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Old 07-02-2015, 06:27 PM   #1
lauralinux
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Is that possible that operating system user i able to write in different directories?


Hi all,
This is my first post.
I would like to know if is that possible that some operating system user, we can say "userA", if he has already access to write in example, to directory "/u01/fs/dir1" (and this is his home), would be possible set permissions in order to "userA" can write in "/u01/dir2"? , without changing his actual home, just grant to him the access to write in this second directory.... is that possible?

Any comment very appreciated!
Best Regards!
 
Old 07-02-2015, 06:55 PM   #2
suicidaleggroll
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Sure, just change the permissions on /u01/dir2 to something that userA can access. Either make userA the owner, or add userA to whatever group /u01/dir2 belongs to and add group write permission, or open up /u01/dir2 write access to everybody. It depends on whether you only want userA to be able to write to it, or you want a group of people to be able to write to it, or you want every user on the system to be able to write to it.
 
Old 07-02-2015, 08:19 PM   #3
JaseP
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Be careful as a new user that you do not write to system directories. You can seriously mess up your system that way. For instance, you could overwrite a library that is essential to the operation of your GUI,... And then you are "hosed."

You should learn a little about what the various directories (/usr, /dev, /opt, /boot, /etc, /lib, /proc, /sys, /var & /dev) are in the root directory and gain an understanding of their purpose before even making an attempt to tinker with the file system.
 
Old 07-03-2015, 01:21 AM   #4
veerain
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Welcome to Linux Questions!

Read about unix permissions in Wikipedia.
 
Old 07-03-2015, 04:34 AM   #5
fatmac
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Welcome aboard.
 
Old 07-03-2015, 10:26 AM   #6
lauralinux
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Thank you to all for your responses... I just wanted to be sure that this kind of operation was possible and in the meanwhile research on it(I did find something about acl as well)... is just that I was told by unix team that this is not possible because the directory is a kind of ChrootDirectory ... so, not sure if with a directory of that type is true that this kind of permission is not possible then...

Best Regards!,
 
Old 07-04-2015, 12:49 AM   #7
JaseP
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So,... You are talking about a server that is being maintained by someone else, and for at least some functionality they are using chroot to kind of "tack on" another version of the OS (or use a chroot jail to limit you)?!?! As far as permissions and file system are concerned, they can give you as much read/write authority as they want to... They question is whether they want to or not... My suspicions are that they gave you the answer they did because they don't want you to have the access that you want to have (i.e.: it's against their policies). Either they are concerned that you will do damage to the filesystem, or it is too much work for them to configure it to do what you want to be able to do... or both.

Last edited by JaseP; 07-04-2015 at 01:06 AM.
 
  


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