LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-04-2007, 06:48 PM   #1
w0lv3rin3
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Barrie, ON
Distribution: Slackware 9.1, 10.0, 10.1, 11.0
Posts: 102

Rep: Reputation: 15
LINUX Partition SETUP


hello fellahs, how you doin?

I wanna install Slackware 11

whats a good partition setup I should go along with, ney good suggestions would be nice, ill take into my consideration.

right now I am focusing on the following.

80 gig hdd

/swap = 2 gig
/boot = 3 gig
/usr = 5 gig
/tmp = 5 gig
/ = 65 gig

or is this a bad partition setup.

I plan on using my linux machine as a personal workstation



I also plan on doing a setup on a 130 gig SATA on a different machine; ney good suggestions on a partition setup; thx
 
Old 02-04-2007, 06:55 PM   #2
knockout_artist
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: fedora core 9
Posts: 324

Rep: Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by w0lv3rin3
hello fellahs, how you doin?

I wanna install Slackware 11

whats a good partition setup I should go along with, ney good suggestions would be nice, ill take into my consideration.

right now I am focusing on the following.

80 gig hdd

/swap = 2 gig
/boot = 3 gig
/usr = 5 gig
/tmp = 5 gig
/ = 65 gig

or is this a bad partition setup.

I plan on using my linux machine as a personal workstation



I also plan on doing a setup on a 130 gig SATA on a different machine; ney good suggestions on a partition setup; thx

Yeah you are right its a bad partition table.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 06:58 PM   #3
w0lv3rin3
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Barrie, ON
Distribution: Slackware 9.1, 10.0, 10.1, 11.0
Posts: 102

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
feel like helpin me out, this is y i posted it.

any recommendations?
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:11 PM   #4
saikee
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Distribution: Any free distro.
Posts: 3,398
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 112Reputation: 112
I run Slackware 10.0, 10.2 and 11.

The first two are each in a single 5Gb partition.

The third one is in a 200Gb Sata with which I could have only 15 partitions so I standardised mainly 20Gb partition each and Slackware is in one of them.

I have one 1Gb swap used by all Linux and assign only one partition for each distro.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:16 PM   #5
mikieboy
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Warrington, Cheshire, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 12 LXDE
Posts: 555

Rep: Reputation: 33
/boot only needs to be big enough to hold the boot files, say 500Mb would be loads of space. This partition is best at the beginning of the drive
then / can be next and can be as big as you like but 10 to 15 gig is plenty
/swap should be twice your physical RAM but no bigger than 2 gig
/usr and /temp at 5 gig is probably overkill but if you've got the space then OK
Most importantly, you should have a separate /home to protect your data in the event of a system problem. The size of this can be as big as you like and should reflect the kind of files you are likely to create.
Some recommend a separate /var to prevent buffer overflows and this could be 3 to 5 gig.

This is my opinion and I'm sure you'll get differing ones, I hope it helps.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:17 PM   #6
w0lv3rin3
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Barrie, ON
Distribution: Slackware 9.1, 10.0, 10.1, 11.0
Posts: 102

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
/boot = 1 gig
/swap = 2 gig
/ = 15 gig
/usr = 3 gig
/temp = 3 gig
/var = 5 gig
/home = remaining disk space
this is all I need for a standalone linux machie?

Last edited by w0lv3rin3; 02-04-2007 at 07:21 PM.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:37 PM   #7
knockout_artist
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: fedora core 9
Posts: 324

Rep: Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by w0lv3rin3
/boot = 1 gig
/swap = 2 gig
/ = 15 gig
/usr = 3 gig
/temp = 3 gig
/var = 5 gig

this is all I need for a standalone linux machie?
as this other guy said boot partition need not be huge.
only partition you need to big is either
/
or /usr or say you want to mount you home directory on a partition.

like my suse partitions were

/ = 4 gig for installation and file system: /boot /usr /tmp ever thing is hare.
/data =5 gig all my codes download software goes here.

=====================================================================

then I changed it to

/ = same as above
/champ all my data went here I actually just change name of /data into /champ making it my home directory


I hope I helped.
I am at work so first time I coulndn't explain the who thing.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:43 PM   #8
knockout_artist
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: fedora core 9
Posts: 324

Rep: Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy
/boot only needs to be big enough to hold the boot files, say 500Mb would be loads of space. This partition is best at the beginning of the drive
then / can be next and can be as big as you like but 10 to 15 gig is plenty
/swap should be twice your physical RAM but no bigger than 2 gig
/usr and /temp at 5 gig is probably overkill but if you've got the space then OK
Most importantly, you should have a separate /home to protect your data in the event of a system problem. The size of this can be as big as you like and should reflect the kind of files you are likely to create.
Some recommend a separate /var to prevent buffer overflows and this could be 3 to 5 gig.

This is my opinion and I'm sure you'll get differing ones, I hope it helps.

Sorry I didnt read this post before. w0lv3rin3 do as this post.

Only IF you will be doing kernel development you may want to change /boot into say about 1 gig.
I have so many bzImage-s in my /boot directory. Still I say 500mb is enough.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:48 PM   #9
Emerson
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Location: Saint Amant, Acadiana
Distribution: Gentoo ~arch
Posts: 5,872

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
My /boot is 15 MB, I have some kernels there, about 50% is free ...
2 GB swap does not make any sense, with 512 MB or more of RAM swap is practically not needed.
However, for a personal workstation I'd go with just two partitions.
swap - 100 MB
/ - rest of HDD
 
Old 02-05-2007, 12:15 AM   #10
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
Swap 1GB
/ 8GB
data 40GB or more--preferably on a different physical drive. Mount this to a directory (eg "data") inside /home/username

KISS
 
Old 02-05-2007, 08:18 AM   #11
Emerson
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Location: Saint Amant, Acadiana
Distribution: Gentoo ~arch
Posts: 5,872

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
pixellany

What is the philosophy behind that 1 GB swap partition?
 
Old 02-05-2007, 08:25 AM   #12
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerson
pixellanyWhat is the philosophy behind that 1 GB swap partition?
There is nothing rational about it--my reading says that it will be enough, and it is a small enough percentage of my total drive space that I don't feel it is wasted.

I guess you could say the philosophy is that I don't want to invest a lot of time figuring out the "right" swap size.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 09:48 AM   #13
saikee
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Distribution: Any free distro.
Posts: 3,398
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 112Reputation: 112
I favour an easy way to remember the partition table. Believe me if you ever have to rebuild one you will not want every partition specified to a fraction of a Gb.

The last hard disk I bought cost GBP102 for a 500Gb unit. The difference between 1Gb and 0.1Gb is 18p, hardly enough to buy anything when a local newspaper retails at 42p.

I got a feeling the swap size of twice the ram size was written when we could only afford 128Mb or 256Mb. As 1Gb or 2Gb are common and affordable the swap size is getting less critical. I find it convenient to round off everything to the nearest Gb.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 05:08 PM   #14
w0lv3rin3
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Barrie, ON
Distribution: Slackware 9.1, 10.0, 10.1, 11.0
Posts: 102

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
thank you all for your support, it helped me greatly; u guys are the best :P
 
Old 02-06-2007, 12:06 PM   #15
bskrakes
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Canada, Alberta
Distribution: RHEL 4 and up, CentOS 5.x, Fedora Core 5 and up, Ubuntu 8 and up
Posts: 251

Rep: Reputation: 32
Thumbs up

From one friend to another - I have a friend who gave me this advice.... hopefully it helps! There may be some things that apply to your distro and some that don't. I am not that familiar with slack ware but imagine that the info you read below will help you in deciding how you would partition any linux/UNIX system.

The very first thing you will want to look into and learn is the
Logical Volume Manager (LVM). This makes the initial disk setup a
little more complicated but it makes things so much more flexible.
Take a look at www.tldp.org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/index.html if you
are not already familar with it.

Some people just create a small /boot partitition and throw all the
rest in / (root). I usually like to partition a bit more as it makes
backups a little more granular, plus it allows for some security
options for certain partitions at mount time. The choice of throwing
all the space into the root filesystem is usually made because the
admin is not really sure which areas of the disk are going to need the
space. With LVM you can add and remove storage around the logical
volumes at will.

/ (root) - Either small root and larger /usr or just a large root,
30-40 gigs. See /usr

/boot - make this small. 25 - 50 megs is plenty

/tmp - 200-500 megs is decent for normal ops. Definately a separate
partition for security (see below)

/usr - maybe. I used to make this a separate partition for the
installed software, and make root small, 200 megs or so. Now I usually
just make a large root partitition, 30-40 gigs.

/var and /home - one of these two will be your larger partitition,
depending on setup. For example, your production server stores all web
site files and stuff in /home. They should both be separate partitions
for security (See below). Either split remaining space between the two
or paritition how you think they would best be utilized.

swap - yup, double ram is a good guideline

Here is one I have partitioned, with /home being the larger consumer:

Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/vg0-root 28G 9.1G 19G 33% /
/dev/mapper/vg0-tmp 245M 54M 178M 24% /tmp
/dev/sda1 16M 13M 2.2M 86% /boot
/dev/mapper/vg0-home 293G 129G 164G 45% /home

There is one volume group and three logical volumes. I don't make
/boot part of the logical volume.

The logical volumes are the equivalent to partitions...with LVM I
usually create logical volumes whose size adds up to much less that
the full disk. For example, on the server above I left about 75 gigs
unallocatted, which I can then tack on to any logical volume if it
needs more space.

Forgot about the security possibilities with separate partitions:

/tmp - Any user on the system can write to this, including someone who
breaks in through, say, a buggy script (PHPBB has been notorious for
this). They will try to drop executable files into /tmp, since they
can write to it as the apache user. I mount /tmp with the noexec and
nosuid options, which disables executing programs and disabled set-uid
for anything in /tmp

/home - Consider mounting nosuid, might cause problems with some
programs though.


There this is from my friend and I hope it helps.... let me know what you think!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Partition Setup bobby_hawk Slackware 14 12-31-2005 01:02 PM
Best Partition Setup - new linux user xanas3712 Linux - Newbie 4 04-30-2004 04:36 AM
partition setup cxtech Slackware 4 03-05-2004 02:30 AM
Help with setup/partition Netrack Linux - General 7 01-15-2003 09:39 PM
Can I use partition magic to setup linux Gene126 Linux - General 8 08-15-2002 10:28 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:11 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration