LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - Newbie (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/)
-   -   I've got questions, you got answers? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/ive-got-questions-you-got-answers-712655/)

cynicalpsycho 03-18-2009 08:37 PM

I've got questions, you got answers?
 
I'm really interested in getting a core understanding of linux.
The first step I took on my journey of discover was installing Ubuntu through wubi (wasn't very technical) and that's cool and all, but it's just so damn user friendly that it doesn't seem like there's much worth learnin. (and I get it, they're goin for the whole "human" thing.) but It's like windows all over again.

Anyway, I've read some things on this site that lead me to believe that Slack is the way I should go if I really wanna get linux... At the same time I just a dirty dumn newb that needs a bit of a base, I've started reading the linux bible... but I still want that shortcut, that boost in the right direction if you will... i guess that's why i'm here to get the quick answers from the wise forum.

So here they are:
0. Am I off in my assumptions of ubuntu being a poor linux learning environment?
1. So far I've read that slack is a 32 bit OS, but my system is set up for 64 bit processessing... Will it still work?
2. If no to questions 1. are there any other 64bit alternatives would you recommend?
3. I've just began reading the linux bible. From your personal experience, what reading have you found most beneficial in your mastering of the OS?
4. Any little known treasure troves of knowledge or pearls of wisdom you would like to pass on to an eager Linux apprentice?

pixellany 03-18-2009 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cynicalpsycho (Post 3480056)
I'm really interested in getting a core understanding of linux.
The first step I took on my journey of discover was installing Ubuntu through wubi (wasn't very technical) and that's cool and all, but it's just so damn user friendly that it doesn't seem like there's much worth learnin. (and I get it, they're goin for the whole "human" thing.) but It's like windows all over again.

Anyway, I've read some things on this site that lead me to believe that Slack is the way I should go if I really wanna get linux... At the same time I just a dirty dumn newb that needs a bit of a base, I've started reading the linux bible... but I still want that shortcut, that boost in the right direction if you will... i guess that's why i'm here to get the quick answers from the wise forum.

Welcome to LQ!!

Quote:

0. Am I off in my assumptions of ubuntu being a poor linux learning environment?
You can learn Linux with Ubuntu as well as you can with any distro.
Quote:

1. So far I've read that slack is a 32 bit OS, but my system is set up for 64 bit processessing... Will it still work?
32-bit operating systems (and applications) will work fine on 64-bit hardware, but not the other way around.
Quote:

2. If no to questions 1. are there any other 64bit alternatives would you recommend?
At least starting out, stick with 32-bit. 64 still has occassional issues.
Quote:

3. I've just began reading the linux bible. From your personal experience, what reading have you found most beneficial in your mastering of the OS?
Linux in a Nutshell from O'Reilly, Bash Guide for Beginners (at tldp.org)--but mostly just using it and asking questions on fora such as LQ.
Quote:

4. Any little known treasure troves of knowledge or pearls of wisdom you would like to pass on to an eager Linux apprentice?
Just use it....and avoid the temptation to boot back into Windows (eventually, you may find you don't need it at all.)

linus72 03-18-2009 09:55 PM

Slackware 12.2-most stable linux I've had...and you'll learn alot here!

chrism01 03-19-2009 02:10 AM

As per Pixellany.. for 3 & 4 try rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

lazlow 03-19-2009 02:48 AM

I guess I would say that the 32bit/64bit thing is pretty much a non issue at this point. Usually I would say if you have 2GB or more of ram then use 64bit, if you have less then use 32 bit.

Probably the best reading you can do is in forums. Read through the threads and learn about the issues. Before long you will run into threads that you know the answer to and you can begin to contribute. You will probably see people trying things that you had never considered (sometimes a good thing / sometimes not).

You will be amazed how quickly you will be able to do without windows. April 16th will make a full year since I have booted any of my machines to windows.

dickgregory 03-19-2009 09:04 AM

Slackware is a fine distro, but most people find it quite advanced for someone starting out. You might want a gentler learning curve, and Ubuntu is fine for that. As a beginner you probably don't know about some of the various sysadmin styles that are in use. Ubuntu is a "sudo" distro, where command line admin is done using the sudo command to gain root privileges using your own password. Many distros require you to acquire root privileges using root's password. You will need to develop your own preferences as both approaches have strengths and weaknesses. My personal preference is to not use sudo, since I don't like the idea of someone gaining access to my system by cracking my password. For that reason I stick with non-sudo distros.

I am currently using Mandriva 2009.0 and Suse 11.1.

For the most effective learning config, why don't you install a good newbie friendly distro, like any of the top 10 on distrowatch. Install Virtualbox. Then create some virtual systems and install your learning distros there. That way you have a complete easy-to-use system available at the same time you are tinkering with the more "expert" ones.

You might learn the most by creating systems in this order:
Gentoo: Uses lots of manual configuration but takes care of package dependencies.
Slackware: You have full control, but have to resolve all dependencies yourself.
LFS: You do everything yourself.

By the time you have brought all 3 of those systems to full gui & eye-candy status, you will be answering a lot more questions than you are asking on the forum.

cynicalpsycho 03-19-2009 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pixellany (Post 3480093)
Welcome to LQ!!

Thank you for your reply! Twas very informative.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pixellany (Post 3480093)
32-bit operating systems (and applications) will work fine on 64-bit hardware, but not the other way around.
At least starting out, stick with 32-bit. 64 still has occasional issues.

what issues exactly?

Quote:

Originally Posted by pixellany (Post 3480093)
Linux in a Nutshell from O'Reilly, Bash Guide for Beginners (at tldp.org)--but mostly just using it and asking questions on fora such as LQ.

I've got access to both of those online, thank you for the recommendation!

Quote:

Originally Posted by pixellany (Post 3480093)
Just use it....and avoid the temptation to boot back into Windows (eventually, you may find you don't need it at all.)

I like this advice and shall be sticking to it!

Quads 03-19-2009 07:01 PM

I was pretty much in your same position about nine months ago. Life long DOS/Windows user, and finally just got tired of all the Windows issues.

I started out with Mandriva 2008, but with all the buzz about Ubuntu out there I decided to give Kubuntu a shot. I have since come back to Mandriva but I have to say that there are a lot of Ubuntu users out there and a lot of information particular to that distro is available. Probably the easiest to learn on because there is so much support out there.

Just beware that it is a steep learning curve. I think that Linux for the most part is easy to use. Anyone can sit down in front of my PC and use it. But learning how it works is tough, not because its that difficult but because it is totally foreign to us at first. But stick with it and you'll be surprised how quickly you'll pick it up. Just don't give up and go back to Windows!!!

cynicalpsycho 03-19-2009 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dickgregory (Post 3480659)
For the most effective learning config, why don't you install a good newbie friendly distro, like any of the top 10 on distrowatch. Install Virtualbox. Then create some virtual systems and install your learning distros there. That way you have a complete easy-to-use system available at the same time you are tinkering with the more "expert" ones.

You might learn the most by creating systems in this order:
Gentoo: Uses lots of manual configuration but takes care of package dependencies.
Slackware: You have full control, but have to resolve all dependencies yourself.
LFS: You do everything yourself.

By the time you have brought all 3 of those systems to full gui & eye-candy status, you will be answering a lot more questions than you are asking on the forum.

This is great advice and an excellent idea!
you couldn't direct me to some more information about virtual box could you?

JaksoDebr 03-19-2009 07:10 PM

>> 0. Am I off in my assumptions of ubuntu being a poor linux learning environment?
Ubuntu is certainly not poor by no means. If you want to deal with the core UNIX beat, then open up a Terminal, set the Terminal background to black (if not that way already) so that it's even more spooky.

>> 1. So far I've read that slack is a 32 bit OS, but my system is set up for 64 bit processessing... Will it still work?
A 64-bit system will be able to run a 32-bit system, it"s only the other way around that doesn't work.

>> 2. If no to questions 1. are there any other 64bit alternatives would you recommend?
There are several Linux distribution with 64-bit alternatives. Have a look at distrowatch.org for a list of these. I actually would be surprised if Slackware wouldn't have a 64-bit version as well.

>> 3. I've just began reading the linux bible. From your personal experience, what reading have you found most beneficial in your mastering of the OS?
The Linux Documentation Project (tldp.org), Howtoforge.org, LinuxToday.com and a lot more. For printed books see Wrox or O'Reilly.

>> 4. Any little known treasure troves of knowledge or pearls of wisdom you would like to pass on to an eager Linux apprentice?
Learning by doing is the way to go. No need to rush, everything will fall in place.

JD

Linux Archive

Quads 03-19-2009 07:13 PM

Virtualbox is awesome. Just google it and their homepage comes up first. I've used it quite a bit. It couldn't be easier to set up.

cynicalpsycho 03-19-2009 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Quads (Post 3481344)
Virtualbox is awesome. Just google it and their homepage comes up first. I've used it quite a bit. It couldn't be easier to set up.

Would you recommend running it on windows or ubuntu? I've just downloaded the package on ubuntu. is it just as easy through ubuntu?

cynicalpsycho 03-19-2009 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JaksoDebr (Post 3481340)
The Linux Documentation Project (tldp.org), Howtoforge.org, LinuxToday.com and a lot more. For printed books see Wrox or O'Reilly.

AWESOME!... that's the stuff i'm lookin for.

cynicalpsycho 03-19-2009 07:39 PM

also about virtual box... doesn't it lag alot? how's the performance compared to the actual?

Maligree 03-19-2009 07:47 PM

It is lower, of course - you're running two OSes at the same time on one machine - you'd expect that to happen. But the truth is, with guest additions installed and in full-screen mode you may forget there's a hypervisor running in the back..

There are many howtos/tutorial on how to install guest additions for each distro, I'm sure google will provide you what you need - when you get there. ;)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:32 AM.