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Old 02-18-2008, 06:34 AM   #1
ashim.bansal
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Cool Linux Hard link


Dear Friends,

As you must be knowing that when you create a hardlink of any file in linux both files show same info.

If we have to see which of the two files where created first then we donot way to see that because the time shown by both files is also same.


Can anybody please tell me is there any way where we can see which of these files where created first.
 
Old 02-18-2008, 07:35 AM   #2
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashim.bansal View Post
Can anybody please tell me is there any way where we can see which of these files where created first.
Directly using 'debugfs' or equivalent tools? No. With the help of "circumstantial evidence" like one's shell history? Yes. If it was logged and still within $HISTSIZE range.

Last edited by unSpawn; 02-18-2008 at 08:27 AM.
 
Old 02-18-2008, 08:15 AM   #3
pixellany
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I would think that one answer would be: "There are not two files." There are simply two pathways to the same file.
 
Old 02-18-2008, 08:29 AM   #4
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
two pathways to the same file.
Short and to the point. Markings of the qualitatively better answer.
 
Old 02-19-2008, 03:30 AM   #5
ashim.bansal
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Thanks for your replies.
As for my knowledge is concerned I think these are not two pathways for same files, as if I delete one file other still exits without any problem. So That means these are two different files.

Still waiting for more appropriate replies.
 
Old 02-19-2008, 03:59 AM   #6
IBall
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No.

A "file" occupies an area of storage (ie hard disk space). A filename is a link that points to that area. If you create a hard link to the file, you are creating an additional file name for the same file. The file itself is only actually deleted when all the links to it are removed.

--Ian
 
Old 02-19-2008, 05:27 AM   #7
ajaydubey
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hardlink issue

dear ashim
you allredy check with stat filename command and it show the same inode number for both file . that why it not two diffrent file
 
Old 02-19-2008, 08:58 AM   #8
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashim.bansal View Post
Still waiting for more appropriate replies.
What does this mean? Are you waiting for someone to tell you that it works the way you have imagined?

"appropriate" to me means that the answer is directly relevant to the question and is correct. It does not have to be a complete anwser. Everyone here has given you appropriate answers.

Try an experiment: create two links to a file--one hard and one soft. Then delete the original file. Now try and open each link.

Another: Make multiple hard links to a file and then run df to see how disk space is being used.

Last edited by pixellany; 02-19-2008 at 09:00 AM.
 
  


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