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Old 05-23-2011, 03:42 AM   #1
gardenair
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Linux Flavor for old pc


Hi,
I have a old computer with 256 MB ram with one Giga processor and Red Hat linux 9 is running in it. I have made this system just to test purposes. Due to some bugs issues in red hat 9 (Which have been expired many years ago) I want to install a new flavor in my old machines which have all server capabilities as well.
Kindly guide me that which one Linux distribution should in install in the old machine.

thanks
garden
 
Old 05-23-2011, 04:06 AM   #2
TobiSGD
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Almost every Linux has server capabilities. If you only want to run that machine as server (without GUI) it doesn't matter which distribution you choose. If you want to run a GUI on that machine than use a lightweight DE, like LXDE, Enlightenment or XFCE, or a simple WM like one of the *boxes, IceWM, FVWM or JWM.
Use distro you are already familiar with.
 
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:44 AM   #3
wpeckham
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Linux for old PC

You will get the best results with a distribution that is minimal. You might check Distrowatch, or use one that is very general,and gives you good control over what you install (Debian). The point is to only install what you need, a fairly minimal system.

If you are using it as a server, try to avoid installing X (X-Windows, X-org, gnome, kde, etc) entirely.
 
Old 05-23-2011, 11:17 AM   #4
DavidMcCann
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If you're used to Red Hat, stick with it by using CentOS: modern Red Hat without the support bill. If you do a text-based install (the anaconda installer won't run in 256MB) and don't install X, it should be fine.

Salix is another possibility. It will run in 256MB even if you do use the GUI, and the installer gives the option for a core install: no GUI, no software. Since it's based on Slackware, it's very stable.

Thirdly, Debian.
 
Old 05-23-2011, 11:24 AM   #5
moxieman99
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If there is any way you can add more RAM to your system (check out your motherboard specs), do so. Getting up to 512 meg of ram would really help both your available distro choices and the stability of the system you ultimately create.
 
Old 05-23-2011, 11:31 AM   #6
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moxieman99 View Post
If there is any way you can add more RAM to your system (check out your motherboard specs), do so. Getting up to 512 meg of ram would really help both your available distro choices and the stability of the system you ultimately create.
Can you explain to me in which way the amount of available RAM affects the stability of the system?
 
  


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