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Old 03-29-2004, 03:04 PM   #1
Ciaran McCarthy
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Linux: Should/How would I install it?


Okay, here's how it goes...

I don't mind Windows. I'm still running Windows '98 SE and I'm happy with it. But I got a copy of MandrakeMove as a cover CD and I'm impressed with it. Unlike XP, it doesn't seem to choke the system of resources and it looks very cool. It could also be handy if Windows fails to boot.

Right now, I'm seriously considering a partial conversion to Linux. I want to keep my old data and Windows, but... ahh, what's it called... Dual Boot! I want to choose to select either Windows or Linux at startup.

I'm thinking of downloading Mandrake Linux 9.2 (God bless RealDownload).

So here's my questions...

1:) Partitioning the Hard Disk Drive.

If I've to partition the HDD, which file system do I have to choose? Will the install process change it for me? Do I have to set up a different partition for the dual boot? Will this affect my HDD (using Partition Magic)?

2:) Installing Linux.

Is it an easy process? I don't know anyone who uses Linux, so I'm on my own! What would I normally expect from an install of Linux? How will I start it? (Boot disk, DOS, ect.)

3:) Is Mandrake the right move?

Should I install Mandrake? As I said, I used MandrakeMove and it seems like a very good OS, but if it's the wrong move then I don't want to make it.

4:) Root Access.

When I first log into Linux, how do I log in as a Root?


Okay, deep breath. Thanks for any help.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:15 PM   #2
zombyLINUX
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First off...

I would not suggest Mandrake, but that is just because I am a dedicated SuSE user. You can install linux by downloading boot.iso corresponding to the linux version you want. I would suggest SuSE 9.0. If you already have a boot cd for Mandrake, then boot from the cd...

The Installation system should allow you to partition the hardrive (shrinking the size of the windows partition). You should probably allow the system to do this for you, but make sure that it is not fully formatting the entire drive. I am unsure about Mandrake, but for SuSE installation, it uses GRUB or LILO which will allow you to select the OS you boot into. This is already installed with the linux system and no other work should be needed...

When you are installing you will be prompted for the root password, remember this, and you should be able to log in as root fine. However, it is not a good idea to use root because it leaves your system open just like Windows. You should use su (super user). When you install linux you will create a user account for linux. You will use that account to log into linux. Whenver you need to do something that requires root permissions, then you can type su at the prompt, put in the root password, then you have root permissions. I would not worry about this point for now.

I would search for boot.iso. These are images that you make a cd out of to boot. I would then look into ftp install. I would just do an ftp installation. If you have a slow connection, then it may take a while. Post more questions...

I hope I helped at least a little...
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:25 PM   #3
muah
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About which distro to use: I also wouldnt recommend Mandrake (but its my personal opinion) if u really want to understand linux. What I did when I was thinking about starting using linux was that i downloaded trial version of VmWare Workstation and installed several distros to a virtual PC (VmWare creates a virtual machine(s) inside your computer which behaves almost exactly as a normal computer). When I tried Mandrake, RedHat and Debian I decided to use RedHat (on the file server in the office I work at). Later I moved to Slackware bc I just like it more.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:30 PM   #4
Ciaran McCarthy
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Well, I respect your opinion on SuSE. I'm going to check out their site to see what it's like.

With a P4 processor (not HT) which image should I download? There is stuff on axp, i386, ia64, ppc, ppc64 (the processors I suppose).

Also, the HDD has already partitioned into 2 drives, C and D. Will that be covered in the installation process?
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:38 PM   #5
Ciaran McCarthy
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Muah

I also respect your opinion Muah.

That was clever, using a VM on the system. But I wouldn't know how to do something like that, so I need to know which Linux I should install first off.

I'll check out Slackware bc.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:38 PM   #6
Mara
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Re: Linux: Should/How would I install it?

Quote:
Originally posted by Ciaran McCarthy

1) Partitioning the Hard Disk Drive.

If I've to partition the HDD, which file system do I have to choose? Will the install process change it for me? Do I have to set up a different partition for the dual boot? Will this affect my HDD (using Partition Magic)?
Linux can use many filesystems. Two most popular ones are ReiserFS and Ext3. I prefer Reiser, but Ext3 is also good. Mandrake (and other distributions) allow you to choose between them (and some more). For normal user there's no difference. But if you'll ask which one is better there's a big chance for a flame war. :]

The installer can do it for you, but it's better to control the process and choose manual partitioning. The program is easy to use. I don't know if Mandrake Move has DiskDrake, but if it has, it's the same program.

Linux requires minimum 2 partitions: one main (/ or root) and swap. Separate /home (for your personal files, settings etc) is highly recommended.

And yes, if you don't have free space (not attached to any partition), you'd need to resize one of them (or more). Partition Magic can do it, Mandrake installer, too.
Quote:
2) Installing Linux.

Is it an easy process? I don't know anyone who uses Linux, so I'm on my own! What would I normally expect from an install of Linux? How will I start it? (Boot disk, DOS, ect.)
You can start the installation the same way you boot your MandrakeMove (boot cd). Installation is rather easy, you just need to read the questions, but you should be able to answer them without problems.
Stages of instalation: choosing your language, keyboard, mouse etc, partitioning, choosing packages to install, installation of packages, passwords, network configuration, video configuration, bootloader.

Quote:
3) Is Mandrake the right move?

