LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-07-2011, 04:20 AM   #1
Knightron
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Australia
Distribution: OpenSUSE
Posts: 1,396
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 166Reputation: 166
Is Slackware hard


Hi, i've recently entered into the world of linux. I'm currently running Ubuntu, but have been reading up on other Distros. People say that Ubuntu is the easiest for beginners but i did try out Mandriva on a virtual machine and it was just as easy to use, and it's supposed to be about the same as opensuse. I've read a little about slackware and that it is supposed to be hard to use for noobs, and although that's perhaps not good, my curiosity keeps drawing me back to it, and i'd like to know what's so different about slackware, and what other people have experienced with it.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 04:35 AM   #2
chrisretusn
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Philippines
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 600

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
So just give it a try on a virtual machine and decide for your self.

Here is my answer to your question, "Is Slackware hard?" No it is not.

I think Ubuntu is hard.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 04:47 AM   #3
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,819
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218Reputation: 1218
Try it in a virtual machine and you'll see for yourself.
I wouldn't say that slackware is hard to install/run.
It's just sometimes you do things manually editing config files instead of clicking on buttons as it is in Ubuntu.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 06:17 AM   #4
H_TeXMeX_H
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287
It kinda depends on your attitude, which so far is good. I mean, the fact that you are curious about it, and are willing to use it, that's a good attitude. Some people who try Slackware have the attitude that it should be like Window$ and Ubuntu, and it should have all these GUI configs and it should hold your hand all the way through ... well, they will be disappointed. However, it is a great distro and is definitely worth trying, just make sure to read some install guides before trying it, so you don't freak out when it drops you to a CLI. This also does not mean that you cannot configure slackware to login using a GUI, which you can do.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 11:35 AM   #5
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 4,470

Rep: Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399
You can always try Salix: Slackware with added tools, dependency resolution, and 500 extra programs. Of course, with any distro you don't have to use the GUI. When I installed the Fedora 14 I'm using, I did a lot of the configuration with the CLI.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 12:11 PM   #6
H_TeXMeX_H
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287Reputation: 1287
It's true Salix is somewhat more friendly for a newbie, I've used it myself. However, I still prefer slackware, it's closer to what I want.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 01:09 PM   #7
Knightron
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Australia
Distribution: OpenSUSE
Posts: 1,396
Blog Entries: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 166Reputation: 166
I really do want to give it a go. I did go on the websight to attempt to download the iso, but the mirrors were down that day(yes all of them). Once i get time again, and the speed lol, i'll give it another shot and try to set her up in a virtual machine.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 02:57 PM   #8
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,735
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062Reputation: 2062
Hi,

Here's additional links;

Official List of Mirrors
AlphaGeek's Unofficial Mirror List <<<<<<< Great
LinuxQuestions.org > ISOs > SlackwareŽ
elektroni <-FTP
Oregon State <- FTP/HTTP + Open Source Lab + Hosting Policy + bandwidth of over 1 gigabit per second
AlienBase <- Alien_Bob's mirror + 'via http' + rsync://taper.alienbase.nl/mirrors/ + 'The physical server is on a gigabit Internet connection, so I guess I can offer a speedy mirror service! In fact, the mirrors are already complete. With a re-sync of several times a day, I hope to offer an up to date service.' Read the intro + Alien has always been unselfish when it comes to Slackware
The Linux Mirror Project <- Categories: Distributions, kernel & Applications

The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 03-07-2011, 06:27 PM   #9
Ignotum Per Ignotius
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Wales, UK
Distribution: Slackware, CrunchBang
Posts: 69
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 42
Quote:
Hi, i've recently entered into the world of linux.
Know now that you'll never escape...

Quote:
I'm currently running Ubuntu, but have been reading up on other Distros. People say that Ubuntu is the easiest for beginners but i did try out Mandriva on a virtual machine and it was just as easy to use, and it's supposed to be about the same as opensuse.
Yes, I don't find that there's much to choose in terms of user-friendliness between Ubuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, etc... They're all pretty much equally difficult/easy to install and to use in my experience.

