiveCD from to test drive a Gnu/Linux. LiveCD Wiki provides detailed explanation plus a good resource.

Just a few links to aid you to gaining some understanding;



1 Linux Documentation Project
2 Rute Tutorial & Exposition
3 Linux Command Guide
4 Bash Beginners Guide
5 Bash Reference Manual
6 Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
7 Linux Newbie Admin Guide
8 LinuxSelfHelp
9 Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
10 Linux Home Networking
11 Virtualiation- Top 10

The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!


EDIT: (Linux is Not Windows): Refers to the GNU/Linux OS and various Free & Open-Source Software (FOSS) projects under the catch-all name of 'Linux'.

Last edited by onebuck; 02-01-2011 at 10:34 AM. Reason: add link reference
 
Old 02-01-2011, 11:00 AM   #4
Soadyheid
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I'd try Ubuntu 10.10 if I were you. Download a live CD and try it out before you install it. If you don't like it, try a different live CD.
Quote:
I don't want to have to do a lot of research on dependancies and libraries and all that when I want to add new software items. I don't want to have to become an OS expert to enjoy the reliability that I'm hoping to find with a Linux OS.
In Ubuntu and other Linux Distros, software is installed from repositories using package manager software which handles all the dependencies. No setup.exe stuff like in Window Land. It's all very civilised, but if you expect Linux to behave like Windows you'll be disappointed. It doesn't run Windows software natively, use Linux alternatives! Have a go and keep an open mind!

Play Bonny!
 
Old 02-01-2011, 04:50 PM   #5
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lxnewbie123 View Post
Hardware is AMD Athlon64 plus 3MB RAM plus 180GB HD ...
I'd like to hope that you have slightly more than 3M of RAM...3G, maybe?

Everything will meet your stability goals (possible exception; KDE 4.1 and 4.2); try some Live DVDs to see what you like. It would help if you chose an initial GUI, but if you can't do that, you can usually install several and choose at login time. Try to avoid early versions of KDE 4 as they may not move your stability objectives, but KDE 4.4 onwards would probably be fine; but then, maybe you'd prefer Gnome or XFCE or LXDE; we can't tell you that.

After about six months, think whether you have achieved all your objectives and whether you want to change something.

PS, I don't think that Kubuntu (KDE Ubuntu) does as good a job with KDE as Ubuntu (Gnome Ubuntu) does with Gnome, so if you do want KDE, maybe have a look at something like Simply Mepis or maybe Mint.
 
Old 02-01-2011, 05:35 PM   #6
Jebe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lxnewbie123 View Post
interoperability (dual boot) with WinXP and NTFS partitions
As long as it is dual boot, and thus Windows isn't actively defending itself, there's not any issues with mounting a Windows partition. Now dealing with the trick of them fighting over bootloaders is more interesting and in my experience:

-Install Linux base system, partitioning as desired for permanent using desired Linux file system.
-Install Windows to its partition.
-Reinstall Linux with permanent install to the Linux partitions.

works best, as it insures GRUB is on the first part of the hard drive and thus won't become lost, and has the least headaches associated with MBR flip flop. There's really no reason to use NTFS for Linux.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lxnewbie123 View Post
a MS Windows-like GUI
Which version of Windows, given the GUI radically changes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lxnewbie123 View Post
Hardware is AMD Athlon64 plus 3[GB?] RAM plus 180GB HD shared with WindowsXP dual boot
If you have only 3MB of RAM you've done something very entertaining. With the presumed 3GB you shouldn't be RAM limited for desktop usage. Now you start trying to turn it into a server with virtual machines on a hypervisor or massive graphic file type things then there's an issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lxnewbie123 View Post
So what's best for my purposes? Kubuntu? Lubuntu? Debian w/ KDE or xfce or lxde? Ubuntu plus KDE al a' carte?
Ubuntu=Debian Unstable under a different wrapper, and I see plenty of comments associated with Debian of people not liking stability issues with Ubuntu and switching to the stable main branch. Why not give PCLinuxOS, OpenSuse or Mandriva Free a spin? Those three are designed to be stable with a good desktop experience coming from Windows and have a control panel-like thing aiding with familiarity. You will need to do some configuration stuff to do things like play mp3s and DVDs due to IP right issues for them and those you've listed.

Crashes in Linux are atypical in my experience, in the Windows sense of the word. I've had WinE (Windows Compatibility layer program) crash a Workspace semiroutinely when trying to get programs to work, but you can switch to a different workspace and restart WinE with the proper command in the Terminal. The bigger issue is Linux is basically a web of packages referencing other packages and things related to this can break when using automated package handlers. Uninstalling packages removing a important dependency tending to be a bigger issue then installing new packages causing an overwrite in my experience. One of Slackware's advertising points is that they take measures to avoid this and give you good documentation to enable you to do so, but at the expense of "getting your hands dirty" more often.

Last edited by Jebe; 02-01-2011 at 05:40 PM.
 
  


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