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$u$hil_k$ 12-14-2012 10:53 AM

LINUX from scratch to Mastering
 
Hello Guys, it may be a bit odd that am asking as in "How to MASTER LINUX from scratch" because the curriculum stream in which we study LINUX/UNIX in college is no way matching the real BLEND of the LINUX is what i believe from my perspective and all i feel is that me knowing the different commands and there working without having the knowledge of using at what time is of no use.

So kindly guys if u have no issues please guide me in a right way to MASTER my skills in LINUX and i even know LINUX is a OCEAN so please direct me in a right way so that i wont get into a whrilpool ;).

kaivai 12-14-2012 11:53 AM

I'm learning linux on my own so I don't know if this will help you at all, but I've found the Linux Documentation Project really helpful.
http://www.tldp.org/

The site takes a little getting used to as far as navigation goes, but some of the books are really great!

markush 12-14-2012 12:00 PM

Hi,

if I understand you correctly (other than the threadtitle suggests because "Linux from Scratch" is a Linux distribution ;) ) you want to learn the basics of Linux, which means those things which do not depend on a single distribution but are common for any Linux.

I's suggest that you install Slackware, it is the most "unixlike" distribution and you learn much about "how Linux really works". We have a very helpful and knowledgeable community here at LQ http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/

Also you may want to look at our SlackDocs http://docs.slackware.com/start

Slackware comes with all packages "vanilla" this means there are no distributionspecific patches to any software, everything works right as the manpages say.

Markus

shivaa 12-14-2012 01:34 PM

You're right! What is taught in colleges and what we do in practical environment are far apart. Well, just by reading theory you cannot become a master. But it will take a lot of hard work and time to become a master of it.

Anyway, there's one book I know, which is written in a different approach & will be really helpful for a beginner like you.

Title: Unix Concepts and Applications
Author: Sumitbha Das

In addition to referring this book, you can download (ofcourse for free) Ubuntu or any free linux distribution. Install it side-by-side or in dual booting of your PC. Keep reading, keep practicing!

Also you can go through online guides (click here) by TLDP, which is a treasure of knowledge.

malak33 12-14-2012 01:51 PM

i would reccommend looking at installing Arch, if you can install Arch you will have a greater understanding of Linux. Their wiki is great.
I would also reccomnd Michael Jang's Red Hat book. It has done myself wonders. Search for it on Amazon. Other websites that have helped me are http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php
and http://www.howtoforge.com/ just to name a few.

TobiSGD 12-14-2012 01:57 PM

1. Install one of the distributions with steeper learning curve, like Slackware, Arch or one of the source based distributions.
2. Do anything with your new OS. If there is something that you can't achieve don't just do it on Windows, learn your ways how to do it on Linux. This can be pretty annoying in the beginning, but you will become proficient with the system much quicker.
3. Learn the commandline and shell scripting. Go to the documentation sites already mentioned and learn, look at http://linux.2038bug.com/rute-home.html. This will make it much easier for you, if you do want to know how something is done on your system just look at it.
4. Set yourself goals to achieve. Try to setup services for different purposes, like setting up a web-server, a file-server or what ever else you want. Tinker with your system and try to shape it the way you want, there are (almost) no limits.
5. If you are done with the first three points and are up for a challenge try Linux From Scratch to learn the nuts and bolts of a Linux system.

Also, always keep this in mind: Read, try, ask.

And don't forget to make backups, once you start to tinker with the system you will break it. ;)

$u$hil_k$ 12-14-2012 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TobiSGD (Post 4849453)
1. Install one of the distributions with steeper learning curve, like Slackware, Arch or one of the source based distributions.
2. Do anything with your new OS. If there is something that you can't achieve don't just do it on Windows, learn your ways how to do it on Linux. This can be pretty annoying in the beginning, but you will become proficient with the system much quicker.
3. Learn the commandline and shell scripting. Go to the documentation sites already mentioned and learn, look at http://linux.2038bug.com/rute-home.html. This will make it much easier for you, if you do want to know how something is done on your system just look at it.
4. Set yourself goals to achieve. Try to setup services for different purposes, like setting up a web-server, a file-server or what ever else you want. Tinker with your system and try to shape it the way you want, there are (almost) no limits.
5. If you are done with the first three points and are up for a challenge try Linux From Scratch to learn the nuts and bolts of a Linux system.

