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Old 02-17-2012, 07:54 PM   #1
ulkoma
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Is there a way to view ALL devices connected to the system?


I mean ALL devices
It possible in MS Windows via Device Manager how come it's not possible under linux?

Also if there is such way does it tell which devices lack drivers and which ones have been installed correctly? again this is available with MS Windows

Thanks in advance
 
Old 02-17-2012, 08:26 PM   #2
Cedrik
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In Linux you can use dmesg command with the help of grep to filter output
 
Old 02-18-2012, 03:46 AM   #3
singhjc
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Hi and if you want attached hardware list also then use

#lspci
 
Old 02-18-2012, 04:07 AM   #4
tommcd
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To view all usb connected devices simply run lsusb in the terminal.
What distro and desktop environment are you using? In most all modern Linux distros you can view any connected devices like mp3 players, external hard drives, flash drives, and the like straight from the file manager.

Last edited by tommcd; 02-18-2012 at 04:16 AM.
 
Old 02-18-2012, 04:15 PM   #5
ulkoma
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OK so #lspci is to show the PCI attached devices regardless if the driver is installed or not
lsusb is for the USB ones

Is that ALL? no other buses? no other types of hardware? and how would I know which device lacks the driver and which one is installed properly?
Thanks
 
Old 02-18-2012, 05:42 PM   #6
Cedrik
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Maybe I am missing something but... when the device works, you can safely guess the driver is loaded and works proprelly

When you hot plug a device, in doubt see output of dmesg command
 
Old 02-18-2012, 08:20 PM   #7
frankbell
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There is an excellent GUI tool for viewing hardware called hardinfo. I think it's available in most repos.

In KDE, the KInfoCenter is also quite thorough.

Gnome, in contrast, takes a minimalist view of GUI tools in an attempt to avoid clutter.
 
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Old 02-19-2012, 10:34 AM   #8
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
There is an excellent GUI tool for viewing hardware called hardinfo. I think it's available in most repos.
Yes, hardinfo is quite useful for displaying hardware and even contains some benchmarking tools as well. On my Lubuntu 11.10 system hardinfo came preinstalled.

To: ulkoma,
If you tell us what distro and desktop environment you are using then we can likely give you more specific help.
Is there some specific device you are having trouble using on Linux? If so, then tell us what the problematic device is and we can hopefully help you to get it working.

I use Slackware with XFCE and Lubuntu with LXDE. Any attatched devices that contain files I can view, copy, paste, and delete files straight from the file manager or the terminal.
Using lspci, lsusb, hardinfo, or lshw (list hardware) can provide more detailed information if I need it.

Last edited by tommcd; 02-19-2012 at 10:40 AM.
 
Old 02-19-2012, 03:25 PM   #9
ulkoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommcd View Post
To: ulkoma,
If you tell us what distro and desktop environment you are using then we can likely give you more specific help.
Is there some specific device you are having trouble using on Linux? If so, then tell us what the problematic device is and we can hopefully help you to get it working.
Thanks for all the informative answers guys
I am not using any distro at the moment, I keep trying different distro everyday
I am just trying to compare Windows to Linux before I migrate forever

GUI tools are not the best IMO when it comes to Linux (unlike Windows), maybe I am mistaken but I prefer to do everything via plain boring text when it comes to Linux

I'll re-phrase my question:
Do lspci & lsusb show EVERY piece of hardware connected to my machine? in other words is it correct to say that there is only TWO types of buses under Linux? PCI & USB

if this is correct then I'll move on to the next part of my question/comparison
 
Old 02-19-2012, 08:43 PM   #10
frankbell
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lspci shows PCI devices.

lsusb shows USB devices.

lscpu displays CPU information.

dmesg will show all devices, including the ones shown by the above commands, detected by the kernel. The output of dmesg can be well over 1500 lines long on some systems.

Each of these commands has its own man page.
 
Old 02-19-2012, 08:54 PM   #11
chrism01
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Code:
ls /proc
is pretty informative too
 
  


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