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Old 08-05-2014, 11:07 AM   #1
sergeyna
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Question is there a diffrent between operation system commands?


i mean if there any different in Centos Command Line compared to Ubuntu Or Red Hat?
 
Old 08-05-2014, 11:21 AM   #2
bigrigdriver
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You might encounter such a situation if there are different versions of utilities from one Gnu/Linux distro to another distro. In such a case, the newer version may have added options not found in the older version. Otherwise, there would be no difference.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 11:29 AM   #3
DavidMcCann
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Also, the command-line utilities that aren't part of the Gnu toolkit will obviously differ: you won't get far entering "yum" on Ubuntu or "apt-get" on CentOS!

Very roughly speaking, if it's for handling software or configuration, then it belongs to the distro; if it's for finding out things (e.g. find) or giving orders to the operating system (e.g. useradd) it belongs to Gnu.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 11:32 AM   #4
TroN-0074
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There are differences but they are like distro specific. Check out the type of distros families then you will be able to identify these differences. look for RPM base distros and DEB base distros then you can easily tell what these differences are.

Keep in mind Debian base distros use apt-get to install software, or synaptic, Ubuntu uses their software center. Red Hat uses yum, OpenSUSE uses zypper, Arch uses packman, and so and so.

Some distros also use systemd and other use upstart, that makes a different too.

Beside that everything else should be the same,
 
Old 08-05-2014, 11:51 AM   #5
sergeyna
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its seems like alot of studying

i am currently Windows Administrator and i begin self studying linux ubuntu,
i wonder if its a good choice? or should i choice diffrent operation system for studying?
cause from what i understand there is diffrent between the operation systems, i wonder how big the diffrent and if i know well ubuntu does it mean i can manage centos? or red hat? or each operation system should be studied ?
 
Old 08-05-2014, 11:55 AM   #6
szboardstretcher
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The two OS's that I see most in current datacenters is Debian and Centos. Each person that replies is going to tell you a different experience.

My advice is to stay away from Ubuntu though. You are more likely to see Debian in production, and in the end you will be able to use Ubuntu if required.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 11:57 AM   #7
suicidaleggroll
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There may also be some shell differences. CentOS defaults to the bash shell, IIRC Ubuntu defaults to the dash shell, so there may be some small syntax differences there when you get into scripting.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 08-05-2014 at 11:58 AM.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 12:00 PM   #8
szboardstretcher
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And Ubuntu uses 'upstart' IIRC,.. and also apt-get instead of yum.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 12:38 PM   #9
TroN-0074
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I would say Ubuntu is fine for an introductory Linux base OS. Stay with it until you feel comfortable with it, then switch to whatever other distro you want to try. By then you will know what other distro sound interesting to you.
 
Old 08-05-2014, 12:54 PM   #10
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To me, as a casual user who "plays", I tended to find that "getting into" Linux was difficult at first but that was a while ago when sometimes only one distribution would work with your hardware.
I would say if you install and use any distro then that's a good start.
Then mess with it and explore.
Then install another family and note the differences and similarities.
Try a few then stick with one and become more learnered in it.
Then try more and keep learning.
I say the above as somebody who knows how to install, configure and use a few distributions and has answered some of the most simple questions here. I add this as I realise I am only partially qualified to answer.
 
  


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