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Old 03-27-2005, 10:37 PM   #16
gardenair
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Bundle of thnaks "volvogga " for the detail reply.
 
Old 03-27-2005, 11:00 PM   #17
gardenair
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Now every thing is clear .I have also try Fdisk for linux on my HD to learn about partition with it.

One thing is only confusing that how to allot the Cylinder number. Just like we give the percentage in Fdisk (Under Dos or Win Partion) in MB .Suppose D drive should give 30% or we write in MB the size of partion there . I have full command over Fidk in dos & windows & made many times partitions with different Hard Disks.

The geometry of HD is clear but only this area i.e how to assign the Cylinder value (Staring value & ending value) is confusing me a lot.

just Like 1 to 292 .Here is 1 is 1 K or 292 is also in 292 k.

If you use Fdisk for linux Delete all partions with out saveing & then try to make it again .I hope that you will find my problem about assigning cylinder value or other (if iam unaware about it).

Again thanks for your kind help & guidence.
 
Old 03-27-2005, 11:54 PM   #18
volvogga
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Umm... I think I see what you are doing now.
When you use the fdisk -l command it gives you a unit value. I believe this was yours.
Units = cylinders of 855 * 512 bytes
So multiply 855 by 512 to get 437760. Every Cilinder on our chart is equal to about 437KB. Keep that in mind. So if you start at cilinder 1 and end at 13 (51 to 63 would be the same), the you would multiply 437 by 13 (or maybe 12, but I think 13) to get 5681 blocks, or as you put it earlier, 5681KB.
So if this is right, then you will have to chart out everything ahead of time on paper and then perform your partitioning. I never used the Linux Fdisk to do this, but from my fdisk -l, this is what I deduced.

Hope it helps.
 
Old 03-28-2005, 12:42 AM   #19
gardenair
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Thanks "volvogga" for the help again. I shell try it .
for partition i think that most users use Linux GUI partition tool.
Ok let me know that that for 15 GB space how much space should i
give to

/ partion = ? Mb

/Boot = ? MB

/Home = ? MB

/Swap = ? MB

/User = ? MB

Plz guide me about it for aloocatiing the size of each partion in MB .

My Ram is 128 MB & CPU is 450 MHz .

So much thanks again.
 
Old 03-28-2005, 01:00 PM   #20
volvogga
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hmmm......
Not quite sure to be honest. I only used three partitions, /, /boot, and swap.

The general rule is that you use twice your ram for swap space, but I've heard that this rule is no longer set in stone. Sience your using an older distro (RH8 right?) you shold probably give it the dubbled ram. So 256MB to swap.

/boot doesn't need a lot. I know off the top of my head that Fedora Core 3 wanted 100MB from me, but only used 12MB. You could probably get away with 50MB (I used RH7.2 for a month and seem to remember it asking for only 50MB), but if its no big deal to you, give it about 100MB.

I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think that whatever you dont make a partition for and specify its mount will be grouped on the / partition. So, that is probably where most of you installation files will go. The kernel will be housed here. Give this partition the ammount needed by your installation, and then however much more room you think you may need to grow (installing more programs and such).

By /user I assume you mean /usr. For this directory I found this at http://computer.laborlawtalk.com/USR :

usr: User. The "/usr" directory hierarchy on Unix systems. Once
upon a time, in the early days of Unix, this area actually
held users' home directories and files. Since these tend to
expand much faster than system files, /usr would be mounted on
the biggest disk on the system. The root directory, "/" in
contrast, contains only what is needed to boot the kernel,
after which /usr and other disks could be mounted as part of
the multi-user start-up process.
/usr has been used as the "everything else" area, with many
"system" files such as compiler libraries (/usr/include,
/usr/lib), utilty programs (/usr/bin, /usr/ucb), games
(/usr/games), local additions (/usr/local), manuals
(/usr/man), temporary files and queues for various daemons
(/usr/spool). These optional extras have grown in size as
Unix has evolved and disks have dropped in price. Under later
versions of SunOS, the user files have fled /usr altogether
for a new "/home" partition and temporary files have moved
to "/var". This allows /usr to be mounted read-only with some
gain in security and performance since access times are not
updated for files on read-only file systems.

Personally, I dont know if I would give /usr its own partition, but if you would like to go ahead.

/home is your directory, so this sould be given however much space you think you need. It will store your files and your configuration files for various programs (although thoes are usually small).

I have no idea what /partion is. I have never heard of it and I don't think its standard in linux/unix systems. So the way I see it is that you will have to find the ballance of space between /home (if you want that to be its own partition) and / . Its up to you.

I also found this here http://www.bellevuelinux.org/root_directory.html

For example, directories that are installed by default in the root directory on Red Hat 9 include /bin, /boot, /dev, /etc, /home, /initrd, /lib, /lost+found, /misc, /mnt, /opt, /proc, /root, /sbin, /tmp, /usr and /var. Most of these top level directories, in turn, contain multiple directories and their subdirectories as well as files, although a few may be empty, at least initially (e.g., /lost+found, /misc and /opt).

so dont be to concerned about skipping /home or /usr if you don't want to deal with them.

Good luck.
 
  


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