LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-18-2014, 05:04 PM   #1
sigint-ninja
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: Republic Of Ireland
Distribution: Debian,Centos,Slackware
Posts: 472

Rep: Reputation: 29
Is it worth getting into Linux From Scratch?


Hello guys,

I came across LFS which im sure you guys are all well aware of...
been playing with linux a few months, def have a handle on the basics
but want to grow...is LFS a good idea? I was blown away at the concept
of building your own linux based OS...that sounds awesome.
obviously you will need to be able to code in C??? right? or some other language...

I was just wondering about LFS from a linux user/admin point of view...is it worth getting involved in...i mean will i learn more technical aspects of linux...or is this a whole different ball park? (does it focus more on programming etc)

can anybody shed any more light on this?

thanks...
 
Old 03-18-2014, 06:54 PM   #2
TroN-0074
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: Michigan USA
Distribution: OpenSUSE 13.2 64bit-Gnome on ASUS U52F
Posts: 1,444

Rep: Reputation: 340Reputation: 340Reputation: 340Reputation: 340
Yo! Man. Linux From Scratch is a distro that has as their main purpose the study and learning of a general distro. In other words it is for academic purposes (Learning), Sure you can use as everyday desktop distro but maintaining it updated might be overwhelming for a regular human being.

I would encourage you to try it if you have the time. You can also look at: Gentoo; (http://www.gentoo.org/), Arch;(https://www.archlinux.org/) , FreeBSD;(http://www.freebsd.org/)

You would learn a ton by installing these and test them for four weeks each one of them
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-18-2014, 07:05 PM   #3
redd9
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Location: Canada
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 80
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 42
To echo the above post, you'd probably be better off installing Gentoo. It's easier to maintain and you'll learn a ton about how Linux works.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-18-2014, 08:45 PM   #4
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 11,792
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947Reputation: 2947
I would approach LFS as an learning experience only. With that approach, you can learn a lot, but it will take time. And, no, you do not have to code, but you do have to do a lot of command line stuff just to build the tool chain to be used to create the system, but the book lays it out line-by-line. You will learn lots of command-line tricks and tools. I would recommend building it in a VM, in fact.

If you are looking to build a system that you can use in a week or two, LFS is not a good choice.
 
Old 03-18-2014, 09:03 PM   #5
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 15,854

Rep: Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299Reputation: 2299
Worth it to do it once.
 
Old 03-18-2014, 09:06 PM   #6
grail
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Perth
Distribution: Manjaro
Posts: 9,437

Rep: Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842Reputation: 2842
Ditto to all of the above. As a main stream system you would need to be well versed in the art of compilation and
dependancy checking. Of course this is part of what is learnt from (C)LFS. Also, as it is a ground up distro you will also learn a great deal about howto setup your basic needs, network, UI, etc

As above, if looking for a hands on use now distro, all listed in post #2 plus Slackware would all be good to use as a main
system and a learning tool.
 
Old 03-19-2014, 01:05 PM   #7
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,131
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833
LFS is definitely worth it, if you want to know how a Linux distribution works under the hood. While some mebers here use it as their main distro that Isn't something I would do, but it is viable.
As already pointed out, you do not need to be able to code, but there are prerequisites that you should fulfill, otherwise what you will learn is mostly how to copy and paste commands.
 
Old 03-19-2014, 03:12 PM   #8
joe_2000
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2012
Location: Aachen, Germany
Distribution: Void, Debian
Posts: 812

Rep: Reputation: 216Reputation: 216Reputation: 216
I am a littlebit less enthusiastic about it than other posters here. You will learn some stuff by I don't think that what you learn is in a reasonable relationship with the time you need to invest.
So doing it for fun is ok, but if it's about getting to know linux better I would rather recommend using one of the more "manual" linux distros such as slackware, arch or aptosid.
It will teach you more in less time in my mind.
I also think that LFS will teach you more when you are already a quite experienced user. If you are too much of a newbie you may find yourself only copy-pasting commands without understanding what you are doing...
 