Should I install Mandrake? As I said, I used MandrakeMove and it seems like a very good OS, but if it's the wrong move then I don't want to make it.
Mandrake is popular and that's probably the best recomendation. Regular Mandrake and MandrakeMove are very similar (it's the same version). If you like MDKMove you should like the orginal version.

Last edited by Mara; 03-29-2004 at 03:40 PM.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:43 PM   #7
muah
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Re: Muah

Quote:
Originally posted by Ciaran McCarthy
That was clever, using a VM on the system. But I wouldn't know how to do something like that, so I need to know which Linux I should install first off.

I'll check out Slackware bc.
About VmWare u just download and install VmWare Workstation (just like any other program for windows). And then u will use a Wizard to create a new virtual machine (select OS u will install on it, HDD size, RAM size and so its really easy). In the end u will start your virtual machine (it runs in a window or in fullscreen) and just boots from CD for example to start an installation of operating system. To be honest I admire ppl from VmWare that they were able to code such a program.

About Slackware. If u decide for it u should know u will have to do lots of work manually (it doesnt have nice GUI for almost everything like Mandrake has but u will have total control over the system and u will actually learn how linux works)
 
Old 03-29-2004, 03:49 PM   #8
Ciaran McCarthy
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Hmm... Slackware sounds like too much for me to take on first time.

I'll keep VmWare in mind. It could be useful.

Still undecided about Mandrake.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 04:22 PM   #9
Komakino
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Well here's my two pence - I started with RedHat 5 a few years ago, learned a little, upgraded to 7.2 and was never very happy with it, upgraded to 9 and found it was excellent package-wise but was now overgrown with stuff I would never used.

Then I installed SuSE - and uninstalled it straight away. I COULD NOT STAND IT!!

Now I'm a very satisfied slackware user. I think because I've learned the most since using it and I have pretty much total control over my own system. I've also earned a linux convert in my friend Rich who has started with Knoppix.

Which brings me on to..have you tried Knoppix? Runs from CD but can be installed to your hard disk if you're happy with it. That's what Rich now has and although he's still learning, he's finding it a very rewarding experience.

Your problem is that everyone on here is going to tell you to use what they use. Look at what you posted - that you were thinking of Mandrake. Then look at the VERY first response telling you to forget Mandrake and use SuSE because that's what they use. I would say stick with what you were originally gonna try. If you listen to everyone you'll be bouncing around distributions forever whilst everyone tells you theirs is the best. Try Mandrake - if you don't like it then try something else. You can only learn from your own mistakes.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 04:39 PM   #10
kooch
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"P4 processor (not HT) which image should I download? There is stuff on axp, i386, ia64, ppc, ppc64 (the processors I suppose)."

You'll want to download the i386 image for a Pentium 4.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 04:59 PM   #11
beejayzed
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Ciaran McCarthy,
Don't worry, just chill.
I was in your situation a few months ago, knew noone who had linux etc.
The Mandrake installation preocess is simple, you don't need to know anything about linux to be succesful with it ( I'm living proof).
When it comes to partitioning, you can do it with the Mandrake installer. I would suggest you create an extended partition and put the linux logical partition in that. The reason why I say this is because it's the only way I've gotten windows and linux to live together happily.
The Mandrake partition manager(the one in the installer) has the ability to resize partitions and create extended ones. You'll have to resize your current windows partition and then create an extended on next to it(on the right). At first I couldn't see how to do that, you can choose an extended partition with the "type" option.
In the extended partition you'll probably want create a partition with the reiserfs or ext3, both journaling file systems. I would suggest reiserfs, it's faster.
When I intalled Mandrake, it automatically added a windows entry to the bootloader.
I hope this post helps you.
And yes , I've used Mandrakde for 4 months now and I love it, definitely good for newbies like you and me.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 05:32 PM   #12
beejayzed
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Just an extension of my 2 cents.He he. When I started writing my post there was only one reply. I got interrupted and posted it about 35 minutes later and theres lost of other replies, but I hope my post helps you choose.

I guess I love Mandrake coz the first time I installed it, I didn't NEED to find a help forum! My hardware worked flawlessly, it impressed me (that's why I suggest you try it). I didn't have any problems. I was just feeling a round in the darkness while the light was becoming brighter (and it still is). I was thinking of trying Slackware but I want to get my feet in first, then I'll spread them.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 07:12 PM   #13
webwolf11
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I just installed RedHat 9 last week as my first attempt at Linux, (after using windows for almost 10 years) and I like it so far, I can't tell if it's better than other versions for a beginner or not, but at least I didn't get stuck on any of the instalation steps.

Right now im working on how to set up Linux to do everything I can do on Windows, and Im finding it very challenging ( I aim to use Linux as my main OS and leave windows behind). Anyway I would listen to Komakino and try the version you have in hands and then go from there.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 07:54 PM   #14
donlinux
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tips from a newbie

I'm still a newbie. I installed mandrake 8.2 with no problems, upgraded to 9.0 with no problems, then I decided to try RedHat because of the ease of installing rpm's. Had virtually no problems installing redhat, it automatically partiioned my hd and set up dual boot for me. I'm now using fedora 1 and am extremely pleased with the ease of use and ease of upgrading. No matter which distro you decide upon, there is a steep learning curve with linux. Thankfully, forums like this one exist and for the most part if you do your research first, you will get very good help here.
 
Old 03-29-2004, 08:48 PM   #15
syahid
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yes you should install it
 
  


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