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-   -   Login Keyring? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/login-keyring-824099/)

EarlInLevelland 08-04-2010 06:14 AM

Login Keyring?
 
Hello,

I am nothing if not a Linux newbie, so hope I'm asking this in the right place. I'm using Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and recently started getting a pop-up similar to the following at every boot up:
-----------------------
Login keyring failed
Your login keyring did not succeed.
Enter login keyring here: _______________
-----------------------
That's not [exactly] what it says, but very similar. I should probably add that I have not set up any different 'user profiles' or whatever they're called, but am the only one using this PC...at least, at the present time. Again, this only started a couple of weeks ago and I don't know what I did to start it nor what to do to stop it. I guess it's not extremely painful to have to type my password in every time, but a PITA nevertheless. Any ideas? TIA!

<>< Earl

jasohl 08-04-2010 12:50 PM

Can you provide [exactly] what it says? And does this happen after you log in or before? Or does your account auto-login?
If its the Gnome keyring, it stores passwords, like for wireless and such. You setup a master password which secures the others.
I have seen similar situations when people use auto-login and have wireless setup. In those cases when you start up, wireless tries to connect. The keyring then asks your "permission" to use the wireless password.

tealio 08-04-2010 01:17 PM

Click 'Applications'
Click 'Accessories'
Click 'Passwords and Encryption Keys'

-or-

Press 'ALT-F2'
Then type in 'seahorse'

-then-

Right click 'Passwords: login'
Select 'Change Password'

-then-

Change the password to blank. This will allow autologin to use your wireless password, start remote desktop, etc.

tredegar 08-04-2010 01:29 PM

Earl,

You can set things back to "normal" by going to /home/earl/.gnome2/keyrings and deleting the file default.keyring

Notice the "dot" in the filepath: the .gnome2 directory is "hidden". Go to Places... Home then press <CTRL><h> to make the hidden directories be listed.

I hate these keyring managers (KDE has "wallet") and if I cannot uninstall them, I found that if you enter a blank password, they generally go away after asking "Shall I store the password somewhere?".
If I get burgled I'll have to phone my ISP and set things up again.

EarlInLevelland 08-06-2010 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jasohl (Post 4055784)
Can you provide [exactly] what it says? And does this happen after you log in or before? Or does your account auto-login?
If its the Gnome keyring, it stores passwords, like for wireless and such. You setup a master password which secures the others.
I have seen similar situations when people use auto-login and have wireless setup. In those cases when you start up, wireless tries to connect. The keyring then asks your "permission" to use the wireless password.

I wrote it down this time. The title bar of the window says "Unlock Login Keyring"

First line says "Enter password to unlock your login keyring."

Second line says "The login keyring did not get unlocked when you logged into your computer."

Last line says "Password: ___________________"
Two buttons underneath this say "Cancel" and "OK"

I enter the password I had to set up when installing Ubuntu and press OK. Then everything's fine.

EarlInLevelland 08-06-2010 12:54 PM

Thanks Tealio. I don't know what I just did, but following your steps below appear to have solved the problem. I just rebooted and the pesky box didn't pop up. Those things which I understand about Linux and Ubuntu are still far outweighed by those which I don't. :-) Now to figure out how to mark this problem "Solved"...


Quote:

Originally Posted by tealio (Post 4055809)
Click 'Applications'
Click 'Accessories'
Click 'Passwords and Encryption Keys'

-or-

Press 'ALT-F2'
Then type in 'seahorse'

-then-

Right click 'Passwords: login'
Select 'Change Password'

-then-

Change the password to blank. This will allow autologin to use your wireless password, start remote desktop, etc.


chandramani_yadav 01-20-2012 03:44 PM

i don't see it as solution because it saves password clear text which is security risk.

dizzydan77 05-16-2012 11:48 PM

Workaround for Login Keyring on auto login
 
Another way to get around the 'unlocked key ring' request, without compromising other stored passwords is to create an additional Password Key ring just for the VNC remote login password.

Instead of removing the password for the main Key ring, create a new "Password Keyring" by opening "Passwords and Encryption Keys" from "Applications > Accessories".

Select "File > New..." and click "Password Keyring".
Now just add the VNC Key ring entry to the new Password Keyring folder. This should be something like vino.local:5900. Once you've added the entry, you will need to copy additional attributes into it. The best way to do this, I found, was to copy them from your original keyring file onto the new one you've created. These are located in your home directory under ".gnome\keyrings\*.keyring". Make sure you removed the password for your initial Keyring in "Passwords and Encryption Keys" otherwise you will not be able to read it's contents. Once open, just copy the additional attributes for the 'vino.local:5900' entry (or whatever entry VNC is name under). Add them to the keyring file you just created.

Once this is done, you can go back and assign a password to your main keyring to encrypt its contents again. Do not assign any password to the key ring folder you just created.

By leaving this entry open, the system will be able to retrieve the VNC password when you attempt to login remotely. Once you are in, you can then manually unlock the secure Key ring by right-clicking on it and clicking "unlock".

You can add any entries to this unsecured Keyring folder for anything that is giving you problems on auto-login (wireless network, etc.) while maintaining all other keys secure.

Hope this helps, and if anyone has found a better workaround or any vulnerability in this approach, please feel free to point this out.

dan

Weatherlawyer 09-19-2012 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dizzydan77 (Post 4680508)
... and if anyone has found a better workaround or any vulnerability in this approach, please feel free to point this out.

I have this problem but only with Chrome.
I think itcame as the default browser with this OS (Zorin) which says a lot about Google and security. I dont use it much as I think Googles shouldn't be shaping my searches or storing my search patterns.

And I don't trust them with much else for that matter.

So why is it only happening in Chrome?


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