Old 03-19-2014, 03:18 PM   #9
szboardstretcher
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Detroit, MI
Distribution: GNU/Linux systemd
Posts: 4,184

Rep: Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584
I disagree. There is an intro to linux, operating systems and the build process,. explanation and overview in every single section, commentary on processes, and painstaking detail on every single switch and parameter used.

The only reason you wouldn't learn more from LFS is pure laziness.
 
Old 03-19-2014, 03:34 PM   #10
jamison20000e
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: ...uncanny valley... infinity\1975; (randomly born:) Milwaukee, WI, US, Earth, end border$! ◣◢┌∩┐ Fe26-E,e...
Distribution: any GPL that works well on my cheapest; has been KDE or CLI but open... http://goo.gl/NqgqJx &c ;-)
Posts: 3,311
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948
Almost all are 100% free to try\play so put in what you want to get out...

I was wondering why Slackware took so long to get here? My would be a netinst to. I agree VMs are great to learn in you can copy, backup, mess-up and delete at will not to mention run them as your main OS for many reasons.

Last edited by jamison20000e; 03-19-2014 at 03:35 PM. Reason: spelling
 
Old 03-19-2014, 04:29 PM   #11
szboardstretcher
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Detroit, MI
Distribution: GNU/Linux systemd
Posts: 4,184

Rep: Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584Reputation: 1584
^^ What in the world does your signature mean?
 
Old 03-19-2014, 04:40 PM   #12
joe_2000
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2012
Location: Aachen, Germany
Distribution: Void, Debian
Posts: 812

Rep: Reputation: 216Reputation: 216Reputation: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by szboardstretcher View Post
I disagree. There is an intro to linux, operating systems and the build process,. explanation and overview in every single section, commentary on processes, and painstaking detail on every single switch and parameter used.

The only reason you wouldn't learn more from LFS is pure laziness.
I am not saying you can't learn from LFS. I also did not mean to critisize the project as such. (I actually think it's great)
But you spend a lot of time compiling packages, and then recompiling them again, when really what you want to learn is how they all work together. I personally felt e.g. using Arch for a couple of months gave me more hands-on experience because you spend a lot of time on configuration files... I think knowing the config files is more useful knowledge than being able to compile the toolchain.
Matter of taste I guess...
 
Old 03-19-2014, 04:47 PM   #13
sigint-ninja
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: Republic Of Ireland
Distribution: Debian,Centos,Slackware
Posts: 472

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 29
hey jamison2000e whats so important about "My 1c would be a netinst too." whats so important about a net install? is it the best way to do it?

again thanks for all the input...i just cant make my mind up about LFS...anyway i have decided to install slackware in virtual box and read the notes on the slacker web site...
 
Old 03-19-2014, 04:56 PM   #14
joe_2000
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2012
Location: Aachen, Germany
Distribution: Void, Debian
Posts: 812

Rep: Reputation: 216Reputation: 216Reputation: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by sigint-ninja View Post
i just cant make my mind up about LFS...anyway i have decided to install slackware in virtual box and read the notes on the slacker web site...
If you have the time and are curious... by all means try it out. It's fun and interesting. And if you don't like it you can always stop :-)
 
Old 03-19-2014, 04:58 PM   #15
jamison20000e
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: ...uncanny valley... infinity\1975; (randomly born:) Milwaukee, WI, US, Earth, end border$! ◣◢┌∩┐ Fe26-E,e...
Distribution: any GPL that works well on my cheapest; has been KDE or CLI but open... http://goo.gl/NqgqJx &c ;-)
Posts: 3,311
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948Reputation: 948
Sorry I forgot to add the link for what netinst is when you google it. It (like most variants mentioned here) starts out CLI only and you build from there.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is it Linux worth if for me dgg9879 General 17 09-05-2006 08:42 PM
Learning Linux from scratch - worth it / needed? mxk Linux - Newbie 38 06-27-2004 12:29 AM
ali aladdin v agp stinks :scratch: :scratch: :scratch: Mr Marmmalade Linux - Hardware 1 07-08-2003 05:11 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:26 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration