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Old 05-14-2010, 04:53 PM   #31
fruttenboel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTK358 View Post
So in the end, the reason Linux users use the command line is not because the GUI is inferior but because the command line gives you far more power, versatility, and control.
I couldn't agree with you more! You are absolutely right.

Still, do you always need the brute force supplied by a CLI command as user 'root'? Do you need an H-bomb to take out a single bridge? Of course not. Most things can be done with limited editions of the powertools.

I remember the times that I programmed in the nuclear bomb version of all programming languages: assembly. On the CISCy 80x86 there were 300+ instructions. And 90% of what I used were 'move', 'jump' and 'compare' instructions.

If you maintain your system, small tools will be more than enough. If you wait until things go dramatically wrong you need the powertools (in the hands of a craftsman). So the trick is to do regular maintenance with flimsy tools. GUI tools offer that power. And they are less critical in use. One wrong letter in a CLI command and your system is wiped clean.

To erase the jed backup files (endimng in a '~' sign) I use 'rm *~'. But since I don't want to loose all of my work by a single typo (if you hit enter before you entered the '~'), I replaced this simple command by a batch file called 'purge' that ONLKY prevents me from forgetting the tilde.
Same with GUI-ified programs. With graphical utillities it's harder to do irreversible damage. Because they slow down the mechanic. They force you to look twice.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 04:58 PM   #32
fruttenboel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praveencavale View Post
Google has its own open source called chromium OS which is due to be released probably end of the year..
And they will ruthlessly wipe out all of Linux if we do not unite and stand up against the mammon. Mark my words.

The (stupid) world just adore all of Google because they think Google does things for free.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 05:05 PM   #33
praveencavale
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MS windows has been forced into our lives from the school days... But linux has been optional.. People think of linux only when they are bored of Windows or turn up against windows
 
Old 05-14-2010, 05:15 PM   #34
jefro
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See distrowatch.com for the top 20 or so. All are GUI and easy for most.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 05:16 PM   #35
praveencavale
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Originally Posted by fruttenboel View Post
And they will ruthlessly wipe out all of Linux if we do not unite and stand up against the mammon. Mark my words.

The (stupid) world just adore all of Google because they think Google does things for free.
Google's OS wont last long... it completely relies on cloud.. IF the cloud disappears for even a short time.. it could mean disaster for users/companies... and it wont be widespread also coz many nations dont have access to high speed internet and broadband is still unaffordable in such countries...
 
Old 05-14-2010, 05:49 PM   #36
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
See distrowatch.com for the top 20 or so. All are GUI and easy for most.
Arch (which I use) in #9 right now, and it doesn't have a GUI when you install it!

You have to install it yourself!
 
Old 05-14-2010, 05:59 PM   #37
praveencavale
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Originally Posted by MTK358 View Post
Arch (which I use) in #9 right now, and it doesn't have a GUI when you install it!

You have to install it yourself!
What was the first distro you used to learn linux? GUI or CLI?
 
Old 05-14-2010, 06:08 PM   #38
MTK358
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Fedora 11.

But I used the CLI admin tools.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 06:50 PM   #39
damgar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praveencavale View Post
What was the first distro you used to learn linux? GUI or CLI?
The first distro I used was Mandriva. I liked it, but it felt a little sluggish. Then Ubuntu which I liked, but it felt a little sluggish. After a bit I felt like those 2 were too easy and I didn't feel like I was really learing anything about linux since I was just using the GUI's. That's when I installed Slackware which I used alongside of Ubuntu until a few weeks ago when I decided to run Slack on all 4 machines.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 07:21 PM   #40
vigi
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When you have a problem via the command line; the PC talks back to you - When a gui does not work you are left looking at a pretty picture or (in windows you are fooled into following a troubleshooting procedure to eventually be told your computer is in good health and have a nice day.

The trouble I find with linux is the inconsistency of commands between different distributions, and remembering the less often used commands when I need them.

This is why I will stick to slackware; it is consistent and you can learn linearly.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 07:57 PM   #41
praveencavale
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vigi View Post
When you have a problem via the command line; the PC talks back to you - When a gui does not work you are left looking at a pretty picture or (in windows you are fooled into following a troubleshooting procedure to eventually be told your computer is in good health and have a nice day.

The trouble I find with linux is the inconsistency of commands between different distributions, and remembering the less often used commands when I need them.

This is why I will stick to slackware; it is consistent and you can learn linearly.
For a noob like me.. ubuntu seems very user friendly, i havent checked slackware/mandriva

what do u suggest? should i stick to ubuntu? I dont want an OS that tells me to type every minute detail to do even a simple task
 
Old 05-14-2010, 07:57 PM   #42
damgar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vigi View Post
The trouble I find with linux is the inconsistency of commands between different distributions, and remembering the less often used commands when I need them.

This is why I will stick to slackware; it is consistent and you can learn linearly.
As far as slackware goes I agree.

On the less often used/complicated commands, if there is a complicated command that I need (especially if it has to be run with X shutdown, such as when upgrading KDE or something) I simply open an editor, add the shabang, add the command and save it to /usr/bin then do
Code:
chmod +x /usr/bin/my-new-script
so that all I have to do is execute the name of the file I just saved:
Code:
mynewscript
I know that is cheating, but it works a treat.

I also do it to save typing, such as when I'm fiddling around on my samba server rather than having to type
Code:
/etc/rc.d/rc.samba restart
I just made a little script with the above so that I just type "samb" and hit TAB to execute "samba\ restart" which restarts samba.

Last edited by damgar; 05-14-2010 at 08:02 PM.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 08:05 PM   #43
damgar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by praveencavale View Post
For a noob like me.. ubuntu seems very user friendly, i havent checked slackware/mandriva

what do u suggest? should i stick to ubuntu? I dont want an OS that tells me to type every minute detail to do even a simple task
Mandriva felt the most windows-like while providing me with some basic understanding of how things worked in linux. Ubuntu with gnome felt more different, but I didn't feel like I got as good an understanding, but after you get used to the tools it's probably a better package. Just my two cents.

EDIT: I haven't tried Ubuntu since 9.04 or Mandriva since spring 2009.1. I think that is worth mentioning.

Last edited by damgar; 05-14-2010 at 08:06 PM.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 08:33 PM   #44
vigi
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by praveencavale View Post
For a noob like me.. ubuntu seems very user friendly, i havent checked slackware/mandriva

what do u suggest? should i stick to ubuntu? I dont want an OS that tells me to type every minute detail to do even a simple task
--------------------
As my mate the chef used to advise his customers when they looked at the menu and could not decide.. "why not have one of each".

I regard myself as a newbie and have had as many as 7 systems on one computer. I use slackware_current 95% of the time however I like to keep a version of ubuntu as well. It is handy to use/test the odd application as well as a fallback. Most people advise you to start with ubuntu, however if you are prepared to read and use the command line---my conclusion is Slackware is the best distribution. I used ubuntu for years; however I have been learning only on slackware.

Thank you Damgar for the information.
 
Old 05-14-2010, 08:41 PM   #45
Bratmon
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I'm sorry, but I can't understand why so many people are afraid of words. It's weird.
 
  


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