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Old 08-06-2015, 01:34 PM   #1
AdultFoundry
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List of obsolete Linux commands


I am learning Linux, and I will be going over an extensive list of commands now. I think that some of them may be no longer needed / used and obsolete. Is there any list, at which I could take a look, in order to check for this.

I will indicate that I will need Linux for server administration of my own unmanaged hosting plan. I want to learn it all though, to have a good footing and background. I will be skipping commands like playing midi files and things like that, as this definitely will not be needed, for what I am trying to do. I want be using Linux as the main operating system, I only need it for a hosting plan (any, could be advanced and expensive ones, dedicated).

The commands that I will be going over now are these:

List of Linux commands (not all)

"Not all" means that this is what I am currently working on. This is a list of commands that I have, and I will move on to more, so this is not a complete list of all Linux commands, that exist. This one is quite long, anyway (491 items).

Last edited by AdultFoundry; 08-06-2015 at 01:47 PM.
 
Old 08-06-2015, 01:44 PM   #2
Keruskerfuerst
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Absolutly correct.
 
Old 08-06-2015, 02:32 PM   #3
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdultFoundry View Post
I am learning Linux, and I will be going over an extensive list of commands now.
Wouldn't it be easier to follow an online usage tutorial or read your distribution of choices user and admin documentation I wonder?


Quote:
Originally Posted by AdultFoundry View Post
I think that some of them may be no longer needed / used and obsolete. Is there any list, at which I could take a look, in order to check for this.
One of the commands I recognize as missing is 'doexec' (but that won't hurt you much) another thing is that 'rpm' only works on distros that use RPM package management like Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS, Fedora, SuSE etc, etc (though you probably first will be using front ends like YUM, YAST, DNF or whatever else) and 'apt' only works on Debian(-esque) distros. Most important though from your list are the 'apropos' / 'whatis', 'whereis' and 'which' commands (which, together with 'man' and 'info') will show you meta and practical usage nfo about things:
Code:
 ~]$ apropos yes
yes (1)              - output a string repeatedly until killed
 ~]$ whatis yes
yes (1)              - output a string repeatedly until killed
 ~]$ whereis yes
yes: /usr/bin/yes /usr/share/man/man1/yes.1.gz
 ~]$ which yes
/usr/bin/yes
 ~]$ man yes # use q to quit
 ~]$ man2ascii yes
YES(1)                                                                                                                          User Commands                                                                                                                          YES(1)



NAME
       yes - output a string repeatedly until killed

SYNOPSIS
       yes [STRING]...
       yes OPTION

DESCRIPTION
       Repeatedly output a line with all specified STRING(s), or 'y'.

       --help display this help and exit

       --version
              output version information and exit

       GNU coreutils online help: <http://www.gnu.org/software/coreutils/> Report yes translation bugs to <http://translationproject.org/team/>

AUTHOR
       Written by David MacKenzie.

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright  2013 Free Software Foundation, Inc.  License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>.
       This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.  There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

SEE ALSO
       The full documentation for yes is maintained as a Texinfo manual.  If the info and yes programs are properly installed at your site, the command

              info coreutils 'yes invocation'

       should give you access to the complete manual.



GNU coreutils 8.22
You see it's (esp. in the beginning) easier to know where you can find nfo than to try and learn all nfo. So if one of them commands errors out then the tool either isn't installed or otherwise not accessible:
Code:
 ~]$ which zebra
/usr/bin/which: no zebra in (here)
 ~]$ which hurd
/usr/bin/which: no hurd overthere)
*Both things actually are something, it's just you won't need them anytime soon ;-p



Quote:
Originally Posted by AdultFoundry View Post
I will indicate that I will need Linux for server administration of my own unmanaged hosting plan. I want to learn it all though, to have a good footing and background. I will be skipping commands like playing midi files and things like that, as this definitely will not be needed, for what I am trying to do. I want be using Linux as the main operating system, I only need it for a hosting plan (any, could be advanced and expensive ones, dedicated).
Then especially you should try some tutorials. Note you can load up VMware or Virtualbox on your current machine and safely play with things.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AdultFoundry View Post
"Not all" means that this is what I am currently working on. This is a list of commands that I have, and I will move on to more, so this is not a complete list of all Linux commands, that exist. This one is quite long, anyway (491 items).
If I weed out some I get 133 commands you want to read up on. Note you better do that as unprivileged user as some can irreversibly alter a systems perception of reality. Only use root account when needed and log out again.
Code:
     1  apropos
     2  apt
     3  bash
     4  bzip2
     5  cat
     6  chage
     7  chattr
     8  chgrp
     9  chkconfig
    10  chmod
    11  chown
    12  chpasswd
    13  cp
    14  crond
    15  crontab
    16  cut
    17  date
    18  df
    19  diff
    20  dig
    21  dmesg
    22  du
    23  echo
    24  env
    25  false
    26  file
    27  find
    28  fsck
    29  ftp
    30  ftpd
    31  fuser
    32  gawk
    33  gpg
    34  grep
    35  groupadd
    36  groupdel
    37  groupmod
    38  groups
    39  gunzip
    40  gzip
    41  halt
    42  head
    43  hwclock
    44  id
    45  ifconfig
    46  init
    47  install
    48  ip
    49  iptables
    50  iptables-restore
    51  iptables-save
    52  kill
    53  killall
    54  last
    55  lastb
    56  lastlog
    57  less
    58  lftp
    59  ln
    60  login
    61  logrotate
    62  ls
    63  lsattr
    64  lspci
    65  lsmod
    66  lsusb
    67  mail
    68  mailq
    69  make
    70  man
    71  md5sum
    72  mkdir
    73  mount
    74  mv
    75  netstat
    76  newaliases
    77  nice
    78  passwd
    79  pidof
    80  ping
    81  ps
    82  reboot
    83  renice
    84  rm
    85  rpm
    86  rsync
    87  rsyslogd
    88  runlevel
    89  scp
    90  screen
    91  sed
    92  sftp
    93  sha1sum
    94  shutdown
    95  sort
    96  ssh
    97  ssh-add
    98  ssh-agent
    99  ssh-keygen
   100  sshd
   101  stat
   102  su
   103  sudo
   104  sync
   105  sysctl
   106  tail
   107  tar
   108  tee
   109  telinit
   110  top
   111  traceroute
   112  umount
   113  uname
   114  uniq
   115  unlink
   116  useradd
   117  userdel
   118  usermod
   119  users
   120  vi
   121  vim
   122  wc
   123  wget
   124  whatis
   125  whereis
   126  which
   127  who
   128  whoami
   129  whois
   130  xargs
   131  yes
   132  zcat
   133  zgrep
 
Old 08-06-2015, 02:43 PM   #4
dugan
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Isn't ipconfig deprecated in favor of ip?
 
Old 08-06-2015, 02:47 PM   #5
AdultFoundry
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Thanks for going over these. I am already familiar with most of the things that you mentioned, as I already read 6+ Linux books. I am not learning these commands, but I will be going over all the descriptions, and highlighting what may be useful, for later on (in Word). Like I said, I dont want to limit it for what is needed for web server administration (and lets say email, and ftp), but I dont want to be learning things that are no longer needed, like lets say working on DOS files, which I wont be doing, I would say, although I am not sure, probably not... I was trying to see if there is some kind of info about something like this on the Internet, but probably not (like "Obsolete Linux commands, that are no longer used").

The list is from "Linux in a nutshell", 6th Edition from 2009:

https://www.safaribooksonline.com/li...9780596806088/

All these commands are listed there. They not only describe all the commands, but all the parameters too, and other things, so this is quite extensive. I am making notes, highlighting what is more important, so I can go over it anytime / if needed, and always come back to this. I also remember it now, and where everything would be, as I am reading these books... This may not be necessary, but I want to have a very good foundation for this.

I may print certain pages (lets say up to 200), and try to memorize it, later on (just like I would be learning foreign language words, I am not sure if this is useful, but it can somehow help). I basically want to get into any unmanaged hosting, whatever it would be and do and fix everything by myself. So I guess I would need to understand how things work and are related, and this good foundation is probably a good thing. I dont want to be a server administrator, I am a webmaster, but I need Linux for unmanaged hosting plans, which cost less... Being able to log in, and do everything from the coomand line, would be probably the best too (no WMH / cPanel could be another good thing for this, as I dont have like 200 domains and multiple email accounts now, it would be a matter of setting everything up, like 5 domains lets say, and I can save on cPanel too).

Last edited by AdultFoundry; 08-06-2015 at 02:53 PM.
 
  


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