LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-28-2009, 05:34 AM   #1
smaj84_1
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Location: Pakistan
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 71

Rep: Reputation: 15
Internal And External Commands..


Hi to all...
Someone asked me that what are the Internal and External Commands in Linux....I have googled but couldnt find the answer...can anyone tell me any link in which Internal and External commands explained....I also wana know 1 line defination of Source and Binaries.. I have searched that on google too but didnt find anything like this which I wana know...

Thanks

SMAJ
 
Old 07-28-2009, 05:41 AM   #2
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
What do you mean by "internal" and "external" commands?
 
Old 07-28-2009, 05:50 AM   #3
colucix
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Bologna
Distribution: CentOS 6.5 OpenSuSE 12.3
Posts: 10,509

Rep: Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978Reputation: 1978
An excerpt from the Table of Contents of the Advanced Bash Scripting Guide:
Code:
Part 4. Commands
    14. Internal Commands and Builtins
    15. External Filters, Programs and Commands
Regarding source and binaries, this is a source:
Code:
$ cat hello.c
/* hello.c: display a message on the screen */

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
	printf("hello, world\n");
}
you compile it:
Code:
$ gcc -o hello hello.c
$
then execute the binary:
Code:
$ ./hello
hello, world
$
 
Old 07-28-2009, 05:50 AM   #4
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
After your previous thread, I'm not sure what your motives are----i.e. why are you asking this question? You may need to consult with the person who asked you.....

Is it possible that you are talking about commands built-in to BASH, vs. the standalone utilities?

One-line definition of source and binaries:
Source: the starting point
Binary: the final product

Here too, what is the context? What problem are you trying to solve?
 
Old 07-28-2009, 05:55 AM   #5
smaj84_1
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Location: Pakistan
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 71

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks All...
 
Old 07-28-2009, 06:09 AM   #6
smaj84_1
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Location: Pakistan
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 71

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
After your previous thread, I'm not sure what your motives are----i.e. why are you asking this question? You may need to consult with the person who asked you.....

Is it possible that you are talking about commands built-in to BASH, vs. the standalone utilities?

One-line definition of source and binaries:
Source: the starting point
Binary: the final product

Here too, what is the context? What problem are you trying to solve?
I have just started to learn linux and I m having many problems that's why I use to ask here....first I try to search on Google and then if I couldnt find the desired results then I come here and write....I didnt get exact answer about Internal and External commands in Linux yet...
 
Old 07-29-2009, 09:38 AM   #7
geek745
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Boston, MA
Distribution: Slackware; Ubuntu; Slax
Posts: 172
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
I didnt get exact answer about Internal and External commands in Linux yet...
Perhaps you are coming from an MS-DOS context, in which there are internal and external commands - from a filesystem perspective, internal commands are understood directly by the shell - command.com - and in the case of linux, BASH/ksh/csh/your favorite shell. Internal commands are, for example, cd, dir/ls, copy, rename, del. External commands would be contained in their own executable - for DOS, external commands like more (a pager), xcopy (to copy hidden and system files), etc. which are all fairly standard but nonetheless external to the shell. In linux, there are several commandline utilities that are likewise considered standard but which are not part of the shell - grep, awk, and sed for text processing, for example, as well as editors like vim and emacs.

Unless you are building an embedded system and care about what files to delete to make your own small-disk-footprint linux, this sounds like a textbook question and answer to me, but I, too appreciate the theoretical explanation, so I offer you mine.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to tell which disk is external and which is internal pobrika Linux - Hardware 1 06-08-2009 06:58 PM
Routing internal to external Harvfive Linux - Networking 0 11-07-2008 09:09 AM
Internal and external cmd siva19185 Linux - Newbie 1 07-10-2008 09:33 AM
rbash - internal commands junkken Linux - Security 5 02-02-2005 08:46 AM
Modems: internal vs. external? Zen Arcade Linux - Newbie 7 06-21-2003 05:45 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:48 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration