LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-07-2005, 05:10 AM   #1
furby528
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Distribution: Currently Finding Suitable Distro
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
Question Linux File System? Whats that?


Hi,

When I'm installing Linux, I found that there are many types of file systems Linux have(E.g. Ext3 and so on), which is quite similar to Windows (E.g. Fat32, NTFS and so on). So whats the different between each of them?

One last thing, which is better or recommended? MEPIS and SUSE? (In term of user-friendly, functions, Hardware Compatibility and so on). You see, its my first time working with linux.

Thanks.

Ah another thing, I have only one Hard Disk and I want to have dual boot(Linux and Win XP). So is it ok to partition the drive into 2 and install?

Last edited by furby528; 12-07-2005 at 05:14 AM.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 05:23 AM   #2
vangelis
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Location: Hellas
Distribution: Zenwalk 6.4
Posts: 337
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 30
if you want to know the difference between each of them it would take long one thing needed to know is that you don't have to defragment anymore with a linux file system, you should start with ext2.

And last in term of user friendly and hw compatibility you should definetely go to SuSE
 
Old 12-07-2005, 05:37 AM   #3
muha
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: xubuntu, grml
Posts: 451

Rep: Reputation: 37
For a dual boot just partition and install suse when you already have windows installed.
I went for Reiser filesystem.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 05:48 AM   #4
furby528
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Distribution: Currently Finding Suitable Distro
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I already have 2 partitions (Drive C and D) both in NTFS file system. Win Xp was installed on Drive C and Drive D have nothing in it. Previously, I tried to install MEPIS on Drive D but I couldn't, because it recongise the 2 partitions as 1. Eventually, I gave up installing MEPIS and decided to download SUSE. Now I'm still download SUSE. IS there anyway to retain Win XP and install Linux on Drive D, or must I clear everything, re-partition and install Win XP and Linux again to dual boot?
 
Old 12-07-2005, 06:15 AM   #5
reddazz
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: N. E. England
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Debian
Posts: 16,298

Rep: Reputation: 74
Suse gives you the option to resize your Windows partition and make space for Linux without removing and reinstalling Windows. As for filesystems, don't use ext2 if you can help it. It takes forever to check errors on large hard drives. You are better of using ext3 (which is basically ext2 with journalling) or reiserfs.

Last edited by reddazz; 12-07-2005 at 09:46 AM.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 06:30 AM   #6
Cogar
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: It varies, but usually within 100 feet of a keyboard.
Distribution: Fedora 10, Kubuntu 8.04, Puppy 4.1.2, openSUSE 11.2
Posts: 1,126

Rep: Reputation: 51
Good post, reddazz.

Let me add that the SUSE installer has a very good partitioner. You can add SUSE Linux into an existing computer with multiple drives in pretty much any way you choose while still retaining Windows. A newbie would probably want to select the default suggestions of the SUSE installer (read them to make sure they make sense before committing yourself though).
 
Old 12-07-2005, 07:30 AM   #7
sohny
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: bangalore
Distribution: Redhat,Ubuntu
Posts: 64

Rep: Reputation: 15
In Windows if u have Partition Magic or such application which removes,adds,etc harddisk space ,Then use it to remove D drive & convert it into ext2 or ext3(if u hav tat option).Then restart the system & continue to the Suse Install. When u get to Disk druid u will see the ext2 or ext3 partition u created.Choose it for Root/. Then continue.
This is just one easy way of doing things.i m newbie too so dont believe me completley.

Its Better if u use Ext 3
 
Old 12-07-2005, 02:11 PM   #8
zaphod_es
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Brazil
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 134

Rep: Reputation: 15
Linux cannot safely write to an NTFS partition. If you plan to share date between Linux and Windows you really should also create a FAT32 partition which Linux can handle.

The alternative approach is to have a ext2 partition which windows can read and write to (with additionla software). Just use ext2 on that partition. You are much better off using ext3 or reiserfs for your Linux installation.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 03:22 PM   #9
anti.corp
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Copenhagen
Distribution: Debian E, Vectorlinux 5.1std, Arch, Gentoo 2006.0
Posts: 576

Rep: Reputation: 30
Here is an overwiew. I think it's pretty informative. (from gentoo.org)

ext2 is the tried and true Linux filesystem but doesn't have metadata journaling, which means that routine ext2 filesystem checks at startup time can be quite time-consuming. There is now quite a selection of newer-generation journaled filesystems that can be checked for consistency very quickly and are thus generally preferred over their non-journaled counterparts. Journaled filesystems prevent long delays when you boot your system and your filesystem happens to be in an inconsistent state.

ext3 is the journaled version of the ext2 filesystem, providing metadata journaling for fast recovery in addition to other enhanced journaling modes like full data and ordered data journaling. ext3 is a very good and reliable filesystem. It has an additional hashed b-tree indexing option that enables high performance in almost all situations.

ReiserFS is a B*-tree based filesystem that has very good overall performance and greatly outperforms both ext2 and ext3 when dealing with small files (files less than 4k), often by a factor of 10x-15x. ReiserFS also scales extremely well and has metadata journaling. As of kernel 2.4.18+, ReiserFS is solid and usable as both general-purpose filesystem and for extreme cases such as the creation of large filesystems, the use of many small files, very large files and directories containing tens of thousands of files.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 04:34 PM   #10
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiloaded
Here is an overwiew. I think it's pretty informative. (from gentoo.org)
I disagree a bit that it's informative, because you need to know what the terms mean (like "hashed b-tree indexing") to understand it.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 05:34 PM   #11
KimVette
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Lee, NH
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS, RHEL
Posts: 1,794

Rep: Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by sohny
In Windows if u have Partition Magic or such application which removes,adds,etc harddisk space ,Then use it to remove D drive & convert it into ext2 or ext3(if u hav tat option).Then restart the system & continue to the Suse Install. When u get to Disk druid u will see the ext2 or ext3 partition u created.Choose it for Root/. Then continue.
This is just one easy way of doing things.i m newbie too so dont believe me completley.

Its Better if u use Ext 3
Could you please translate that to English?
 
Old 12-07-2005, 09:34 PM   #12
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 7,162

Rep: Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205
You might not realize that even Windows has "Installable File Systems." It, too, can support multiple disk formats.

Some of the file-system choices in Linux are historic, or exist for compatibility with other systems in a Unix-oriented multi-vendor shop.

Certainly, you will want to choose a filesystem that is oriented toward Linux; not one, like VFAT/NTFS, that is geared for Windows.

Probably you'd be happiest with ext3 or ReiserFS.
 
Old 12-07-2005, 09:38 PM   #13
ninjabob7
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.10 and Slackware 13.1
Posts: 78

Rep: Reputation: 15
Go with ext3. It's backwards-compatible with ext2, but has journaling. It is also possible to get some support under Windows with third-party tools.
 
Old 12-08-2005, 02:03 AM   #14
sohny
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: bangalore
Distribution: Redhat,Ubuntu
Posts: 64

Rep: Reputation: 15
Linux File System? Whats that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KimVette
Could you please translate that to English?
tat means I hav used the suggested method & it has worked perfectly for me.If the suggested method doesn't work or if it backfires for anyone I m not to be held responsible.I think the rest is pretty much clear.
 
Old 12-08-2005, 07:34 AM   #15
anti.corp
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Copenhagen
Distribution: Debian E, Vectorlinux 5.1std, Arch, Gentoo 2006.0
Posts: 576

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nylex
I disagree a bit that it's informative, because you need to know what the terms mean (like "hashed b-tree indexing") to understand it.
Just read the rest of line...

'It has an additional hashed b-tree indexing option THAT enables high performance in almost all situations.'

Thats pretty informative...or? I mean in different levels of prior knowledge to the subject.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Whats this x windows system about linuxmandrake Linux - Software 8 09-17-2004 01:28 PM
Whats the best file sharing package on linux neocookie Linux - Software 17 06-15-2004 11:57 AM
whats the one thing that keeps windows around in/at your computer system('s) mipia General 21 04-10-2004 05:54 PM
whats the best file system? edM Slackware 4 03-22-2004 03:50 PM
Whats your base system? Shak Linux From Scratch 13 04-29-2003 01:04 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:48 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration