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Old 12-19-2010, 12:32 AM   #1
Electodemon
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Linux Newbie - Epicly...


Ok. I am 16 and tired of windows.
My plan is to hopefully work for the government as a whitehat hacker...
I have heard through my research that the Linux is a good way to begin learning to hack.
I assure you all that I do not have any intent of hacking anyones computer except for the tower I have set up...
I doubt you believe me on that fact but ...
Anyways... what would be the best way to start learning to hack using Linux?
 
Old 12-19-2010, 12:49 AM   #2
Dark_Helmet
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I can't help you much beyond a couple general pointers.

1. Be careful of your terminology. Some people get their digital underpants in a bunch if you use the word "hacking" to describe intrusion. There are purists that define "hacking" as taking code for existing software and changing it to fix a bug, customize it for a particular purpose, or to add features. Those same purists use the term "cracking" to mean gaining entry to a remote system by using password attacks or using some other sort of exploit. Personally, I couldn't care less which term is used, because you can tell from the context of the discussion. But beware the lectures of the purists...

2. If you want to be a whitehat, then go to security forums. Read articles and discussions. You'll gain insight on how a black hat thinks and what strategies blackhats employ. You'll also want to learn how to read code, because exploits are almost always centered around poor/insecure coding styles. If you cannot read code, you cannot identify potential weaknesses. Similarly, a strong knowledge of mathematics would help if you have an interest in knowing how encryption works.

3. You may not find that being a whitehat is all that exciting or glorious. Just like anything else, it will take a good deal of studying and analysis to do well. Far more research, analysis, and planning than actual coding or action.

4. The forum rules do not allow users to specifically help someone crack/exploit anything. So you will not find any specific assistance here. And likely not on many other forums. Learning this skill is likely a "journey of one" so to speak.

Last edited by Dark_Helmet; 12-19-2010 at 12:51 AM.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 12:52 AM   #3
Electodemon
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Thank you for the info.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 01:35 AM   #4
rahulkya
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to be a whitehat hacker the best distribution is backtrack, download and explore it. Another one is weakerthan ....Enjoy exploring.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 08:27 AM   #5
teebones
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark_Helmet View Post
I can't help you much beyond a couple general pointers.

1. Be careful of your terminology. Some people get their digital underpants in a bunch if you use the word "hacking" to describe intrusion. There are purists that define "hacking" as taking code for existing software and changing it to fix a bug, customize it for a particular purpose, or to add features. Those same purists use the term "cracking" to mean gaining entry to a remote system by using password attacks or using some other sort of exploit. Personally, I couldn't care less which term is used, because you can tell from the context of the discussion. But beware the lectures of the purists...
Wrong, he did it correctly, even for purists. Whitehat vs blackhat. Good intentional vs criminal intent.
Cracking is not the same as hacking. Cracking is alteration of code in a fixed way. (e.g. no-cd cracks, keygens etc)

Hacking is about security measures/antimeasures depending on the type of hacker , computer related or telephony related. Hackers work with live data.
Blackhat hackers, try to bypass security for their own gain (criminal intention), like extortion, stealing data that kind.
Whitehat hackers, try to bypass security for common good (good intention), like warn companies for security leaks which could be abused by blackhats etc..

Last edited by teebones; 12-19-2010 at 08:29 AM.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 11:00 AM   #6
katto
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Although I don't believe that whitehats, especially governmental ones are more "white" than regular blackhats I'll go along. Since you want to start from linux, this is a good way to learn the structure of *nix OSes. Try to use the command line to do everything for a couple of months while reading books on linux. This is going to be tough at first but you will either learn how to do things or do nothing at all.

The second part is to learn how to code. A lot of people recommend learning some practical language first like Python but C is essential if you want to be a good coder. When you start to get the hang of things start reading up on ASM. If you are going to write exploits someday you are going to need to have a good understanding of it, at the very least you have to be able to read ASM. Add some web languages like HTML, javascript and PHP. If you are focused on "hacking" all this is going to get very boring and you are going to give up. You will have to learn to like the process of coding for the sake of it, not for the outcome you want.

The third part is to read up on networking. Read up on the IP suite and understand the structure. You don't have to memorize everything, just get the hang of how it works and you can refer back to books when you need it. Again it's going to be boring unless you have a fascination with these things.

The fourth part is to work on some mathematical knowledge. If you are still in school pay attention, it's useful. If you want to understand cryptography at some point you will need some maths. That doesn't mean you cannot read up on cryptography right now. Find some introductory books and start, it's easier than it sounds. When you get to advanced topics that you cannot understand then look for what is missing from your knowledge and work on it.

In general you have to read stuff all the time. After you have a good knowledge base then you can go on reading books on IT security, exploiting, auditing etc. The main enemy is not going to be difficulty but boredom. Writing small programs that do nothing can be very disappointing if you're set on distant goals.


