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ash_zz_00 08-08-2009 06:05 PM

Installing Slackware on HP dv6t series notebook
 
Hi,
I have Slackware 11.0 and trying to install it on my HP dv6t notebook. I loaded the default base kernel, which I think (though not sure) is sata.i. It didn't seem to recognize my SATA hard drive because both cfdisk and fdisk failed. Should I be using a different kernel?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Regards,

Ash.

onebuck 08-08-2009 08:35 PM

Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

What's the reason for choosing an older version of Slackware for a notebook? Slackware 12.2 is the stable version that is available. Slackware 13 RC2 is now a available. Stable 13 is around the corner. :) You would have better luck with the newer release with the newer kernels for the notebook.

The above links and others available from 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

ash_zz_00 08-08-2009 09:04 PM

Hi,
The only reason I tried Slackware 11.0 is because I had a copy of it, which I had installed on my desktop more than a year back. But as you have suggested, it makes more sense to get the latest release so the drivers would be be more up to date. I'll give that a try.

Thanks!

Ash.

jstephens84 08-08-2009 09:35 PM

12.2 should find it by default. But if it does not you may need to select a different kernel. I believe you can press f2 or f3 and it should display what your options are and give you a brief summary.

onebuck 08-09-2009 07:44 AM

Hi,

You will have two installer kernels available for choice to boot. The huge.s and hugesmp.s kernels are the installer kernels. You should use the 'hugesmp.s' kernel whenever possible for your default installer but run either generic kernel;

Quote:

excerpt from CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT;
As stated earlier, it is recommended that you use one of the generic kernels
rather than the huge kernels; the huge kernels are primarily intended as
"installer" and "emergency" kernels in case you forget to make an initrd.
For most systems, you should use the generic SMP kernel if it will run,
even if your system is not SMP-capable. Some newer hardware needs the
local APIC enabled in the SMP kernel, and theoretically there should not be
a performance penalty with using the SMP-capable kernel on a uniprocessor
machine, as the SMP kernel tests for this and makes necessary adjustments.
Furthermore, the kernel sources shipped with Slackware are configured for
SMP usage, so you won't have to modify those to build external modules
(such as NVidia or ATI proprietary drivers) if you use the SMP kernel.
You should look at all the text help files available to you for reference;

RELEASE_NOTES
CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT
UPGRADE.TXT

Just a few more useful links;

SlackwareŽ Essentials
SlackwareŽ Basics
Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Linux Newbie Admin Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux


The above links and others available from 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

ash_zz_00 08-15-2009 01:51 PM

Yes, Slackware 12.2 found my SATA drive without a problem.
Thanks for the suggestions.

Regards,

Ash.

onebuck 08-15-2009 02:40 PM

Hi,

Great!

You can mark the post as [SOLVED] via the Thread Tools.

w1k0 08-15-2009 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by onebuck (Post 3644619)
You can mark the post as [SOLVED] via the Thread Tools.

...as well as click ``thumb up'' icon in useful onebuck's post.


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