Quote:
I've read a little about slackware and that it is supposed to be hard to use for noobs, and although that's perhaps not good, my curiosity keeps drawing me back to it, and i'd like to know what's so different about slackware, and what other people have experienced with it.
Despite its reputation amongst new Linux users, Slackware's not really that difficult --- if you've tried Ubuntu and Mandriva, you've already got some understanding of Linux under your belt, and there's loads of good, well-written documentation on Slackware (some of which other posters have already recommended) --- many have found that the experience of getting Slackware up and running has provided them with more of a window on how a Linux system works than, for example, installing Fedora from a DVD.

...Anyway, you asked what's so different about Slackware (presumably as compared with something like Ubuntu) --- here's what I reckon the most noticeable things are for a newbie...
  1. No X-based installation. The installation is text-based, and requires some (fairly rudimentary) knowledge of your system. (For example, users need to know the basics of how their network is set up --- not exactly rocket-science, though!)
  2. No simple non-destructive repartitioning on installation. If your entire hard disk is one big Windows partition, then you'll either have to use something like gparted (available on a Ubuntu live CD) or repartition it destructively (after backing up your data) using the Linux fdisk provided on the Slackware installation disk.
  3. No dependency-checking. If you install a piece of software which depends upon another package in order to work, Slackware will not by default check whether the latter package is installed or not. Hence when you come to run the software, you may get dependency errors. (It's usually a trivial matter to track down & install the missing packages, though.)
  4. No graphical login. You log in at a text-screen, and then configure & start X manually. This might sound rather daunting but these days it really isn't that hard --- indeed it may merely entail entering just one or two commands.

Anyway, I hope that this has answered your question: I run a slightly old version of Slackware (simply because I'm too lazy to upgrade on every release), so things may have changed a little since I last installed it, but I imagine that the differences which will strike you first will nevertheless be those listed above.

...And in reading the above, please bear in mind that Slackware is my favourite distribution and that love is blind...

Take it for a spin and let us know what you think...

Good luck!
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:12 PM   #10
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 12,268
Blog Entries: 16

Rep: Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125Reputation: 3125
I have nothing to add. Ignotum Per Ignotius gave an excellent description of the differences between Slackware and most distros.

I just wanted to add my encouragement for learning Slackware. Slackware is not hard, but it doesn't hold your hand; it expects you to do your homework. The Slackware community is large and supportive. (In fact, the LQ Slackware forum is the "unofficial official" Slackware support forum.)

Once you learn your way around Slackware, no Linux distro can ever intimidate you again because you will know the basics of how Linux works and will know that you will be able to figure out how to do whatever you want to do.

I did a series of blog posts at a blog where I sometimes post (guess that's a little redundant, what I mean is I'm a guest poster) on installing Slackware. This is the last one; it points to the preceding ones.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:22 PM   #11
FredGSanford
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: USA
Distribution: Mageia Cauldron - Debian Testing - Salix OS
Posts: 1,049
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 147Reputation: 147
I'll say when I first started with linux, other than installing Caldera Linux, my first distro, and had to manually install X and KDE. After that when I tried other distros, Slackware & Debian was the only two I had luck with. All the so-called easy distros wouldn't install on my hardware at the time. Go for it!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
slackware is supposed to be hard? Kahless LinuxQuestions.org Member Success Stories 16 06-10-2005 03:49 PM
Slackware? Hard? Ha ha ha! Hosiah LinuxQuestions.org Member Success Stories 6 06-06-2005 03:15 PM
graphing a new hard to slackware djgerbavore Slackware 1 08-05-2004 03:23 PM
Slackware. Is it hard to install? RoaCh Of DisCor Slackware 8 04-09-2004 10:08 AM
Is slackware really hard work with? keeknspin Linux - Newbie 14 01-03-2004 06:22 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:55 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration