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Old 08-18-2005, 07:35 PM   #1
Kevin Tough
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Question Is There a Linux Task Manager Equivalent to you know who's?


Runaway program in Linux. Yes, I have incountered this with my new Linux fingers. Is there a way to see a list of my running programs, TSR's and such?


Kevin Tough
 
Old 08-18-2005, 07:40 PM   #2
bosewicht
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I think kde now has a ctrl+alt+del kind of thing you are talking about. Below are some cmds to do it from the terminal though.

From
http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/linux/...processes.html

Checking running processes

While logged in as root, type "ps -ax |more" or "ps -aux |more". You will get a list of all processes running on your computer. You will see the process id (PID), process status (STAT) various statistics, and the command name. You can kill a process by typing "kill" and the PID number right afterwards similar to the line below.

kill 1721

You can also stop and restart processes by sending them various signals as in the below examples:

kill -STOP 1721 Stops (suspends) process 1721 by sending the STOP signal to the process. This process will still be on the task list. The process can't catch or ignore the STOP signal.
kill -CONT 1721 Continue process 1721 causing it to resume. The CONT signal is sent to the process.
kill -TERM 1721 Terminates process 1721 by sending the TERM signal to the process. This process will no longer show up on the task list if it is actually terminated. Process terminated cannot be continued. The TERM signal can be caught so TERM is not guaranteed to kill the process.
kill -HUP 1721 Stops, then restarts process 1721. This is usually done when a process is not working properly or the configuration files for that process have been changed. This command sends the HUP signal to the process which means hangup. This signal can be caught by the process.
killall -HUP myprint Restarts any process with the name "myprint".
kill -TERM myprint Terminates any process with the name "myprint".
 
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Old 08-18-2005, 07:43 PM   #3
samael26
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Type 'top' in a console as normal user to see all your running programs, amount of memory used, etc..
 
Old 08-18-2005, 08:17 PM   #4
aysiu
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I'm using Ubuntu, and there's something called System Monitor that's a graphical system monitor that's a lot like XP/2000's task manager.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 08:39 PM   #5
craigevil
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Gnome System Monitor
KDE System Guard
Htop
htop is an interactive process viewer for Linux. It aims to be a 'better top': you can scroll the process list vertically and horizontally, and select a process to be killed with the arrow keys instead of by typing its process id.

xkill will "kill" a program.
KDE has a runaway process applet for the taskbar.

From time to time you may wish to view processes that are running on Linux. To obtain a list of these processes, type ``ps -aux''.

The list shows you the owner of the process ("nobody" for special services such as web servers), the process identification number, the % of CPU time the process is currently using, the % of memory the process is consuming, and other related information, as well as a description of the task itself.

To get more information on a given process, type ``ps pid'' (where "pid" is the process identification number).

If you happen to notice a service is not operating, you can use the "kill -HUP pid" (where "pid" is the process identification number as shown in the process list produced with "ps").

Last edited by craigevil; 08-18-2005 at 08:42 PM.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 09:08 PM   #6
tkedwards
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Press ctrl+escape to bring up the KDE System Monitor if you're running KDE
 
Old 08-19-2005, 03:55 AM   #7
samael26
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Hi,

Htop
htop is an interactive process viewer for Linux. It aims to be a 'better top': you can scroll the process list vertically and horizontally, and select a process to be killed with the arrow keys instead of by typing its process id.

Thanks for the info, craigevil. htop is in fact better than top.

regards
 
Old 03-20-2007, 12:29 AM   #8
ussr_1991
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Question So KDE is better?

So KDE got a similar Task Manager, as in Mandrake 10.1, is there a need to type all these commands to do the above things? Or can I just Ctrl+ Alt + Del then right click a process in the processes tab in order to change priority or even end process tree?
 
Old 03-20-2007, 03:23 AM   #9
johngreenwood
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Yes, in KDE you hit CTRL+ESC to bring up the 'task manager', (you can change it to CTRL+ALT+DEL if you want).
 
Old 03-20-2007, 03:00 PM   #10
tkedwards
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Quote:
is there a need to type all these commands to do the above things?
No you can choose to use either the GUI or command line, whichever suits you
 
Old 03-21-2007, 07:36 AM   #11
ussr_1991
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Thanks. XD
 
Old 03-21-2007, 02:27 PM   #12
Kevin Tough
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Add to Gnome Taskbar ...

The most frequent use of the Task Manager is to shut down an application. In Gnome on Fedora 6 right click on the taskbar and you can add the button "Force a misbehaving application to quit".

From the command line the command ps -e will show you all the current processes. man ps will describe in detail anything you wish to achieve regarding process control.

Namaste,

Kevin Tough
 
Old 03-21-2007, 02:50 PM   #13
nx5000
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There's htop, but it's a command line (tui to be precise)
And atop with kernel patches is very good, it will tell you which process uses the disk and which other is using the network.
 
Old 11-21-2012, 01:43 PM   #14
roselama
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If you want a task manager for Linux running on embedded device, with no X-Windows support, you can use Remote Task Monitor. It runs as client on Windows PC, and service on Linux. It will give you same CPU usage as top does, but in a GUI client like the Windows task manager.
 
Old 11-21-2012, 04:47 PM   #15
Fred Caro
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All,
not forgeting a ram usage reporting tool from the cli (terminal) 'free', e.g., "free -m" gives you a 'snapshot' of ram in use now calibrated in MB, otherwise it is in KB.

Fred.
 
  


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