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Old 09-25-2008, 02:40 PM   #1
wizjr101
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Just not sure where to go


Ok... WHat I am trying to do is put together a webserver that will start out as a test box and then become a production box. I know how to code but don't know the server side of web production. THis is what I want to learn.

Here is what I have for hardware. A HP/Compaq DL380 G3 as my server. 4 18,2gb hdd array, 2 gb ram, 2 2.8DualCore Xeon Procs, and 6 10/100 network ports. THis should be good enough I hope.

Here is where i need help. I have CentOS 5.2, Fedora Core 9, Suse Enterprise Desktop, Ubuntu 8, and Solaris 10 as OS's. I am not sure which to use.

Thank you.
 
Old 09-25-2008, 02:47 PM   #2
irishbitte
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If you have little or no experience using UNIX or Linux, I would recommend Ubuntu. That said, you will still have to get your hands dirty in the code and scripts. Can you say a little bit more about what you're planning on using the server for? Also, have you considered using debian? It's top class, if you are willing to spend a little time on learning it. Ubuntu is based on debian, and uses the same package management system, so it is the way to go, IMHO.
 
Old 09-25-2008, 02:57 PM   #3
wizjr101
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This will go from a test and learning system to a production server in about 12 months. I know thats a big step in a short amount of time but thats what I've been given.
 
Old 09-25-2008, 03:43 PM   #4
irishbitte
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Well, I will definitely recommend debian so. You will have to spend the time learning it, but it is very stable, and compared to SUSE, RHEL, et al, it is not so susceptible to damage, simply because you will not have to change as many things. Get a copy of the Linux Administrators Handbook: http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Administ.../dp/0130084662.

Look up creating a webserver in debian. You can actually specify it to install a webserver when you are installing the OS, but I recommend that you don't do this. It's so easy to install using apt-get:

[CODE]

root@debian:~# apt-get install apache2 php5 mysql

[CODE]

will install apache, php, mysql and configure them more or less correctly for your uses. Happy hunting!
 
Old 09-25-2008, 03:46 PM   #5
irishbitte
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Just on another note, if you're gonna be using this as a test server, why not install debian in a VM like virtual box on your laptop, play with it to your hearts content, break it, make it, etc. When you're happy with how you've set things up, reinstall this setup on your webserver. This way, you can demonstrate what you've done to anyone.

It's how I always test new OS's!
 
Old 09-25-2008, 03:49 PM   #6
mrbass21
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FreeBSD has been wonderful to me. I highly recommend it.

/usr/ports/anythingyouwanttoinstall/
make install clean


 
Old 09-25-2008, 04:24 PM   #7
wizjr101
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After reviewing other boards the most votes seems to go to CentOS. From what I have been reading this is a 'generic' form of Red Hat Server. Is this correct? If it is where do i get my updates from? Cent or RH? Other then their website are there any other resources that someone could list for me?

Again thanks for any help
 
Old 09-25-2008, 04:41 PM   #8
irishbitte
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I used CentOS originally as an LTSP Server. It is literally the source code of RHEL compiled, and all Red Hat branding removed. Anything that is valid for RHEL is valid for CentOS, apart from anything connected with Red Hat support. CentOS is good for testing, but I would not recommend running it on a production server unless you are really able to live without support from the supplier. YMMV.

In terms of updates, CentOS have their own repositories for yum, and they try to mirror red hat repos as much as possible.
 
Old 09-25-2008, 04:59 PM   #9
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wizjr101 View Post
Here is where i need help. I have CentOS 5.2, Fedora Core 9, Suse Enterprise Desktop, Ubuntu 8, and Solaris 10 as OS's. I am not sure which to use.
If that were the complete list of ditros/versions from which you could choose, I wouldn't go for FC9, SLED or Ubuntu 8 (not that there is any such thing). These are all primarily desktop distros; while you could configure a server version out of any of them, why not start with something intended to be a server and not rely on your, presumably-not-yet-tested, config skills.