Also, always keep this in mind: Read, try, ask.

And don't forget to make backups, once you start to tinker with the system you will break it. ;)

Thanks a lot sir i will practice with dedication and also enjoying it..! :)

$u$hil_k$ 12-14-2012 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shivaa (Post 4849436)
You're right! What is taught in colleges and what we do in practical environment are far apart. Well, just by reading theory you cannot become a master. But it will take a lot of hard work and time to become a master of it.

Anyway, there's one book I know, which is written in a different approach & will be really helpful for a beginner like you.

Title: Unix Concepts and Applications
Author: Sumitbha Das

In addition to referring this book, you can download (ofcourse for free) Ubuntu or any free linux distribution. Install it side-by-side or in dual booting of your PC. Keep reading, keep practicing!

Also you can go through online guides (click here) by TLDP, which is a treasure of knowledge.

The same book got me into LINUX/UNIX Bro...!

---------- Post added 12-14-12 at 10:19 PM ----------

Quote:

Originally Posted by markush (Post 4849389)
Hi,

if I understand you correctly (other than the threadtitle suggests because "Linux from Scratch" is a Linux distribution ;) ) you want to learn the basics of Linux, which means those things which do not depend on a single distribution but are common for any Linux.

I's suggest that you install Slackware, it is the most "unixlike" distribution and you learn much about "how Linux really works". We have a very helpful and knowledgeable community here at LQ http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/

Also you may want to look at our SlackDocs http://docs.slackware.com/start

Slackware comes with all packages "vanilla" this means there are no distributionspecific patches to any software, everything works right as the manpages say.

Markus

Thank You Sir...!

shivaa 12-15-2012 01:25 AM

Got one more link for you on LQ itself:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ks-4175433508/

So I hope we've showed you that way, now step forward... Have good luck! :)

rabirk 12-17-2012 07:05 PM

This is a question I've had, as well, and I've been trying to learn Linux for about eight months now. I have Mark Sobell's "A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming," and some other books, but this and others don't seem very logically presented. It seems like a good way to "learn" Linux is to start with learning some basic commands, for which there are many sources -- Sobell's book and just about any Linux resource -- and then to get familiar with some of the startup and configuration files: .bash_profile, .bashrc, /etc/bashrc, .bash_login, /.profile, etc. For this, Sobell's book is decent. I am also finding "Unix and Linux System Administration Handbook" to be helpful, but I've yet to find any logically presented guide for learning Linux in an orderly manner. Working through the "Linux from Scratch" project and its recommended reading might work, but I haven't gotten very far with it yet.

markush 12-18-2012 12:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rabirk (Post 4851297)
... Working through the "Linux from Scratch" project and its recommended reading might work, but I haven't gotten very far with it yet.

As I wrote above, "Linux from Scratch" is a Linux distribution (for very advanced users).

Did you take a look at this site http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

When you want to learn Linux you should use Linux, this will help ;)

Markus

rabirk 12-18-2012 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markush (Post 4851459)
As I wrote above, "Linux from Scratch" is a Linux distribution (for very advanced users).

Did you take a look at this site http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

When you want to learn Linux you should use Linux, this will help ;)

Markus


Looking at the "Linux From Scratch" website, I read, "Linux From Scratch (LFS) is a project that provides you with step-by-step instructions for building your own customized Linux system entirely from source."

To me, that does not sound like a distribution. The website, http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/, links to a lot of information about how Linux works. Reading through it can be of use to anybody wanting to learn Linux.

markush 12-19-2012 12:19 AM

In so far you are right, after building Linux from Scratch you would be an expert.

But you would have a less steep learning curve if you simply use any Linux distribution and try to find out why it works like it works.

Markus


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