Quote:
Originally Posted by teebones View Post
Wrong, he did it correctly, even for purists. Whitehat vs blackhat. Good intentional vs criminal intent.
Cracking is not the same as hacking. Cracking is alteration of code in a fixed way. (e.g. no-cd cracks, keygens etc)

Hacking is about security measures/antimeasures depending on the type of hacker , computer related or telephony related. Hackers work with live data.
Blackhat hackers, try to bypass security for their own gain (criminal intention), like extortion, stealing data that kind.
Whitehat hackers, try to bypass security for common good (good intention), like warn companies for security leaks which could be abused by blackhats etc..
You are arguing from the modern standpoint about these terms. The meaning of those words has evolved over time. In the original university hacker culture of the 70s the word "hacker" had the meaning that the word "coder" has today (almost). Essentially a hacker was the guy that did smart things that others hadn't thought of doing using code (or not only code, lets put the phreaks here are well). The 80s press had a lot to do with the change as it used the word hacker to denote "dangerous" individuals with IT skills that spread chaos and mischief after various high profile intrusions became known. There was a sort of hacker scare going on. The community tried to defend the purity of the word hacker by inventing cracker while the truth is that both sides (if there really were two sides) were parts of the same hacker culture. Eventually the more accurate -in terms of belonging to a specific group- term emerged, the whitehat/blackhat hacker. By that time though the meaning had departed from that of the coder/skilled programmer/computer geek to that of the skilled individual in IT which is intent on intrusion and bypassing of security. That wasn't the objective of the original hackers, or at least bypassing security wasn't the only one or even the main one. Refer to the jargon file for details.

Now that I think more of it, think of how the the word "reverser" turned into "cracker" complete with negative connotations.
 
Old 12-20-2010, 06:45 AM   #7
Electodemon
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Thank you guys very much. I found your information very insightfull and am actually going to look into some of these things. I already know a little bit of 'C' and a small, small amount of 'C++'... python I am trying to learn but need to get a better book for it.
Do any of you guys have any books to recommend on any of the subjects stated above?
 
Old 12-20-2010, 09:16 AM   #8
MTK358
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You can search for "Python Tutorial" and find many great tutorials online.

And about Linux, read the LinuxCommand tutorial linked to in my sig. Also, I strongly recomment anyone to read this before switching to Linux: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...5rT5ue28yaL0aw.

As for the distro, I think Mint is a nice chioce for beginners.
 
Old 12-20-2010, 10:37 AM   #9
lupusarcanus
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- Familiarize yourself with all computing basics. Wikipedia things like 'CPU'. You may think you know everything about a CPU, but you'd be surprised.
- Understand the hacker mindset. Become resourceful and independent. A good place to start is Google.
- Learn as much about Linux as possible. Become a master with it. Read as much of the man pages as possible.
- Learn BASH programming. It's the de facto default shell on most Linux distros.
- Learn about Windows. It's 90%+ market share.
- Learn how to use CMD.EXE. It's pretty small and limited compared to Linux, so it shouldn't take much time. But it's very useful for hacking.
- Build your own computer. Fairly easy, but ROI is high.
- Learn about special hacking programs on Linux. nmap, aircrack-ng, metasploit, etc...
- Learn Python, C/C++ programming and then expand to Ruby and others. In that order.
- Study security topics, and test different penetration methods on your own PCs. Use your own PCs and avoid major legal trouble.
- Get certified. RHCE is an example.
- Use certification to get job.

IMHO, good blueprint to start out with...
 
Old 12-20-2010, 10:49 AM   #10
brianL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leopard View Post
- Familiarize yourself with all computing basics. Wikipedia things like 'CPU'. You may think you know everything about a CPU, but you'd be surprised.
- Understand the hacker mindset. Become resourceful and independent. A good place to start is Google.
- Learn as much about Linux as possible. Become a master with it. Read as much of the man pages as possible.
- Learn BASH programming. It's the de facto default shell on most Linux distros.
- Learn about Windows. It's 90%+ market share.
- Learn how to use CMD.EXE. It's pretty small and limited compared to Linux, so it shouldn't take much time. But it's very useful for hacking.
- Build your own computer. Fairly easy, but ROI is high.
- Learn about special hacking programs on Linux. nmap, aircrack-ng, metasploit, etc...
- Learn Python, C/C++ programming and then expand to Ruby and others. In that order.
- Study security topics, and test different penetration methods on your own PCs. Use your own PCs and avoid major legal trouble.
- Get certified. RHCE is an example.
- Use certification to get job.

IMHO, good blueprint to start out with...
OK, that takes care of tomorrow morning. What shall I do in the afternoon?
 
Old 12-20-2010, 09:45 PM   #11
Electodemon
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Registered: Dec 2010
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Thank you guys so much,
I am seriously going to use this information
And to think.... just 4 days ago I had believed there was no such thing as helpful people in the world.
Thank's a billion guys.
 
  


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