So, if I wanted a SuSE server, I would prefer SLES over SLED, for example. You could use Ubuntu and get the server kernel, but I don't really feel that Ubuntu has any advantage of the Debian from which it is derived, and, in a server context and it has some disadvantages.

Centos would be quite a good choice and Solaris has some technical advantages too, but remember if you do choose this, you'll be somewhat 'out on a limb' for community tech support. But given that you could choose anything, not just the list that you have given, Debian is really quite a good suggestion. So I'd choose from Debian, SLES, Centos (or equivalent), but there are other choices, and you'd get different advice if you were an expert (although, then you probably wouldn't want my advice).
 
Old 09-25-2008, 05:17 PM   #10
AuroraCA
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Unless you wish to futz with endless configuration and want to spend time tweaking your system get Ubuntu-Server and install the LAMP configuration. It will take you all of 15 minutes on a clean system from start to finish and you can then proceed to hosting your sites. Ubuntu is a very secure server and there is no Xorg or desktop installed unless you wish to add it later.

I have set up Ubuntu-Server and had websites up and running within 60 minutes of starting. Web sites were Joomla 1.5, Wordpress MU, and MindTouch Deki.

So many people get caught up into thinking that Linux needs to be complex and complicated to be good. It does not. People who say it is inferior or has problems should state those problems or the reasons rather than just repeat hearsay and vague innuendo.

There are sites online like http://www.howtoforge.com which walk you through installation and configuration of most of the most common applications and packages. Additionally there are thousands of dedicated Ubuntu blogs, wikis and forums which provide complete information and assistance should you have any questions or problems.

If you want to tinker and/or waste your time maintaining your server OS then pick any Linux but it you want to run a website or other application as your end result I'd recommend Ubuntu-Server.
 
Old 09-25-2008, 05:37 PM   #11
wizjr101
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Well to explain a little better I am basically a web guy that has been working on PC's for over 20 years that got a *nix Server Project dumped into my lap. I know very little about linux or any of the Unix other them some VERY basic how to move around and move files commands. The server will be a test unit for the first 12 months then we will go live with our web site. I want to setup the server once and not have to worry about it till we need to go Live with the site. Nothing has been decided on WHAT OS to use other then its got to be as cheep as possible, free would bee the best option for these guys. SO I need to learn everything there is to know about *nix webserver administration, *nix administration, email, DNS, and anything else in one year. Plus design the site. Big challenge i know. So any information would be a BIG help.

Thank you so far for what you have given to me its letting me know what I need to learn and narrowing down things.
 
Old 09-25-2008, 07:37 PM   #12
rob.rice
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this should get you started
http://www.linux-tutorial.info/
 
Old 09-25-2008, 08:57 PM   #13
chrism01
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As mentioned, CENTOS is basically free version of RHEL and each version is supported/updated for 5 yrs iirc.
I'd start with that, and, if at the end of your 12 mths, you're still not happy about being able to run in prod without phone support, buy the equiv RHEL for a while (eg 1 yr). You can easily go back to CENTOS after you are happy.

Meanwhile these may be useful:

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

The whole of www.tldp.org, esp
http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html
http://www.tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/

Also
http://www.adminschoice.com/docs/cro...Crontab%20file
http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/linux/

That should be plenty to start with

Welcome to LQ and good luck
 
Old 09-25-2008, 09:39 PM   #14
rob.rice
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OH do find a copy of the NAG read and reread it
Right Now ! you are looking at one of the largest linux knowledge bases on the net
read around here there is an lot to learn right here on linuxquestions.org

Last edited by rob.rice; 09-25-2008 at 09:46 PM.
 
Old 09-26-2008, 08:53 AM   #15
wizjr101
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Thanks for all the advice so far ITs been REALLY helpful. I am going to try Debian and CentOS this weekend and see how the are with my system. I keep you all posted as to how its going. My only other question would be for Rob.Rice. Im not familiar with 'NAG', what is this. It's probably something simple and I'll feel like a computer noob all over again.

Again thanks for everything.
 
  


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